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October 05, 1976 - Image 9

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-05

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Tuesday, October 5, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Tuesday, October 5, 19Th THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

1 I I

THOMAS TO BE NEXT?

Inside Straight
ndy Glazer_
Fit to be tied . .
noti the WolverinesI
Two weeks ago the Michigan State Spartans were on the
verge of a rousing come-from-behind victory over North Carolina
State. Behind most of the way, the Spartans scored to bring it
to 31-31, held the Wolfpack, got the ball back and marched down- '
field.
Fifty-eight seconds remained when the Spartans faced a
fourth and two at midfield. A first down and perhaps 12 more
yards would bring Michigan State kicker Hans Nielsen into
range.
The Spartans punted and settled for a tie.
Last week, Ohio entertained UCLA down in Columbus.
"Entertained" fits nicely. With the score 10-10 and less
than three minutes remaining, the Buckeyes ran seven
straight running plays to reach a fourth and four situation
at the UCLA 48. Again, less than a minute remained.
Ohio State punted and settled for a tie.
"Settled for a tie." What a meaningless phrase. What a
meaningless action.
"You writers have gotten so used to winning that now it's
not if we win but how we win," said Michigan coach Bo Schem-
bechler at yesterday's press luncheon. "The important thing is
to win, that's all that matters."
Not a word about the worth of trying to be found. The
only teams that ever get worked up about sister-kissing are
those that are huge underdogs, like Baylor and Stanford were
to Michigan last year. Their ties achieved a measure of par-
ity with a clearly superior team.
Yet Baylor coach Grant Teaff was upset after his team's 14-14
stalemate with the Blue, saying that his team "should have won
the game."~
But Michigan State was a 12 point favorite over the then-
winless Wolfpack. All the Spartans settled for was a measure of
parity with a clearly inferior team. Not much to write home
about.T
The Buckeyes of OSU, despite being ranked beneath UCLA,
were four to eight point favorites while playing on their own c
field. All the Buckeyes settled for was their second straight1
non-win at home and no revenge whatsoever over the team that
knocked the national title rug out from under their feet.c
It may or may not be insignificant that these two bold,e
brave teams are in the midst of seasons less successful than I
expected. If the coach isn't bold, confident and aggressive he
can hardly expect his team to be that way.
"If we had tied Ohio State last year we would have won aF
fifth consecutive Big Ten title," said Schembechler, "but we stillt
would have gone to the Orange Bowl, due to a rule that I don'tI
like."t
Schembechler was refirring to the Big Ten rule that sendss
the conference-title tying team with the better non-conference
record to the Rose Bowl. He feels it is unfair different teamst
play non-conference teams of unequal straths. For example,
while Michigan was toying with Navy ar Wake Forest, OSU
faced Missouri and UCLA.
"So with an undefeated season and a conference title to be
lost, we gambled and wound up losing," continued Schembechler.
"That should tell you what I think about tying."
Ties were far from the only topic of the luncheon, how-
ever. Other topics were, predictably, the number one rank-
ing and the Michigan passing game, and, less predictably,
Michigan fullback Rob Lytle.
Lytle excels
"Lytle's playing great ball," said Schembechler. "Do yout
guys appreciate him like I do? He does something every snap.
As an all-around back-blocking, running, and receiving, he
might be the best I've ever had."
Lytle'scotributions havebeen lost in the speedy bursts of
Harlan Huckleby, Russell Davis, Jim Smith and Rick Leach,
but the undersized fullback has been offensive champion of the
week twice already this year (including this week).
Lytle's performance was one of the few offensive bright
spots against Wake Forest. Perhaps the most dismal note was
the infamous Michigan passing game. Rick Leach completed six
of fourteen passes - three to Michigan and three to Wake For-
est.
"We're not going to lose faith in our passing game," said
Schembechler. "I want to throw my 14-15 passes a game."
But Bo realizes there is work to be done. When asked about
Michigan State's aerial attack, Schembechler joked, "I think
it's unfair of you to ask me about someone else's passing attack
when I don't have one of my own."
The inevitable number questions were asked, of course.
"If you win you don't worry about votes," said Schembech-
ler. "Nothing has changed since we became number one. But the
polls have their point.
"You and I know No. 1 creates interest," continued

Schembechler. "I suppose it's like those teeny-boppers . . .
no, they don't call them that anymore ... teenagers and their
top ten jazz hits . . . or folk or rock or whatever it is that
they listen to these days."
But the overriding subject of the day was Michigan State.
"This is what college football is all about, "two great uni-
versities meeting like this," said Schembechler, cracking his
hands together.
And you can be sure that when Schembechler's hands crack
together on Saturday, they won't be urging the Wolverines on
to a tie. The only ones fit to be tied may be MSU fans.

Forzano

By The Associated Press
PONTIAC - Rick Forzano,
the embattled head coach of!
the Detroit Lions whose job had1
been on the line for the past
few weeks, submitted his res-1
ignation yesterday to William
Clay Ford, owner of the Na-
tional Football League club.
The team made the announce-
ment in a brief statement and'
said Forzano's successor will.
be named at a news confer-
ence on Tuesday.
Ford had suggested beforet
the Atlanta game that he
wouldn't fire Forzano without
firing general manager Russ
Thomas. There was no imme-
diate indication Monday of
Thomas' fate.

at 2:30 this afternoon
was no indication
anything was going t
he said.
He said Forzano
team several weeksr
no intention of resig
player also said he d
anything about Tho
us, but added: "I
agine Russ Thoma
ing."
"He was a difficul
understand," another
of Forzano. "You kn
under a lot more pr
was made public."
The only member o
staff with head co
perience in the NF
Shipp, the offensive4
and coach of the qt

resignS
and there and receivers. He was interim
then that head coach of the New York
o happen," Jets for the last five games last
season, after Charley Winner
told the was fired and before Lou Holtz
ago he had was hired.
gning. The
idn't know Forzano was a Detroit as-
mas' stat- sistant when Don McCafferty,
can't im- the head coach, died of a
as resign- heart attack July 28, 1974.
Forzano was named to re-
place him Aug. 3.
t person to
r Lion said His 24-year coaching career
ow, he was has included assistant coaching
essure than jobs with St. Louis and Cincin-
nati of the NFL. The Ohio na-
f the Lions' tive was also a high school
aching ex- coach in Akron and coached at
FL is Ken the University of Connecticut
coordinator before becoming head coach at
uarterbacks the Naval Academy.

It is also unknown whether1-____
Ford asked Forzano to resign
or if the former U.S. Naval
Academy coach made the move
strictly on his own.

I -19M

AP Photo
MINNESOTA VIKING'S DEFENDER, linebacker Jeff Siemon, is too late to stop Pittsburgh's
tight end Bernie Cunningham as Cunningham goes high for a touchdown pass from Terry
Bradshaw in first quarter action last night. The effort by Cunningham was not enough, how-
ever, as the Vikings went on to win 17-6.
PITTSBURGH LOOSES THIRD:

AlIlen
By The Associated Press
BLOOMINGTON, Minn.-Cor-
nerback Nate Allen intercepted
a pass and recovered a fum-
ble, paving the way for a pair
of touchdown bursts by Chuck
Foreman that paced the Minne-
sota Vikings to a 17-6 victory
over Pittsburgh's reeling Steel-
ers in the National Football
League game last night.
ALLEN'S INTERCEPTION of
a second-period pass by Pitts-
burgh's Terry Bradshaw setup
Foreman's eight-yard sweep
through the right side of the
Pittsburgh line that helped put
the unbeaten Vikings ahead to
stay.
And in the opening minutes of
the fourth quarter, after Allen
The Top 20

ignites
had recovered a fumbled snap
of an attempted Pittsburgh
punt, Foreman bulled and
twisted his way four yards for
the clinching touchdown.
The Vikings went all the way
with Bob Lee at quarterback,
benching Fran Tarkenton as a
starter due to injury-bruised
ribs suffered eight days ago -
for the first time in his 16-year
National Football League ca-
reer.
LEE FAILED to generate
much offense. It was mostly
Foreman's doing. He rushed for

a career-high 148 yards. But it
was Pittsburgh's mistakes that
ultimately handed the two-time
Super Bowl champions their
third loss in four games this
year.
Bradshaw was intercepted
four times and the Steelers also
lost the ball twice on fumbles,,
swelling their season turnovers
to 16 in four games.
The lone score for the Steel-
ers in the nationally televised
game came in the first period
on a one-yard pass from Brad-
show to rookie tight end Bennie
Cunningham.

A prominent Lions player,
who asked that he not be identi-
fied, said he was surprised by
the resignation.
"We had a regular meeting
Wt t. T ff(ewVa
fa s &c46~#
ot 6 om ,/, Si
CWMAW Lf dWLA

I

Engineering
Graduates
Winter & Spring
John Deere, the world's largest producer
of argriculturol equipment as well as a
growing line of industrial and consumer
products will be on campus:
OC"vOBER 12TH
To discuss Career Opportunities in the
following areas:
Industrial Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
We want to meet with Candidates who
have appropriate Bachelor's or Master's
degrees in Industrial or Mechanical
Engineering.
We offer the selected applicants excel-
lent startina salaries, a complete. em-
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where Your advancement is limited only
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To meet with our Reoresentatives. con-
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information.
JOHN DEERE
An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F

tuM w, snntA ~puM
Cottage INN
LwA- Aor4.MW.
512 E. Williams Ann Arbor
663-3379

By the UPI
1. MICHIGAN (40) 4-0.
2. Pittsburgh (2) 4-0..........
3. Oklahoma 4-0........
4. Georgia 4-0....
5. Nebraska 3-0-1.
6. U.C.L.A. 3-0-1..............
7. Maryland 4-0..............
8. Kansas 4-0...............
9. Missouri 3-1 ....
10. Southern California 3-1.
11. Ohio State 2-1-1............
12. Notre Dame 3-1. .........
13. Florida 3-1................
14. Texas 2-i
15. Arkansas 3-1. .........
16. Texas A&MI 3-1 ............ .
17. Boston College 3-0
18. Texas Tech 2-0.............
19. Houston 2-1...............
20. Tulsa 4-1..................

408
315
306
279
226
212
122
113
99
60
58
15
15
9
8
6
4
2

NIELSEN'S
Homegrown Plant Sale
F E R N S: 3 F'teris Varieties, Holly
Fern, Maiden Hair, Korean Maiden
Hair, Boston Fern.
All in 6" pots-56.00 Value
Jade plants in 5" pots-$3.50 Value
All 11.99 each
Plus, you'll find our great selection
of FOLIAGE AND BLOSSOMING
PLANTS at our everyday low green-
house prices.
COME SEE US TODAY!
NIELSEN'S
FLOWERS and GREENHOUSE
1021 Maiden Lane
Ann Arbor, MI-994-6112
HOURS: Monday-Friday 8:30-5:00
Saturday 8:30-4:00
Sunday 10:30-12:00 Noon
FREE PARKING_ _

I
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fI

-COUPON-

2 for 1 Special

-COUPON-

I

Buy 1 Super Salad-GET 1 FREE
Good: Tuesday thru Thursday
October 5,6, 7

® ®m®® ®O it X11 r

NOT AVAILABLE FOR CARRY OUT
GOOD AFTER 3 P.M. ONLY

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THE GAME
TOO TOUGH
FOR A LOT
OF PEOPLE
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at the
UNION

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Ann Arbor, Mich.
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' 1w mn epe
do yoU kno who ae
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Almost everybody knows someone who
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By.availing themselves of the most effec-
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By advances made through cancer research.
Research made possible with the help of the

: i

Thanksgiving
Break
Savings!

TRAVEL OFFICE
2nd floor Union
OPEN M-F 10-4
CALL 763-2147

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BOSTtIN 10

American Cancer Soci
However, there's
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more people, the
American Cancer
Society needs more
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give. We want to

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