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October 12, 1976 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

dog Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I uesday, October 12, 19 l6

THE MICHIGAN ,DAILY tuesday, October 12, 19/~5

_. _

Lenient
graduation
pliy
pBe
unusedt
(Continued from Page 1)
were approved by the Board of
Regents last year.
Those changes allowed stu-
dents greater options for satis-
fying their distribution require-
ments - categorizing classes
by "disciplinary. content" and
by "approaches to knowledge,"
for example. The traditional dis-
tribution requirement plan was
also retained.
JACKSON SAID there has not
yet been much use of the new
plans by students.
Concentration requirements
were also revamped, and re-
quired academic counseling was
-,abolished. Counselor approval of
course elections is necessary
only in "key' decision-making
points," instead of at the begin-
ning of each term.

MAO'S WIDOW IMPLICATED:

w . .

,:

Chinese coup plotters seized

A',

'Offer rejected for
binding arbitration

(Continued from Page 1) Thhe Peple's Daily newspap-
struggle. er, official organ of the Com-
munist Party, declared on its
ANALYSTS HERE said China front-page Sunday: "Unite,
appeared to be passing through Don't Split . . . Don't intrigue
its biggest upheaval since the or conspirt."
Lin Piao affair five years ago SUNDAY HUA appeared for
when Defense Minister Lin was the first time since the crisis
alleged to have died after at- broke to the surface on Sat-
tempting a coup. urday. He turned up at Peking
The streets of Peking were Airport to welcome Michael
relaxed early yesterday. Tra- Somare, the Prime Minister ofI
vellers arriving from Shanghai, Papua-New Guinea.
Nanking and~ the southern city Smiling, chatting amiably with
of Canton said there were no officials, he put on an impres-
signs of unrest. sive display of confidence. With
Observers said if Hua suc- him was Vice-Premier Li Hsien-
cessfully consolidated his posi- nien, 71, a leading moderate and
tion, it would put China under close associate of the late Chou
the rule of pragmatic and less En-lai.
extreme leadership.; Li is China's top financial ex-!
pert and a man respected by
S I N C E S A T U R D A Y all sides for his administrative.
there have been numerous signs talent and party loyalty.
of dissension in the leadership.;
The official media have car- LI IS NOW being tipped as
ried tough warnings that any at- a possible premier after Hua's
tempt by right or leftwing "op-. appointment as chairman is for-
portunists" to split the party mally announced.
would fail. I Sources here told Reuters they

had been informed that Chinese
cadres (officials) down to a
fairly low level had now been
briefed about the arrests. News
was spreading among the peo-
ple by word of mouth,, they
added.
Correspondents here noticed
an unmistakeable relief among
Chinese Sunday as news of Hua's
appointment went up on more
wallposters.

and film works were devoloped
along ever stricter, more puri-
tanical and political lines.
The bespectacled First Lady
appeared in a place of honor
at the~mass rallies of millions
of Red Guards held in China
during the second half of 1966.
When she addressed them, she
waved the little Red Book of her
husband's thoughts.
It soon became clear that Mao

It has since been acknowledg-

had entrusted to his wife respon-Y
CHIANG CHING, who has; sibility for a nationwide cam-
been the main rallying point signeigntowiesem
for radicals during the past paign designed to wean Chinese
year, took no part in China's away from cultural influences
year too no art Chia'she considered bourgeois, feudal
political life until the cultural he conired
revolution of a decade ago. r SHE BECAME cultural advi-
Together with Yad, she helped'S HE AMEdc.ramv
spak te tmuluou reoluion ser to the armed forces. From
spark the tumultuous revolution. the task of remodelling litera-
Chang and Wang also rose to ture, art, theatre, opera, ballet
prominence as a result of the and music along proletarian
cultural revolution. lines, she extended he influence
A former movie actress, she to the whole scope of political
married Mao in 1939 and was decision-making.
his fourth wife. In recent years In April, 1969, se was elected
she has been the guardian of a full member of the policy-
China's "Revolutionarts." making Politburo of the Chinese
UNDER HER AEGIS, stage Communist Party.;

ed that the Cultural Revolution (Continued from Pae i)
to some extent got out of hand the issue through binding arbi-
when young Red Guards ram- tration," Moran explained. "It
Spaged across China, denouncing seems they're trying to tell us
often highly respected figures, theirhey have already made
indulging in mob violence and' their final offer and w! will
smashing treasures of Chinese have to accept it ' N
culture and art, though Chiang N E G Q T I A T I U N S
Ching did not encourage such broke down nearly two ,weeks
excesses. ago with the two sides still
"miles apart." GEO is still ask-
THE LAST TIME she and the:i ing for a 6.5 per cent pay hike
other three leaders appeared plus a 50 per cent cut in tui-
was on September 30 at a na- tion, while the University is of-
tional day rally in the ancient fering a 5 per cent raise with
Forbidden City. no cut in tuition.
Television coverage showed They are even farther apart
Madame Mao in ebullient form, on non-economic issues, with
jumping to her feet to enthu- the union still demanding a
siastically applaud a speech by strong affirmative action plan,
Hua. University funded child care,
Observers pointed out although smaller classes, and a Teaching
the four radicals are allegedly Assistant training program, all
accused of plotting a coup, they of which the Administration
may not have been planning a claims "simply doesn't belong
military take-over, in a labor contract."
IT SEEMED unlikely they With arbitration out as a pos-
could drum up significant army sible solution, the only way to
support, except perhaps in Man- avert a strike is to resume bar-
churia. gaining.

fails, GEO would not walkout
for at least another two weeks
The union extended the con-
tract deadline to a week from
today, Oct. 19, and will try to
bargain until then.
If a settlement has not been
reached by the 19th, the union
members could vote to circu-
late a strike referendum. This
would take about one week, at
which time the membership
would gather again and take a
strike vote.* If a majority of
those present voted for a walk-
out, the picket lines would be
up by the first of November.
G;rounlds
Dept.
sweeps;
clean
(Continued from Page 1)
THE DEPARTMENT also re-
moves snow from Central and
North Campus and from the
Medical Center. Of all the snow
plowing jobs, keeping emergen-
cy routes open and the Univer-
sity Hospital clear are the top
priorities in snow removal.
For the future, the depart-
ment plans to preserve the nat-
ural character of the North cam-
pus. With the hope of attracting
small animals, the Forestry De-
partment has planted greens
and seedlings which will im-
prove the cover and food sourc-
es for smalr animals. The
grounds department has also in-
troduced a policy of reduced
mowing of North campus, "done
to put it back into its own per-
spective."

a-A

1-STOP SHOPPING SAVES MONEY, TIME, ENERGY

IV Ji I E

1I

I

1:[1W

"WE ARE going to ask them
to go back to collective bar-
gaining to try to reach a set-
tlementsaid Moran. "But they
will have to be willing 'to bar-
gain seriously."
But University President
Robben Fleming was not con-
fident that a return to bargain-
ing would prevent a walkout.
"Their present positions are
considerably out of our reach,",
Fleming said. "And if theyc
stick to their present demands
. . . well it would probably I
mean a strike."
Even if collective bargaining .
S'eCial rates
for Couples
on Tuesdaysf
BILLIARDS at t
the UNION !t
f777 Z

thrifty acres

PRICES GOOD THRU OCTOBER 16, 1976. MEIJER RESERVES
THE RIGHT TO LIMIT SALES ACCORDING TO SPECIFIED
LIMITS. NO SALES TO DEALERS, INSTITUTIONS OR
DISTRIBUTORS.

a.-
ELENA ALL-PURPOSE
MAKE-UP REMOVER
PADS
r 100 count

MIRROR GRAPHICS

4

j II u F9
1
1 , /
7
../
j'
//J
l

homecoming '76

Major Events
and UAC are
proud to present

Judy Collins

MEN'
FLANNEL SHIRTS
* Choose from aolarge selection of
soft, warm ploids in 100% cotton
" Sizes S-M-L-XL

4

by Intercrcf t
Subjects are silk screened on"
high-quality mirrors of float plate
glass. Your choice of plants or
skyscapes in full color. Overall
size is 20"x 26"

QUARTZ
HAND SPOTLIGHT
- 12 foot cord
" Fits all 12 volt systems
* 200,000 candle power
OUR REG. $24.97
$14"

OUR REG. $1
$1o0

$
3%

$159

Cosmetic DPt. Men's Dept. I Gifts & Lamps Dept. Auto Supplies Dept.
PORK LOIN BLADE ROAST

friday, october 29
hill auditorium, 8 pm

I..
11w 1--

GREAT FOR BAKING - GENUINE U.S. N0.1 10lb. bag
IDAHO POTATOES 974

reserved seats $6, $5, $4
tickets on sale wednesday, october 6
michigan union box office 11 :.0-5:30
no personal checks
smoking and beverage.s strictly prohibited

(763-2071)

FRANCO AMERICAN
SPAGHETTI

4
14

SAVE 41
14-314 4
wt. can

JIFFY YELLOW, WHINE, OR DEVILS FOOD - SAVE1 W
CAKE MIXES 18N
DEANS NEW IMPROVED (4 VARIETlES) - SAVE 19V

VOW R I

Soz.
art. Canton

Iot

TOMORROW
~n asoccason won
$4.50 - $5.50 -$6.50

PILLS3UR

16f

FLOUR
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m MILLS
MEJER G EEA COP
BUGLES
7 .t . 6w
4AI1athI

mi

30,
COUPON

SNOWY BLEACH
40o. wt. bw

ll

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$129

-.,~ ~r - - . N 'V MW W - - U - w, ~w' ~u

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