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October 01, 1976 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-10-01

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday. October 1 1976

,ar 1 r J '-w

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SUN BAKERY
NOW OPEN
* Whole Grain Breads
* Danish Pastryl
" Real Cream Eclairs
* Fresh Colombian Coffee
* Special Order Cakes
Coate See our new home

DEATH LINKED TO DRUG SCANDAL:
Police shooting called suicide

Legislature clears
Detroit transit bill

-

By AP and Renter
DETROIT (AP) - Deputy
Police Chief Reginal Harvel
killed himself just hours after
a major department shakeup
which included the firing of
Detroit's police chief, a medi-
cal examiner said yesterday.
Harvel fired two .38-caliber
slugs into his own body Wed-
nesday, Wayne County's med-
ical examiner, Dr. Werner
Spitz, said after an autopsy.
"THERE IS ABSOLUTELY no
doubt it was suicide," Spitz said.
The shooting took place in Har-
vel's home on Detroit's west
side.
Police released few details of
their investigation into the dep-
uty chief's death. But sources
indicated Harvel was concern-
ed because of published reports'
last weekend which uncovered

an old link between Harvel and
Willie Clyde Volsan.
Volsan was described by some
sources as a witness before a
federal grand jury investigating
alleged ties between Detroit po-
lice and narcotics traffic in the'
city.
AIDES SAID Harvel never ap-
peared before the grand jury
and that his name was not men-
tioned in connection with the
case until last weekend.
The published reports indi-
cated Harvel's sister, Annie, for-
merly was married to Volsan,
a convicted gambler. The cou-'
ple was divorced 14 years ago
and Harvel told a Detroit Free
Press reporter he had little if
any contact with Volsan after
that.
Meanwhile, the first black
man ever to become police chief

in Detroit was sworn into of- month that a federal grand jury
fice yesterday. investigation of the city's nar-
THE NEW CHIEF, William cotics police has been secretly
Hart, a 24-year police veteran, under way for the past three
faces dissent from within the years, centering on the activi-
department and public skepti- ties of Executive Deputy Police
cism from without over the fed- Chief Frank Blount, a close
eral grand jury investigation friend of Mayor Young.
of narcotics payoffs to top po- TANNIAN had been aware of
lice officers. the investigation, but Mayor
The probe, coming on the Young and other top city offic-
heels of summer police layoffs ials had not, and the mrayor used
and increased street crime, has this as a pretext for dismissing'
tainted Mayor Coleman Young the police chief last Tuesday
and resulted in the dismissal and naming Hart as his replace-

301 E. LIBERTY

668-6320

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Business Staff

A

ANN AIQIA0U2 ILM CC-CU
TONIGHT in the MLB
ROBERT MITCHUM in
FAREWELL MY LOVELY
7 & 10:30 p.m.
Rumpled raincoats, downbeat patrer and lots of action make
1 anothet chapter in Raymond Chandler's saga of Philip Mar-
lowe-the first since THE LONG GOODBYE. Robert Mitchum
makes a perfect Marlowe and Charlotte Rampling is the best
moll in years! Better than the 1944 original (MURDER MY
SWEET), Mitchum and the sets are worth the price of ad-
mission! "FAREWELL MY LOVELY is the kind of movie
Bogart would have stood in line for."-Rex Reed, With Sylvia
MvIiles.
AND
NIGHT OF THE HUNTER
8.45 p.m. only
This bizarre horror film, the only film ever directed by
Laughton, stars Robert Mitchum as a murderous preacher.
.trying to terrorize his step-children into revealing the where-
abouts of some money. James Agee adapted the novel. Cine-
matographery by Stanley Cortez, who also photographed THE
MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS. Shelly -Winters, Lillian Gish.
"ONE OF THE MOST FRIGHTENING MOVIES EVER MADE."
-Pauline Kael.
TWO BY SAM PECKINPAH
BOB DYLAN in
Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid
7 P.M. ONLY
In the last days of the western frontier, there waged a
battlegbetween law and outlaw, age and youth, the people
putting up fences and the people cutting 'em down. Peckinpah
is at his best when he deals with the manifestation of these
battles: men at the end of their strings. On one level, a
violent, action-filled Western, on a deeper level a story of two
friends whose love for each other' is twisted by their rapidly
changing environment. Warm, convincing acting, great music
and, performance by Bob Dylan. "The whole film has a parched.
eerie splendor."-Time. James Coburn, Kris Kristofferson,
Richard Jackel and Rita Coolidge.
Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia
9 P.M.
Peckinpah moved to Mexico to shoot a film with complete
freedom from Hollywood restrictions and returned with this
brilliant, uninhabited black comedy. Senior Garcia has a
price on his head, and said head becomes, as Bogart says in
THE MALTESE FALCON, "The thing dreams are made of."
A, truly underrated film, it looks like it was shot by some
passionate cross betweer John Ford and Juis Bunuel. "Mag-
nificently Gothic western about a down and out piano player
who tries to gain his fortune by becoming a bounty hunter,
and by so doing finds hifself pursued into madness by the
furies of his own self-destructiveness. Sam Peckinipah at his
best."-Sight and Sound. Warren Oates, Isela Vega, Gig Young
and Kris Kristofferson.
$1.25, DOUBLE FEATURE $2.00

of the former chief, Phillip Tan-
nian.
Federal sources revealed last
Order
Your
Subscription.
Today
76 4-0558

ment.
Last month, Tannian placed
Blount on sick leave the day'
before a local newspaper, quot-
ing federal sources, made the
first public rep~ort on the probe.
Blount returned to his job a few
days later but last week began
an indefinite leave ofdabsence.
Also last week, federal and
police sources disclosed that the
probe centered on a bar former-
ly owned by Mayor Young and
his brother Charles, and a mo-
tor home parked at an east
side services station - both
frequented by Blount, other top.
police officers and known drug
traffickers.
The sources also said the two
locations were regularly visited
by Volsan, the mayor's broth-
er-in-law and reptedly a minor
figure in the city's massive num-
bers and drug rackets.

LANSING (UPI) - A long
'struggle to win legislative ap-
proval for a Detroit area bus
and rail mass transit plan has
finally ended in victory for
transit backers.
The measure cleared the
State House yesterday on a 65-
37 vote and was subsequently
sent to Gov. William Milliken
on a quick 29-4 Senate vote.
"THE PASSAGE of this legis-
lation indicates the growing
realization that the health of
Detroit is vital to all of
Southeastern Michigan and that
Southeastern Michigan is vital
to the rest of the state," Milli-
ken said.
"I commend members of both
parties in both houses from all
parts of the state for passage
of this legislation and I look
forward to a quick federal re-
spo"se to today's action."
The state is hoping that its
pledge to put up about $27
million, along with $13 million
in local funds, will generate
federal grants of $600 million
to $800 million.
MILLIKEN said Transoorta-
tion Secretary William Coleman
assured him that Michigan
would be provided "hundreds of
millions of dollars" toward the
program if it committed itself.t
Some estimates predict the
program could generate up to.

20,000 jobs for the economically
depressed city.
"The most pressing problem
facing out country today is the
revitalization of our cities and
practical public transportation
is a major factor in that re-
vitalization," the governor said.
Local funds would be raised
through an extra $$250 tax on
vehicle license plates and a $6
fee for vehicle title transfers in
Wayne, Oakland and Macomb
counties.
THE TAXING provi-
sions were the prime cause of
opposition mounted against the
plan by suburban Detroit law-
makers, one of whom claimed
it was unconstitutional and an-
nounced he would' ask Attorney
General Frank Kelley to rule on
the question.
The measire had been tied
ip in the House- since it was
soundly defeated in July. Its
oinnnrters. led by Ren. William
rvan, (D-Detroit) scratched up
the needd votes by offering
minor alternations and guaran-
tees designed to mollify indi-
vidual lawmakers.
A pronosed tax on real estate
transactions was abandoned in
the face of fierce opposition
from the real estate lobby. As-
snrances were built in to pro-
hibit the use of suburban funds
for a downtown "people mover"
and making fHnding of a sub-
wav subject to legislative ap-
nroval.

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MICHAE

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(Continued from Page 1)
lieves the movement must
come from the union camp.
"The contract demands they
have at this moment are con-
siderably beyond our means
and capabilities," he said.
Although Fleming still clings'
optimistically to hopes for an
agreement without a strike con-
frontation he admits most de-j
nartments in the University!
have been devising contingency
plans for keeping their wheels1
turning in the event of a walk-
out.
"THEY have been (prepar-
ing) for a long time, almost
literally since the last strike
took place,"'he said.
Reacting to the Administra-
tion's apparent preparedness,
Doug Moran, GEO president,,
began, "They say they are un-
concerned about the effects of
a strike - they believe that
they can take a strike . ."
"I would say, we'll see,"
Weinstein interjected. ,
HOWEVER, the low turnout,
at the union's first two mem-
bershi meetings of the season +
has cast the prospects for wide-,
scale support in a dubious light.i
"I think when the member-;
shin knows what the adminis-
tration came out with today
they will get mobilized and
ready," said Weinstein.
"Before we had the media-1
tion to devote our attention to,"{
fihe continued, "Now our prior-
itv is organizine for a strike."
BUT GEO Vice President:
\Tancv Kmshieinn did not echo
her colleaeues' strong confi-!
dence. "T will lrie them (union:
memhership) at the Oct. 5th ,
epting to take a strone nosi-
tion if it's a bie tirnnt bt ift
i's not and the tornaont's sma11K.
then it will be an entirely dif-
The n;-nt tinl i t t
The " -ntirelv different sitlfa-

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t
i
v
b
V
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s
n
c
f
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e
a
d
a
b
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5)
t7
A
4n
1
C
il
ti
a
c
ti
h

ion" could amount to alterna-
ives to a walk-out including
bringing in an arbitrator who
will eventually hand down a
binding decision, or inviting a
"fact finder" to investigate po-
itions and offer suggestions.
Neither adversary express
much faith in such tactics.
"IF YOU look at the past re-
ords, we (the University) re-
'sed binding arbitration and I
world say it would be highly
nilikely that the' University
would resort to that," Forsyth
aid. "I would say it may
ven be highly illegal," he add-
d, exnlaining that bringing i
third party to make the final
ecision would be usurping Re-
ental and executive powers to
preside over labor contract de-
isions.
"But even if it were legal,"
Forsvth continued, "I would
eriously question the ration-
lity of that."
Evaluating the possibility of
oth side calling for a fact
inder, Forsyth said, "The facts
eally aren't in disnte - we
isneree on resolvine the terms
f the contract. I would say that
-h University would have to
vanate that should the reonest
rise -- b-t I doubt it will. Any-
vay, we're not enthusiastic
hn"t the idea."
FORSYTH. not unlike his fel- t
ow administrators, says the
nlv hone for an agreement lies
n a revival of negotiations with
Fn snnnlving "some realistic
ronosals."
Bt union eyanitives, who
ased their modified demands
n their membership's wishes,
nd their positions on econom-
cs (particularly the seething
uition reduction issue), affirm-
tive action, GSA rights and
lass size, among others, realis-
c enough for their own tastes.
The problem which seems to
ave undercut negotiations all
long is that the two sides can-
tot agree on the definition of
GSA."
"The ,administration sees
SA's positions not as teaching
obs but as sources of support
or graduate students," said
Joran.
A n d Forsyth repeatedly
fints to issues he contends do
ot belong in a labor contract.
Take class size," he said, "It's
ornething that we won't include
a labor contract, I say it's an
dicational issue."

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a1
no
ii
fo
O M
ji
nn
ROMAN POLANSKI'S 1965
REPULSION
Catherine Deneuve plays a fantasy befouled virgin torn between her
craving for and loathing of men in what is probably her most masterful
acting on film. This is Polanski's first film in English and of his two or
three undeniably great works. It's the scariest if not goriest movie since
Hitchcock's Psycho.
SAT: De Sica's BICYCLE THIEF
NEMA GUILD TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD
7:00 & 9:05 Admission $1 .25
MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI'S 1960
L'AVVENTURA
The film that catapulted Antonioni into international critical recogni-
t ion is set in the aristoc~ratn ,tr c It iv nnt r-,licnl +kp t rrt4-rlc

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