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October 05, 1976 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Arts & Entertainment Tuesday October 5 1 976

Benny

excites

By LORAN WALKER big bands in the best form
through Dixieland and hot jazz
HE BENNY GOODMAN con- licks. He iet expectations as
cert Saturday night was a true veteran performer who
everything a jazz groupie could kicked out a mean rendition ofj
have wished for, as a well- every solo he played.
rounded group of musicians Benny then returned to an-
treated the near sell-out audi- swer a resounding call of 'en-
ence at Hill Aud. to classics core' 'with a ten-minute, all out
old and new. rendition of "Sing, Sing, Sing,"
The first half hour was a bringing the house down 'once'
showcase of current popular more. So what could he follow
tunes excellently turned out by it with but his closing theme-

John Bunch (piano), Connie Kay
(drums), Cal ~Cpllins (guitar),
and Keter Betts on'bass. Each
gave a solo performance in a
true jazz style, bringing out a
line of original musical thought.
Then Benny came on-to play,;
starting with an old favorite,
"Air Mail Special." He played:
each tune in a style true to his
own work, and proved that he
is still one of the top musicians
in jazz.-
BUT EVEN THE "King of
Swing" is aging a bit, and aft-
er romping around the stage
for about half a song, he had{
to pull out a bench to sit on.;
Warren Vache, a young and
talented trumpet player, fol-
lowed Goodman with aemellow
version of "I Can't Get Start-
ed." Although a mere fledgling
compared to his more seasoned
comrades, Vache held his own
throughout the performance. He
hit the high notes with a true
clarity, fullness and body that
would be envied by any trum-
pet virtuosc
ouaay Tate was last to ap ;
pear. Tate isa sax player who
played with Count Basie's band
for many years; and his style
brought back memories of the

"Goodbye" - ending another
great performance by some of
the most extremely talented mu-
sicians in the jazz business.
" Note: Reviewer Loran Walk-
er was able to arrange with the
University Musical Society to
interview the 'King'. Here are
the results.
Q. In your.book you take a;
rather hard look at commercial
bands like Lombardo, White-

whatever you like. This is a
great age of commerciality.
What do you hear when you
turn on the radio? Radio tells
people what to buy. The Beatles
were good. The Rolling Stones,
Grateful Dead are more inter-.
ested in record and movie gross-;
es. The record companies are
a big bureaucratic set-up.
Q. I've noticed that the R.C.A.-
Pablo records have been re-
cording some of the veterans of
jazz like Count Basie and Louie
Bellson. Why not you?
A. I have my reservations. I
want to make records where I
want to make records. I have
my own ideas. Just wait - I
have some records in cans now.
You have to look really hard
and wide to find good mate-
rial. Everything today is writ-
ten by ten minute writers.
Songs come and go. Song's like
"Basin Street Blues" should be
revived. I've got 15 arrange-
ments of these old songs I have-
n't recorded yet, but I will.
Q. In 1956 the movie "The

runs
think this movie accurately por-
trayed your life?
A. The movie was terrible.
Luckily there was music in it
-to tighten up the slack. Should
have dealt more with race rela-
tions.
Q. Why weren't you used as
the lead?
A. I would have done just as
bad as he did. (Referring to
Steve Allen).
Q. Why don't you have a big
band anymore?
A. It'd be impossible. If you
want a big band you've got to
play every night - just to stay
in shape. You've got to have
charts. I've got no time to re-
hearse. It'd be physically im-
possible for me. We decide on
what we play. I played with~
Louis Bellson's band last sum-
mer. It really wasn't good
enough. Too many guys" kept
substituting themselves. Louie
Bellson, though, is very good.
Q. Do you see any future in
jazz?
A. It's here! It always has
been.

man, and Kay Kyser. Do you Be
feel that you've always stayed ma
away from commerciality in
jazz?
A. What do you think? I've
always used 1st class musicians
who just know how to play.
Q. Do you feel musicians are
losing the flair for jazz? Dwel-
ling too much on discipline? C
A. I'm all for that. There's a
generation gap between me anda
a lot of things. I won't fight it. So
Q. How about Bill Watrous ! per
(trombone player) or Maynard..n
Ferguson? i
A. Watrous, franky not to my T
personal taste. Ferguson is not alw
my cup of tea. To each his own, A
Cr

nny Goodman Story" was
ade. Looking back, do you

Criss LPs contrast
By LARRY FRISKE sent his first undertaking after
a six-year layoff.
Crisscraft (Muse 5068) and i
irm & Sunny (ABC ASD-9312), Crisscraft, delightfully finish-
nny Criss's latest LPs, are a ed in the traditional jazz quar-
rfect contrast and a prime tet form, is pure joy. It leads
ample of two diverse trends off with the Latin flavor of
much of today's music. "The Isle of Celia," which fea-
The alto work of Criss is tures extended soloing from
vays tasteful and ingenious. Criss and his band. "Blues In
direct descendant of Bird My Heart" and "All Night
iss is as natural and logical Long" showcase the melodic,
improviser as anyone around.: bluesy Criss and it's beautiful.
The title track takes it out
[HE NEW RECORDS repre- with a sparkling uptempo blues.
On the other hand, Warm &d
Sunny attempts to incorporate:
all the slick producing, arrang-a
s ing, and technical tricks avail-
able to the ABC studios. In ad-
dition to the basic quin'tet, en-V
tire sections of strings and. t
horns are manipulated. Needlesst
TONIGHT AT 7 & 9 to say, there's little room leftr
OPEN 6:45 for Criss improvisations. Andi
the material is almost straight:
Paramount Picturespresents pop., including "The Way We,
. A t AWere" and "Memories."F

Daily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS
Vassar Clements winces, frowns and scowls in agonized ecstacy as he fiddles his way through an evening at Power
Center last Friday night. Other performers included his band, folk guitarist Steve Goodman, and - in a surprise
appearance - song-writer John Prine.
UJAC CONCERT:

ORSON WELLES' 1941
CITIZEN KANE
This film masterpiece stands apart-it rests at
the head of more "top ten" lists than any other
motion picture. It is one of the few examples of
uncompromised work to emeroe from Holly-
wood. It shines with talent inc' ding Welles as
Charles Foster Kane. With Jose' Ih Cotten and
l Agnes Moorehead,
WED: Bergman's WILD STRAWBERRIES
CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AU.5
7:0&9:05 Admission $1.25

an
T

r

Steve,
By JIM STIMSON
TEVE GOODMAN and the:
Vassar Clements Band were
having such a good time Fri-'
day night that John Prine'
couldn't resist getting in on the
act.
The show opened with the
Vassar Clements Band. With
the exception of Vassar himself,
they looked like your average
rock band - But there the sim-
ilarity ended. The group of Dave
Perkins (electric guitar), Rich-
ard Price (electric bass), Bob'
Hogan (piano), and Dave "Hash

E

Brown "Humphrey (drums)
seemed equally at ease with
jazz, blues, and even boogie.
Clements warmed the crowd,
immediately with his broad grin:
and dazzling fiddle-playing.
During his solos he wore a'
comical grimace, looking as if,
he was' either fighting the fid-
dIe or receiving divine inspira-
tion.
THE MUSIC started with easy
swing, reminiscent of Django
Rhinehart and Stephane Grapel-
ly. Clements' playing seemsbto
bridge successfully the gap be-
tween jazz and bluegrass fid-
dle styles.
The pace then quickened for
"Barnyard Blues" from Cle-.
ments' '75 album Superbow. Hisj
simultaneous fiddling and back-,
woods vocalizing drew both.'
laughter and applause from the'
audience. The next number was
"Vassar's Boogie" (also from
Superbow), and it was a for-
real boogie.
The set concluded with the
bluegrass favorite "Orange
Blossom Special," punctuated
by a sprightly shuffle by Cle-
ments during his solo. The band
then exited to thunderous ap-
plause.

G in color AParamount Picture

WHEN STEVE GOODMAN,
the "Little Big Man," entered
he was so loose and full ofE
energy that his first few songsi
were accompanied by Peter,
Townshend-like jumps and hops.'
His vibrant acoustic guitar play-J
ing and topical lyrics establish-
ed instant, communication with
the crowd. Goodman performed,
among others, the songs fromt
his recent album Words Yous
Can Dance To, "Between thet
Lines" and "Unemployed." The
biggest laugh of the night cam,
at the end of "Unemployed,
when Goodman predicted Jerryt
Ford as the next member of the
welfare rolls.
The genial Goodman was join-
ed by the Vassar Clements
Band, and they lulled the crowd'
with Goodman's "City of New
Orleans."'They then proceeded
to rock the house with a rous-
ing rendition of "Johnny B.
Goode."
CLEMENTS' guitarist, Dave
Perkins, played the parts of
Hank Williams' "Hey, Goodt
Looking" and Chuck Berry's
"Johnny B. (koode" with equal
ease, and skill.
Bob Hogan's acoustic pianoJ
playing seemed more jazz-ori-t

whoop it, up,

ented than the rest of the per-
formers. He seemed a little out
of place, although he never got
in the way of Clements' play-
ing or GoodmaA's singing. At
times his solos reflected the in-
fluence of modern pianists like
Cecil Taylor.
As the band left the stage,
the audience called for an en
core. What no one expected was
that goodman would return not
with Clements' band but with
longtime friend and edllabora-.
tor John Prine.
PRINE, EN'ROUTE to an ap-
pearance in Toronto, seemed
only too happy. to join in. Prine's'
and Goodman's guitarwork has
a rapport that only comes from
years of playing together, and
of cours. they have. Prine's
vocals on "Paradise" had that
folksy, intimate quality of Wood-
ie Guthrie or a young Bob Dy-
lan.
Not a person left the Power
Center that night disappointed.
But of everyone who was there,
it looked as though the perform-
ers had the best time of all, and
maybe that's the way it ought
to be.

1

-'T ! T w

h

ONE COMPLETE SHOW
TONIGHT AT 7:00
OPEN 6:45
A WOMAN
UNDER THE
INFLUENCE (R)
PLUS
ALICE DOESN'T
LIVE HERE
ANYMORE

NEWS FROM THE
MAJOR EVENTS OFFICE
Try this one on your roommates . what are
the 3 all time biggest selling albums in Detroit
history? Bet they don't guess Bob Seger, for the
No. 1 and No. 3 honors (especially if your room-
mate is from New Jersey). The No. 2 top seller,
Abbey Road, is sandwiched in there between Live
Bullet and Beautiful Loser.
If you were one of the hapy folks who caught
Carole King's second night concert last January
in Hill Aud., you might be interested to know why
it took so long for her to return for an encore.
While a full house audience sustained a 4 minute
standing ovation, Ms. King was backstage trying
to separate' her boyfriend and Danny Kootch (her
longtime friend and leader of her band), who
were having a pretty physical altercation. Evi-
dently brewing tensions developed into something
a bit more substantial just as Carole and the band
left the stage. Carole patched things up and re-
turned to her cheering fans explaining all with
one sentence: "All I can say is 'Only Love Is
Real'" . . . the title of her solo encore number.
Ann Arbor was one of only 6 cities played by
this terrif lady and superstar after a 3 year
absence from the concert stage. The absence
didn't seem to dull album sales since Tapestry has
been on Billboard's Top 200 chart for 5 years
straight . . . some kind of record. ,
We are very proud to announce the upcoming
performance of the magnificent jazz guitarist,
GEORGE BENSON, on the evening of Wednes-
day, Oct. 13 at Hill Auditorium. Reminescent of
the late Wes Montgomery, Big Bad George not
only has won a Grammy nomination and the Play-
boy All Star Poll. Additionally, his album Breezin'
achieved the rare feat of holding the top spot on
all three Billboard charts (pop, jazz, r&b{ simul- ,

The Dead rock Cobo Hall

!tI

TONIGHT AT 7 & 9
OPEN 6:45
THE STANLEY KUBRICK
FILM FESTIVAL
"* "
COMING FRIDAY
Barry Lyndon
(PG)

(Continued from Page 5) t
did come through didn't sound3
particularly exciting; it never'
really expanded the basic struc-
ture of the music, as did Gar-
cia's guitar and the rhythm sec-:
tion.
BY THE END of the first set3
the Dead appeared confident.
"The Music Never Stopped"
was played strongly with Gar-t

cia space-riffing into intermis-
sion.
What do rock stars discuss
during halftime? It must have
been a pep talk of sorts,hbe-
cause the Dead's performance
was considerably better after
intermission, capturing the spir-
it, if not the letter, of the Dead.
Starting with "Playing in the
Band," the group flowed through
a virtual travelogue of expres-

.1

I

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Professional Theatre Program
GUEST ARTIST SERIES
USHER APPLICATION

ANN AIQUiADL [1L44CCM(I1
TONIrGHT !
FELLI NI SATYRICON
7 and 9:15
(Federico Fellini, 1970)
Based on some of the remaining fragments of the world's
first novel by Gaius Petronius, arbiter elegantiae to Nero's
court, Fellitni follows the picaresque adventures of two hand-
some pagan hippies. ROME BEFORE CHRIST-AFTER FEL-
LINI. "A blockbuster of virtuosity from director Fellini, whd
conjures up an overwhelming, imaginative journey through the
mire of ancient Rome."-Cue Magazine. Italian with subtitles.
ROME BEFORE CHRIST-AFTER FELLINI
$1.25, AUD. A A GELL HALL

sions including the Rascals hit
I "Gvod Lovin'," Martha and the
Vandella's "Dancing in the
Street," "If the Thunder Don't
Get Ya, .and Lightning Will,"
and the old Rolling Stones hit
"Fade Away," all .peppered
with extended jams and drum
solos.
SPIRALLING like a cork-
screw, the ideas became vig-
nettes interupted by spasms of
coherency. While Garcia lost
himself in his inspirations and
picked his way through mental
thickets, the others worked on
establishing foundations. Drum-
-mers Bill Kreutzman and Mic-
key Hart purred, swished and
splashed, keeping their feet as
close to the ground as possible
without touching.
EACH SONG in the excursion,
was abandoned as abruptly as
it was started. On more than
one occasion the music stalled,
only to be pulled back like taffy
into cohesiveness. Froth orig-
inal material to cover songs,
the odyssey paralled, in many
ways, rock's own evolution.
No "Truckin," no "Casey
Jones," not even an encore-
just four hours of good live
Dead.

NAME---
ADDRESS -
TELEPHONE.

__Uof M I.
RULES

1. You must be a U of M student.
2, You must choose your series in order of preference.
3. Married students may send applications together.
4. The application MUST BE POSTED BY U.S. MAIL.
Mail to: Usher, Guest Artist Series, Mendelssohn Theatre,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
5. Include a stamped, self-addressed envelope.
PLEASE NUMBER CHOICE 1, 2, 3 etc.
CHOICEr
_HC SERIES-A: Wed., Oct. 13; Tues., Nov. 23; Wed., Feb. 16; Wed., A
~-.SERIES B: Thurs., Oct. 14; Wed., Nov. 24; Thurs., Feb. 17; Thurs.
FRIFS C: Fri. Oct. 15: Fri., Nov. 26: Fri.. Feb. 18; Fri., Apr. 15

IMPORTANT GRADUATION
INFORMATION
Seniors and Grad Students graduating this December, April or next
December MUST MAKE appointments now to have yearbook gradua-
tion portraits done. These pictures are absolutely FREE this year. Make
your appointment on the D I A G between 10-4 daily, or call the

.pr. 13
, Apri. 14

I

II

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