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October 10, 1976 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sunday, October 10, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pnao Sever

rvyc acvcr.

'Y

PASSES FAIL TO HELP STATE:

Blue bulldozes past Spartans

(Continued from Page 1) tore," said Lytle. "When you,
halted Spartan drives with in- hear something tear and every-
terceptions, the second of which thing loosens up, it really scar-
wolfman Jerry Zuver returned es you."
60 yards for a touchdown. Lytle, a track sprinter who
The first, by defensive end once finished fifth in the 60-yard
John Anderson, stopped State dash in the Big Ten indoor meet,
at the Michigan 11 to preserve impressed the crowd of 104,211
a 28-10 halftime lead. with his speed on his 75-yard
MICHIGAN quarterback Rick touchdown run at 12:25 of the
Leach, in keeping with his pat first quarter,
tern of alternating good and "BEING ON THE track team
bad passing games, followed his really teaches you how to run,"
3-14-3 Wake Forest game with said Lytle. "A lot of people
a five-for-seven day against the: can sprint 30 yards but then
Spartans for 93 yards. reach their peak. They tighten
Favorite receiver Jim Smith up and lose their form. Track
grabbed three of them, includ- teaches you to keep on driving
ing a 46-yarder that snapped the and driving."1
Wolverines out of some second- Not surprisingly, the three top
half doldrums and set up their rushers on Michigan's explosive
fifth score. offense are track sprinters --
Lytle's explosive performance Lytle, Huckleby and Russell Da-
pushed him past Ed Shuttles- vis, who finished with 90 yards
worth on Michigan's all-time as substitute fullback. All have
rushing list. With 2,367 career broken away on long touchdown
yards, he now stands fourth runs this season.
behind Billy Taylor, Gordon Bell The 75-yard run up the mid-
and Ron Johnson. dle came at just the right time
THE FREMONT, OHIO native for the Wolverines. Minutes ear-
left the game late in the third lier, Michigan State had turned
quarter with a slightly twisted a Michigan fumble into a short
knee that shouldn't keep him drive for a 24-yard field goal
ER out of any practices this week., and a 3-0 lead.
of For a moment, though, it seem- A FEW MINUTES later, Mich-
ner ed worse. igan had the ball again at mid-
"I twisted it and the tape field following a rushed, weak
nunt. Huckleby took a pitch
from Leach at the 38 and again
the Spartan defensive backfield
watched a Blue shirt blur go
by and into the end zone.
Usually sure-handed Jim Smith
ave State a chance to get back
inthe game when he misjudged
ntwmd-blown pent that the
Spartans pounced on at the
over Oklahoma scored the tying tihian six. After a loss of
touchdown with 1:28 left to x.foAr on a running play.Smith
id on play but former student man- tf9oq d a T nnass to tight end
goal ager Kevin Craig' snapped Mark rarTmer to t make it 14-10
oiler- the ball over holder Bud He- t4rk tremirt qaer.
they bert's hands.4: of the first qarter.
eery, * * * Anther big play, this time
a 28-yard run by Davis, ' set

up Michigan's third score early?
in the second quarter. The 80-
yard, 10-play drive was capped
by a three - yard keeper by
Leach.
A 27-YARD SCAMPER by Ly-
tle put the Wolverines close to
the goal line again, Huckleby
diving the last yard for a 28-10
lead with more than 10 minutes
left in the half.
The fake punt, which Michi-
gan "worked on all week," ac-
cording to Lytle, came on the
next drive. With fourth and
three at the Michigan 45, Ly-}
tle took the short snap,, broke
through right tackle and wasn't
pulled down until he reached
the 10.
But State stiffened at this
point and repelled, the Wolver-
ines. Leach and Davis were
each stopped for no gain at:
the one-foot line. .
THE SPARTAN defense tough-
ened in the second half, but
slipped up on the 46-yard Leach
to Smith pass that set up Huck-
leby's third score, a two-yard
plunge at 0:46 of the third
quarter.
Zuver's interception return
came early in the final quarter
to finish the scoring.
Michigan came within a foot
of another touchdown in the
waning minutes of the game,
but again the Spartans clogged
things up.
STATE THREATENED to
score at the end of the game
as sub quarterbacl Marshall
Lawson led his team down to
the Michigan two before time
ran .out.
The point total and victory
margin were Michigan's biggest
in this storied series since 1947,
won the Wolverines won, 55-0.
The win was Schembechler's
'1t at Michigan, tving him with
the legendary Fritz Crisler for
victories.

Doily Photo by SCOTT ECCKE
MICHIGAN STATE'S' Mark Brammer (91) hauls in an Ed Smith pass in the first period
yesterday's game. The catch resulted in the only touchdown for the Spartans. Bramm
made the reception undaunted by Jerry Zuvers (8) desperate lunge.

PRETZELLOI
By RICK BONINO M
'Moreho-hum . .
to come?
LAST WEEKEND in Ann Arbor,'the word was "boring." After
watching Michigan mundanely muddle past Wake Forest,
most of the 100,000-plus crowd must have left wondering when
Don Canham would install reclining bleachers.
According to the local media, monotony also reigned in East
Lansing, where Michigan State and Notrt Dame took turns trying
to define ineptitude.
Yesterday, the intrastate rivals showed they had learned
their lethargy lessons well, adding an exercise in ennui to
the otherwise distinguished series.
All indicators pointed to something more stimulating. In
addition to tradition, the Wolverines came in with a No. 1 ranking
to defend and the Spartans with penalty-pierced pride to protect,
thanks to some questionable recruiting.
But, despite the pregame flurries of excitement and anticipa-
tion, the contest - regardless of its importance to the men on the
field - provided another siesta for the folks in the stands.
Let's face it - as thrilling as a top-ranked team and un-
defeated season should seem, this year promises to prove a
real drag until Ann Arbor's Americans again discover Columbus
on November 20.
Despite all the trimmings, the overall season should offer
few reasons for the adrenalin to flow. A Big Ten team's
national top ranking has none of the flair of a similar standing
for a Big Eight squad, where an upset threat looms large
each week.
Even with the sketchy schedule, there should at least be
some interesting individual games, right? Like Stanford - would
they pass us out of the stadium (51-0). And, regardless of
quality, the MSU game is always really something - isn't it?
(42-10.)
The future holds little promise. Slumping Illinois has a
questionable offense, Purdue probably not enough defense. Tony
Dungy-led Minnesota appears solid on paper, but one shouldn't
look for too much from a Big Ten team that needed a last-
minute surge to whip Western Michigan.
Okay, so there should at least be some provocative plays,
right? Right. That's what kept us awake those first three weeks -
a big play-rich offense which turned routs into interesting
exercises in execution and long-distance running.
But even these offensive hors d'oeuvers may well migrate
from Michigan's menu. These past two weeks, opponents have
keyed on tailback Harlan Huckleby and virtually ripped the
option pitch page out of the Wolverine playbook.
'Of course, as Schembechler says, this opens up other op-
port-nities - but, Lytle's burst nonwithstanding, none of these
seem as consistently exciting as the gasp-drawing, crowd-raising
Huck around end.

MINNESOTA TOPPLES ILLINI:
Ohio State

By The Associated Press
IOWA CITY - Ohio State
fullback Pete Johnson set a
Big Ten Conference scoring re-
cord as he ran for three touch-
downs to help the Buckeyes to
a 34-14 victory over Iowa yester-
day.
The Buckeyes scored on their
first three possessions, with
sophomore quarterback Rod
Gerald getting the first on a 17-
s.
Win inl
Playoffs
By The Associated Press
Catfish Hunter fired a bril-
liant fivehitter, pitching the
New York Yankees to a 4-1
victory over the Kansas City
Royals in yesterday's opening
game. of the American League
championship playoffs.
The victory gave the Yank-
ees a 1-0 lead in the best-of-
five series, which continues
Sunday night.
Hunter was scintillating
through the sun - splashed
afternoon, protecting a slender
Yankee lead, constructed with
the help of two errors by Kan-
sas City third baseman George!
Brett , in the first inning.
Meanwhile, Don Gullett pitch-:
ed eight innings of two-hit ball
and drove in three runs, and
George Foster homered Satur-
day night, giving the Cincinnati
Reds a 6-3 victory over the
Philadelphia Phillies in the op-
ening game of the National.
League playoffs.
The second game of the best-
of-five series will be played
here Sunday afternoon.
Gullett was almost flawless
after the first inning when he
gave up his, only run.

yard -run to cap an 82-yard
drive.
Tom Skladany, the nation's
leading pinter the last two
years, kicked four extra
points and field goals of 26
and 46 yards in the contest
dominated by the 10th rated
Buckeyes.
Iowa got two fourth-quarter
touchdowns on a five-yard run
by tailback Ernie Sheeler and
a three-yard plunge by quarter-
back Butch Caldwell.
f) Onhrs ground
M I N N E A P ) L I S -
Reser7,p fullback Jim Perkins
score ree touchdowns in the
seco -'arter yesterday as
the U -ersity of Minnesota de-
feated lilinois 29-14.
Tony Durgy added a seven-
yard touchdown run and
freshman Paul Rogind kicked
a 32-yard field goal for the
Gophers.
Perkins, a 205-pound senior,
scored on runs of seven, six
and one yard, boosting 'his sea-
son TD total to seven.
Purdue nips
MADISON - Sophomore
Rock Suppan kicked two field
goals, including the decisive
20-yarder with 2:13 to play, and'
John Skibinski rushed for 133
yards to lead Purdue to an 18-16

belts
college football victory+
Wisconsin yesterday.
Wisconsin took a 16-15 lea
Vince Lamia's 33-yard field
with 10:35 left, but the Bo
makers got the break
needed when safety Paul B
who intercepted four pa
picked off his third and
turned 14 yards to the Pu
45.
Hoosiers blank
B L O O M I N G T O
Indiana's Scott Arnett,r
ing his first start at qua
back, scored a first-pe
touchdown and Harold W
house intercepted two N
western passes in the end
yesterday as the Hoo
edged the Wildcats 7-0.
It was Indiana's first s
out since 1969, when
Honsiers beat Michigan S
16-0.
Indiana freshman tail
Mike Harkrader rushed for
yards and set up Arm
touchdown with kev gainsi
way through the first quar
* * *.
Sooners (drI i
DALLAS - Third - ra
Oklahoma had their cha
for an unprecedented third+
secutive national title sev
damaged yesterday as
Sooners settled foras6-6 tie,
the Texas Longhorns.

lsses
re-
rdue
N -
mak-
rter-
eriod
rater-
orth-
zone
siers
hut-
the
tate
back
r 179
ett's
mid-
ter.
.ked
nces
con-,
erely
the
with

Buldc ns stummedl
OXFORD, Miss - Quarter-
back Tim Ellis shocked fourth-
ranked Georgia with two sec-;
ond - quarter touchdowns yes- First Downs
terday to spur the Mississinni Rushing (att/yds)
Rebels to a 21-17 upset of the gPli/g m/ds)
previously unbeaten Bulldogs. Total Yards
Ellis, taking advantage of Punting (no/avg)
two big breaks, ran five yards Interceptions t)
for one toiichdown and then Yards Penalized
whipped a 36-yard bomb to tail-R
back Reg Woilard just before RUSHI
halftime in the Southeastern Michig
Conference battle.
- * * *

fho(IiralMichigran

MICH., MsU

23,
62-442
7-5-93
535
2-40
2
3-3
16
ING

18
28-98
46-24-?51
349
9-31
0
0-0
22

. Smit
White
G. John!
Brammer
Gibson
Byrd
Wliungh;
3aes
sarlev
Jackson
Rollick
DleRose

RECEIVING
Michigan
no
It 3
1I
son 1
MSU
r 4
4
2
lam 2
S
2
2
2"
1
SCORING PLAYS

yd
76
12
5
48
36
32
31
34
21
17
18
M

long
46;
12
5.
19
21
21,
21
11
12
9
8
18
MSI

gan
att
10

Pit tpounds. D Davis
P I T T S B U R G H-Tony L eh
Dorsett became the second J. Smith
leading rusher in college foot- Reid
ball history inrhelpingtsecond- Jackson
ranked Pittsburgh beat Louis- Saes
ville 27-6 yesterday, but the Vic- Earley
tory was tainted for the Pan- Lawson
thers by an injury to quarter-
back Matt Cavanaugh.
Dorsett neds 379 yards to
surpass Archie Griffith's all- Leach
time high of 5.117 yards with E. smith
Ohio State. Lawson

on

23
13
11
MSU
2
12
1
PASSING

yds
180
126
91
36
4
45
45
8
0

avg
18.0
5.5
7.0
3.3
2.5
2.0
0
3.5
3.7
4.0
0
yds
93
198
53

MSU - Nielson 24 yard
field goal 0
MICH - Lytle 75 yard run
(Wood kick) 7
MICH - Huckleby 38 yard
run (Wood kick) 14
WSU - Brammer, 10 yard
passfrom E. Smith
(Nielson kick) 14
41CH - Leach 3 yard run
(Wood kick) 21
MICH - Huckleby 1 yard
run (Wood kick) 28
MICH - Huckleby 2 yard
run (Woodkick 35
MICH -- Zuver 60 yard
pass interception (Wood
kick) 42

Michigan
attc
7

MSU
37
9

corn
S
19
5

int
0
2
0

STEEBY BREAKS BOTH LEGS-

Big: Ten Standings

3 Add an increasingly spotty offense which has evidenced
3 many recent execution problems and the point parade may
prove less prolific, and presumably less piquant, than previously.
But don't give up hope. You may yet avoid premature alpha
10 wave attacks if you keep your eye on the Michigan defense.
Yes, that much-maligned unit that seemed so shaky early
10 in the season has come on to outshine its offensive counterpart.
to And, on this day, senior wolfman Jerry Zuver mustered the most
melodramatic manuevers.
10 Zuver, blossoming as a fulltimer after Dwight Hicks'
injury caused a defensive realignment, played what he con-
10 sidered "definitely my best game ever" - and this from last
week's Defensive Champion.
Amid his numerous hard hits and passes broken' up, Zuver
generated the bulk of the second-half excitement when he picked
off an Ed Smith pass and raced sixty yards for the score.
"The quarterback (Smith) dropped back three steps," Zuver
began to explain the steal. "We worked hard on that in practice
this week and when we saw it we tried,-to read it.
lly "I looked at Smith and he was, looking at me, so I knew it
all was coming my way," the Ohioan continued. "It was a quick in
as. to the wide receiver and I just stepped in front. I knew I had
ut- it all the way."
nd As did the crowd, many of whom stood for the first time in
ed twenty-odd minutes and had little reason to rise afterwards.
So, in this' game where the offense supposedly sells the
of tickets and the defense wins the ballgames, we just might have
SU to rely on the Wolverine protective platoon for our jollies. What
-0. kind of Pretzel Logic is that?

MICHIGAN
Minnesota
Ohio State
Purdue
Indiana
Illinois
Wisconsin
Iowa
Michigan State
Northwestern

W
2
2
2
2
1
1
0
0
0
0

Conference
L T Pts. Opp.
0 0 82 37
0 0 61 27
0 0 84 35
0 0 49 35
1 0 20 32
1 0 38 35
2 0 43 58
2 0 20 58
2 0 31 91
2 0 19 38

W L
50
4 1
3 1
3 2
2 3
2 3
2 3
2 3
1 3
0 5

T
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0

Pts.
234
117
126
104
74
95
147
64
89
34

All Games

Opp.
51
89
70
109
114
89
127
122
156
125

Dekers pair, off;
Wise. tii
By DAN PERRIN equivale
With college football only five weeks into since bo
the season, the 'M' hockey team joined the insteado
action last night with their annual intrasquad son gam
game at Yost Ice Arena. Booter
The "White" team, led by senior Rob
Palmer and junior Dave DeBol, edged the The M
"Yellow" team 6-5 as the dekers prepared ped to on
for their Western Collegiate Hockey Asso- overtime
ciation opener at Wisconsin this Friday. terday a
Michig
VETERANS DeBol, Palmer, and junior ten mini
Kip Maurer were the leading point-getters, ton score
DeBol picked up four assists and Palmer from the
had two goals and one assist for the white ed on th
team. Maurer scored twice for the yellow to Sutto
team. with hisl
Dean Turner and sophomore Bill Wheeler Wiscon
each got with a goal and an assist. minutes
Other scorers included Captain Kris Man- son. The
ery, Russ Blanzy, Mike Coffman, Doug Todd, minute l
and Dave Brennan. goaloost
Goalie Rick Palmer put on an especially With t
impressive performance in the nets, stop- . time, tw
ping powerful slap shots from every direc- plaved,
tion. His counterpart, Frank Zimmerman, Wiscon
also did the job Hiving up just two goals in poal wit

Rugger!
By MIKE HALPIN
Somebody stepped on the
Webster A. Steeby Trophy
again. The little golden man
standing on top of the trophy
holding up the laurel wreath
was snapped off at the ankles.
Nobody has ever stepped on;
the Heisman Trophy or the
Lambert Trophy, but the Steeby
Trophy has been stepped on
more than once.
How does the Steeby Trophy;
come to suffer such indignities?
Well, the Webster A. Steeby
Trophy has the misfortune to
spend most of its time around'
rugby players and their friends.
As the symbol of victory in
the annual Michigan-Michigan
State rugby game, the trophy
was awarded to Michigan by
virtue of their 28-0 triumph
yesterday.
One might thing that such a
trophy would be cherished. It
should spend most of its time
on a mantle or in a trophy
case, seeing daylight only once
each year when it sits on ai
bunting-draped table on the
sidelines of the rugby field,
waiting to be given to the win-
ning team to hold for a year.
But rugby players being what
they are, (young men not much
given to frills) there is no tro-
phy case, there is no bunting,

0
ips booters
nt to a normal three period game,
th teams play with just three lines
of the four available in regular sea-
es.
rs bounced
By ERIC OLSON
[ic igan soccer club's record drop-
n win and three defeats after a 2-1
loss to the Wisconsin Badgers yes-
t Ferry Field.
an scored first to take a 1-0 lead
utes into the first half. David Sut-
ed on an indirect free kick six yards
Wisconsin goal. Steve Olson assist-
e goal by tapping the ball forward
rn who hammered it into the net
left foot.
sin tied the game with only two
remainings on a goal by John Ma-
Badgers almost won the game a
ater when they fired a shot off the
that rebounded over the endline.
he score tied 1-1 after regulation
o ten-minute overtime halves were
sin's Bill French scored the winning
h three minutes remaining in the

and there isn't even a table.
The trophy spent the last year
in a closet and went through
the game lying unnoticed in the
grass. Unnoticed until someone
stepped on it.
Still, Mr. Steeby would have
been proud of the battle that
was waged for the trophy he
donated in 1965. The East Lan-
sing poultry farmer is a big
Michigan fan and usually makes
it to the annual clash.
He was missing yesterday.
The Blue ruggers had MSU
on the defensive most of the
game but twice failed to score
from scrums and rucks with-
in easy striking distance of
the opponent's goal line. Cap-
tain Angelo Tocco felt that
"it,was an easy game but we
played sloppy."
Still, 28-0 is a respectable
score for an ailing squad which
played without 7 of its 15 best
men. Coming, off last week's
staggering 46-0 loss to Scioto
Valley (Ohio) in the finals of
the Stroh's Michigan Tourna-
ment, yesterday's victory reaf-
firmed Michigan's position as
the No. 1 rugby side in the
state.
Scoring in the contest was dis-
tributed fairly evenly through-
out the backfield with wingback
Tocco scoring two tries for 8

shutout State

points. Flyhalf/kicker Bil
Chung also scored 8 points,a
of them coming on conversion
Inside center Bill Conway, ou
side center Dave Weber, a
wingback Jim Fagin also scor
a try apiece.
In the "B" side game, the Bl
ruggers showed the depth
their club by beating the MS
"B" side by a score of 22

Rivalry still hot,
Pride at stake for Blue, MSU

By ANDY GLAZER
The faces were tight and
drawn. Not quite to the verge
of tears, but the looks were1
most un-Spartanlike.1
These were the once proud;
Michigan State Spartans filing
out the Michigan Stadium tun-
nel. For the seventh straight:
year they had failed to defeat'
Michigan's Wolverines; " this;

is a young Michigan State team,1
and youth spoke a bit different-
ly.
"IF ANYTHING, probation:
has fired us up," said freshman!
tight end Mark Brammer. "A
post-season bowl is out for us
for the next three years, and
that's about the best reward
you can have. So we work all
the hnrip fn mir recognition

time it was 42-10.
Has the steam
this rivalry? Have
sanctions taken the
of the Spartans? D
it.

y~y°:?St w:.+{our." ':es:::.rr rasr.w~av::"so: :,"sshao~i{V :........A;.:. ": *R":..."."o...'.''*..*.''A' ....~.

c,

SCOR ES

.......
:t

COLLEGE FOOTBALL
MICHIGAN 42, Michigan State 10
Purdue 18, Wisconsin 16
Indiana 7, Northwestern 0
Ohio State 34, Iowa 14
Minnesota 29, Illinois 14
Oklahoma 6, Texas 6 (tie)
Oklahoma State 21, Kansas 14
Texas Tech 27, Texas A&M 16
Nebraska 24, Colorado 12
wake F1'oest90. Clemson 14

w "r - w

Kent State 24, West. Michigan 12
Alabama 24, S. Mississippi 8
Penn State 38, Army 16
Shippensburg 10, Slippery Rock 3
East. Mitchigan 32, Arkansas St. 30
Delaware 15, Wm. and Mary 13
Cent. Michigan 17, Ohio U. 15
Mich. Tech 7, Moorehead St. 7, (tie)
Wayne State 41, Hillsdale 20
Washington 24, Oregon 12
Florida St. 28, Boston College 9

"I WAS CONFIDE
we all played our be
win," said Spartar
end Otto Smith. "W
me now is that I'l
another chance to1
gan. I've always wa
them and in five
weren't able to.
"We beat Ohio
Notre Dame. but

ne naraer urou r uugwi
;one out of'Inow."
the NCAA Brammer worked hard
stuffing out 'enough yesterday, hurting the
on't bet on Wolverines with four catches for
48 yards. One of them was a
ENT that if magnificent one-handed grab
est we could ( for State's lone touchdown. Was
n defensive he fired up for this game in
hat gets to particular?
1 never get "We've played some bigI
beat Michi- games already (Ohio State,
nted to beat Notre Dame), but this is the'
years we most important. game for me. II
was up, the whole team was'
State and: up. The seniors were super up."
not Michi-I

middle guard Melvin Land gets
one more shot at the Wolver-
nes.
"WE WERE LOOKING for-
ward to this so much all week,"
said Land. "I'm from Ohio, so
the Ohio State game probably
meant more to me. But every-
one wanted this one, you could
tell."
Michigan players were un-
abashed in post-game . enthusi-
asm.
"We've never lost to Michigan
State while I've been here,"
said middle linebacker Calvin
O'Neal. "And that makes it
a lot easier to live in Michi-
gan. "
Harlan Huckleby, who scored
three touchdowns from his tail-
back slot, agreed.
"I HAVE A LOT of friends
at MSU and I see them a lot
in the off season. I wanted to
show them that we could play
ball."
Jerry Zuver, whose.60-yard
touchdown interception return

'gan." ONE OF THE "super up"
SMITH'S MOVEMENTS were seniors was tailback Rich Baes,
ofntr n ; lt -r-v .+Ptt.. I wr. ~hrn manaIgedl4.51 Y rds in 121

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