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October 07, 1976 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1976-10-07

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'Thursday, October 7, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

P┬ęge Three

Thurday Ocobe 7, 976THEMICIGANDAIY Pge hre

Butz may aid Ford

Scientists find alcohol
reduces male hormone

to sway farm

WASHINGTON (AP) - Earl
Butz, who resigned as agricul-
ture secretary during an up-
roar over his racial remarks,
said yesterday he still hopes
to campaign for President
Ford.
He said that Ford needs the
farm vote to win. The top 20
farm states have 267 electoral
votes, two short of the number
needed for victory.
"If I can help him with that,
I will do everything I can. I
am extremely fond of President
Ford," Butz said in an inter-
view.
BUT HE SAID he has not,

made up his mind whether to
campaign and may discuss it
with the President's campaign
staff.
Butz also said reports that he
and John Knebel tried three
years ago to slow down enforce-
ment of civil rights laws are
"totally wrong ... 180 degrees
wrong." Knebel, former under-
secretary of agriculture, now
is acting secretary.
Butz, in the interview, de-
clined to discuss the racial
slur that caused the furor or
the thinking that went into his
decision to resign Monday aft-
er five years in the Cabinet.
"I'VE TAKEN MY medicine
and I'm going to just let it sit,"
he said.
Asked if some Republican
criticism of his campaign plans
make him think he might be
an albatross around Ford's neck,
he said: "I've not discussed this
with the President. I've not dis-
cussed this yet with any of the
President's advisers ... I want
to assess that."
Butz said he still plans to keep
most of his long-scheduled ap-
pearances at GOP fundraisers
and to make speeches for con-
gressional candidates.
THE 67-YEAR-OLD former'
secretary said he expected to
finish clearing out his office
Wednesday and not return.
He said that, while depressed
over the weekend, "once I de-
cided Sunday to resign I felt
better and I'm back on my
feet, ready to go."
The Los Angeles Times this
week carried two articles quot-
ing unnamed United States De-

vote
partment of Agriculture (USDA)
sources who alleged that Butz
and Knebel, then general coun-
sel, aided state Extension Ser-
vice officials from seven South-
ern and Midwestern states in
1973 in circumventing compli-
ance with civil rights laws.
BOTH BUTZ and Knebel and
others attending a 1973 meet-
ing on the hiring of blacks and
other minorities denied the alle-
gations.
"In the first place, it wasn't
a secret meeting. It was an open
meeting. We hadn't publicized
it a great deal but anybody
could attend," Butz said Wed-
nesday.
He listed numerous officials
present from USDA headquar-1
ters with the state officials. "I
called the meeting and I said,
look, we've been monkeying
around long enough on this
thing. I want to see some ac-
tion. Let's get an action pro-
gram and let's get it rolling."
BUTZ ALSO reviewed USDA
employment figures for perma-
nent, full-time workers, from
janitors to the top career posi-
tions, during his tenure.
Total employment declined 4.5
per cent, or 3,748 persons, while
the number of blacks at USDA
rose from 5,517, or 6.58 per cent,
in November 1971 to 5,994, or
7.48 per cent, this June.
Government-wide, black em-
ployment is just under 17 per
cent. No blacks hold top career
jobs at USDA in the 18-grade
ladder above GS15 except for
four black men at GS16, the
records show.
"We're at a low level at Ag-
riculture, it's true," Butz said.
"I think there's a reason, in the
main, we have professional ag-
riculturalists. Until a few years
ago, young black students that
went to college didn't take ag-
riculture ... they used college
training as a means of escaping
the farm.
"We're also low on the per-
centage of women, one of the
lowest in government, but,
again, women have not entered
colleges of agriculture to study
until just recently."

BOSTON (R) - Medical researchers say
they have found the first direct evidence in
nonalcoholic males that drinking alcohol re-
duces the production of testosterone - the
hormone that gives men masculine charac-
teristics.
It has long been know that men may be
relatively impotent after drinking, and al-
coholics completely impotent - even after
they stop drinking.
Testosterone governs such male sexual
characteristics as sperm production and fac-
ial and body hair. Without it boys could not
undergo puberty.
RESEARCHERS FROM several institutions
in New York City conducted tests on 11 male
volunteers. Each volunteer was given a lit-
tle more than an ounce of alcohol every
three hours around the clock - not enough
to make them drunk. All were given enough
to eat.
Testosterone in the blood was measured
in four of the men 24 days after the start of
the drinking. In three, the concentration had
fallen by 29 to 55 per cent.
The fourth man had quickly developed an
upset stomach and was cut to one-third the
alcohol given others. His testosterone stayed
normal.
TWO OTHER MEN were tested at the
fifth day. In one, testosterone had fallen by

Sultan goes
shopping; $1.5
million worth

27 per cent. In the other it had fallen only
slightly.
All six men were described as "social
drinkers," normally drinking no more than
2.7 ounces of alcohol a week.
A report on the research appears in
Thursday's issue of the weekly New England
Journal of Medicine.
IN THEIR DISCUSSION, the authors, led
by Dr. Gary Gordon of the New York Medi-
cal College, noted that other hormonal chan-
ges seen in patients with alcohol - caused
cirrhosis, a liver disease, were not seen in
their normal subjects.
"Possibly, more chronic exposure to al-
cohol for a period of months to years would
be necessary to produce these changes,"
the authors said.
The doctors measured another hormone
produced in a different part of the body in
the other five men involved in the research
and said the production level of this hor-
mone had not declined. The doctors said
this indicated the alcohol was acting directly
on the testicles.
In an editorial commenting on the work,
Drs. David E. Van Thiel and Roger Lester of
the University of Pittsburgh School of Medi-
cine said, "The clinical effects of alcohol
ingestion on male sexual function are overt.
Corresponding changes in women have a
more subtle function."
They said they had no result yet from
studies of women and alcohol.

ROLLING MEADOWS, Ill. (o)
- The shopping list read like
a sultans ransom. Fittingly, the
Sultan of Oman was doing the
$1.5 million in shopping and,
paying the $194,500 to charterj
a Boeing 747 cargo jet to bring;
home the goods.
Qabus Bin Said, sultan of the;
oil-rich country on the south-
eastern coast of the Arabian
peninsula, placed the order sev-
eral months ago with Tom Oga-1
ra, director of merchandising;
for Maloney Coach Builders in
this Chicago suburb. Ogara left
with the cargo Monday. His of-
fice said yesterday that the sul-
tan's list included:
Six Cadillac Sevilles, a Cadil-
lac Eldorado, six Mercedes-
Benz sedans, a 25-foot speed-
boat, a Chevrolet Blazer, a Tar-
ga Porsche, a 911-S Porsche,
1,255 pieces of new luggage,
eight refrigerators, a gas range,
20,000 pounds of automotive
tools, two five-foot-high grape-
fruitntrees and two La-Z-Boy
reclining chairs.
"IT'S THE LARGEST order
we've ever had, of course,"
said Mary Jo Drakle, Maloney
office manager. "The order
placed through the sultan's
aides designated the makes of
cars and added: 'Please buy
me the best refrigerators, lug-
gage, gas range available.' No
reason was given why he want-

ed the grapefruit trees."
Drakle said extensive work
was done on some of the autos.
"The Sevilles were extended by
seven inches. Cabinetry was
built into them, bars and writ-
ing desks, and they were lined
with mouton (baby lamb)," she
said. "Two of the cars were
armor-plated with bullet-proof
glass. The Eldorado was paint-
ed gold and red on a green
background with a logo with
a serpent motif."
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236 NickelsbArcade
Ann Arbor
GUITAR CLASSES
By Dr. Nelson Amos,
Instructor of Guitar
Eastern Michigan
University
* A comphrensive
approach to music
reading and right-
hand technique.
Twelve weeks of
instruction in basic
classical and folk
guitar.
One-hour lessons
meeting weekly from
5:30-6:30 p.m.
* Reasonable rates.
For information call:
662-5888 (Daily 10-6)
or
485-0310 (evenings)

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Order your subscription today to...

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Butz

Daily Official Bulletin
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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
Thursday, October 7, 1976
Day Calendar
Ext. Serv: Education for Living:
Preventing Family Problems &
Breakdown; The Art of Listening:
Thoughts, Feelings & Skills that
Make it Successful; Problem Preg-
nancy Counseling with Adolescents
& Their Families; Assertion Train-
ing Intro; League, 8:30 am; Phar-
macy Centennial Celebration & Fall
Program, registration Rackham, 8:30
am.
Pharmacy: Centennial Celebra-
tion, opening session; Rackham
Lee Hall, 9:30 am.
WUOM: Shirley Temple Black
speaks at Nat'l Press Club in
Wash, DC; 10 am.
Ctr Human Growth & Develop:
Karen; Day Care for a Kibbutz Tod-
dler; 1025 Angell, 11 am.
AAUP: W H G Armytage (Shef-
field Univ, England) "The Modern
University at Risk," U Club, noon.
Pendleton Arts Ctr: "Open
Hearth" Series "Otello Preview,"
Pendleton R~m, Union, noon.
Behavorial Science: Penelope Ec-
kert "Language," 231 Angell, 1 pm.
Pharmacy: "Pharmacy Educa-
tion,:" "Pharmacy Practice," Rack-
ham Lec Hall, 1:30.
Geology/Mineralogy: Henry N.
Pollack 'Therma Evolution of the
Lithosphere," 4001 C C Little, 4
pm.
Music Schl: Philharmonia, Clark
Suttle conductor; Hill Aud, 8 pm.

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVII, No. 25
Thursday, October 7, 1976
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
Published d a iil y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day th-ugh Saturday morning.
Subse i n rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor: 50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor

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TONIGHT
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McCabe and Mrs. Miller
7 & 9:15
Pauline Koel aptly describes it as "a beautiful pipe
dream of a movie-a fleeting, almost diaphanous vision
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being one of the major American films of his decade.
Photographed by Vilmos Zigsmond, music by Leonard
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Beatty, Julie Christie, Rene Auberjonois.
$1.25, AUD. A ANGELL HALL

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$4.50-$5.50 -$6.50
Reserved Seats Available
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11:30 - 5:30 Monday - Friday
763-2071
for mail order details
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sorry, no personal checks

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STUDENTS!
The Peer Counselors in Assertiveness Training
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FREE ON-GOING GROUP
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IT WILL FEATURE:
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COMPLAINTS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS
10 a.m.-2 p.m.
CLASSIFIED ADS-764-0557
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MONDAY thru FRIDAY-9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Deadline for Sunday issue-
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