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September 30, 1976 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-30

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r' e' Ei-gR-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY'

Deacons seek moral vi

Thursday, September 30, 1 r'
etory PRETZEL LOGIC
In basketball, a sport the ACC is noted for, 4
the school relishes its reputation as a giantkiller. By iRICiN A N

By MIKE HALPIN
"We've had our heads kicked in so many
times that we're not afraid of anything," says
Mark Miller, Vice President of the Wake Forest
University (WFU) student body.
"Our athletic program needs money since we
don't sell out at home, so it seems like we have
one of these games every year," he continued,
referring to this week's contest which sends
Wake Forest against against first-ranked Michi-
gan. Perhaps he was haunted by memories of
the 1975 season when WFU took on Oklahoma,
Penn State and Maryland on consecutive week-
ends, losing 63-0, 55-0 and 47-0 respectively.
WHY THIS MADNESS? What makes a school
of fewer than 3,000 students, with fewer alumni
than Michigan has students, agree to schedule
a game against a school 15 times its size?
Is it sheer greed for the visitor's share of those
100,000 paid admissions that drives a team to
risk gross humiliation on the gridiron? This
Wake Forest deserves a closer look.
First, Wake Forest is a solid academic school.
When Saturday's game was scheduled back in
the mid-sixties, it was largely on the strength
of its academic program.
Sounds strange? Perhaps, but former Athletic
Director Fritz Crisler often used to select non-

conference opponents whom he thought matched
Michigan in their emphasis on academics.
Wake Forest filled the bill, and they were in
the midst of a promising "rebuilding" period
with the expressed intention of becoming a
national football power.
Also, they had the date free and they were
willing to play in Michigan. So, the match was
made, the die was cast, the bridges were burned,
or whatever cliche you prefer to use. But the
question still remains-What motivates a Wake
Forest?
WAKE FOREST is a 142-year-old institution in
Winston-Salem, North Carolina. While it is non-
denominational, its ties to the Baptist Church
are indicated by the team name-"Demon
Deacons."
Its reliance on funding from the R.J. Reynolds
tobacco interests, which funded the school's
110-mile move from Wake Forest in 1956, is
shown in the school colors-Old Gold and Black.
The Deacs compete in the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference and they usually meet with only mod-
erate success.
In football, 89 years of Wake Forest teams
have compiled a 249-367-31 record, "the second
worst record of any bigtime school" according to
Sports Illustrated. Michigan, incidentally, has

built up a 576-196-33 record in 97 years of college
football.
IF THE OVERALL record has not been good
for Wake Forest, recent times have been worse.
In the past four seasons, the Deacons have
gone 7 and 36, with one tie. Things have been
tough in Winston-Salem.
A quick glance at the press guide indicates
that things are not going well in other sports
either. Baseball has experienced "some lean
years" but Deacon fans can take pride in
producing Bill Scripture. You remember him as
the minor league manager who bites the covers
off baseballs.
Tennis and swimming have "chalked up
winning seasons," but the freshman swimming
recruits "have already recorded times fast
enough to break existing Wake records." Track
"is not as glamorous as other sports," but the
program is "sound."
BUT WAKE FOREST is by no means an
athletic wasteland. The football program has
produced such sames as Brian Piccolo and
Norm Snead. Other notable alums, besides
Gerald Ford's son Michael, are golfers Arnold
Palmer and Lanny Wadkins.

Last year the Deacons upset number-two ranked
Maryland, and in 1975 they surprised number-I
one North Carolina State, ending the Wolffpack's
36 game winning streak.
THIS WEEK MANY at Wake Forest are
hoping that the football team will follow suit and'
play David to Michigan's Goliath. As student;
body president Bobby Kutteh put it: "After
y'all beat Navy so bad we were discouraged,j
but Ah'd say we're not completely pessimistic."
While the President is hoping for an upset,
his colleague Miller is perhaps more realistic.
He has faith in the football program and be-
lieves that one day it will bring national rank-
ings to Wake, but his hope for Saturday is that
the Deacons will "keep it close." Predicting a
Michigan victory by a final score of 45-14, he
says that "moral victories count too."
And who could disagree? If the Demon Dea-
cons of Wake Forest present themselves at
Michigan Stadium Saturday, execute well, play
their hearts out, and are simply overpowered
by superior size and strength, they will have
won a moral victory.f

SYSTEMS PROGRAMMERS
Rapid growth in an expanding market place
has created the need for several highly qualified
people to work in the areas of: 1 0 0
" DATA BASE MANAGEMENT
" COMPUTER DESIGN By The Associated Press
" MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS LOS ANGELES - The Los
" OPERATING SYSTEMS Angeles.Dodgers named yester-
day their holler-guy third base
If you have a minimum of three years pro- coach, Tom Lasorda, to suc-
gramming experience and are interested in a ceed the quiet Walter Alston,
challenging opportunity, send your resume in who is retiring as manager-of
complete confidence to: the baseball team after 23 sea-
Box 14 sons.
The Michigan Daily Lasorda, 49, had been the
420 Maynard odds-on choice to become man-
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 ager of the National League
(We are an equal opportunity employer) t o te anPeent by
D o d g e r President Peter

SPORTS OF THE DAILY

rers

name

Lasorda

O'Malley came as no surprise. had 472 minutes in penalties
in the 1974-75 season, topping
Alston, 64, announced Mon- his own record of 348.
day that he was retiring as the
field skipper at the end of this Schultz' best scoring year
season and will take another was 1973-74 when he had 20
job with the Dodger organiza-' goals and 16 assists for 3
tion. points. Last season. he had 1

r
'6
3

blow commentary on the Tues-
day night fight at Yankee Sta-
dium, while former heavy-
weight contender Jerry Quarry
'did the color commentary.
* * *
Goodbye Terry
ANN ARBOR-For-
ward Terry Thomas was placed
on waivers yesterday by the
Detroit Pistons of the National
Basketball Association.

r++.aaa.U. u va. vvuU Vll 11V 11CI%4 1J
Lroals and 19 aSSi tc

IMPORTANT GRADUATION
INFORMATION
Seniors and Grad Students graduating this December, April or next
December MUST MAKE appointments now to have yearbook gradua-
tion portraits done. These pictures are absolutely FREE this year. Make
your appointment on th D I A G between 10-4 daily, or call the
MICHIGANENSIAN YEARBOOK office at 764-0561, between 6-8
p.m., Monday thru Thursday.
FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED
LIMITED SPACE AVAILABLE

Lasorda has been Alston 's SvalO e " ---7
third base coach since 1973 More widely known for his
and managed for seven years rough play than for his scoring,
in the Dodgers' minor league Schultz led the Flyers' bruising
chain, with five pennants to attack that earned them the
his credit. nickname "The Broad Street
Bullies."
"I have been loyal to this or-
ganization that I love so dear- Philadelphia, with its in-
ly," Lasorda told a news con- timidating style of play, won
ference. "Loyalty is a two-way the Stanley Cup in 1974 and
street and at 9 o'clock this 1975. The Flyers were beaten
morning they showed me how by Montreal in the Cup finals
much they love me." last spring.I
* * *
The Flyers said Rick Mac-'
Bad boy tradced Leish, who was injured midway
P H IO L Aded Lthrough the 1975-76 season, will,
P dIL D LHIA replace Schultz at left wing.
Forward Dave Schultz, the
mostpenalized playerin the * * *
history of the National Hockey ,
League, has been traded to the Ali on TV
Los Angeles Kings, the Phila-
delphia Flyers said yesterday. New York - Barry Frank,
Schultz, who totaled 1,386 vice president of CBS, announc-
penalty minutes in his four ed Tuesday that the controver-
years with the Flyers, was sial Muhammad Ali - Ken Nor-
traded for future considera- ton heavyweight title fight will
tions, a team spokesman said. be shown Friday, Oct. 22 from
The feisty left winger, 8 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., EDT.
nicknamed "The Hammer," As a previewRatwo-minute

;

The 6-6, 220-pound Thomas
played in 28 games last season,
averaging 2.8 points. He play-
ed college basketball at the
University of Detroit.
The Pistons must trim their
roster to the 12-player NBA
limit by Oct. 22, when the
team opens its regular season
at Kansas City.
Forwards Curtis Rowe and
Marvin Barnes are holding out
in hopes of new contracts and
still had not shown up at the
camp Wednesday but were in-
cluded in 20-player count, offi-
cials said.
* * *
Valuable Chrissie
NEW YORK-Chris

Tigers' Houk rich.
* REin dreams aind dollars
VOU ARE ENTERING A WORLD WHERE FANTASY IS
FACT, WHERE THE BTZAV1E TS 1TC' AT ""TRE
SATIRE IS THE ORDER OF THE DAY. YOU ARE IN ...
THE BONIN-OZONE...
Dr. Dominic Dinare leaned closer to his nurse's avacado-
scented lips. He loved avacadoes.
"Doctor, he was laying in bed when a souvenir bat fell
off his wall and struck him in the head. He appears to be
delirious ... he just keeps mumbling things about baseball."
"I'd better take a look at him," Dinare said, turning his
gaze to the aging patient as his callipygian nurse coyly exited.
"Now, then, my name is Dr. Dinare, and I'd like to talk
to you for a few minutes. Let's start with your name, please."
The patient spat a wad of brownish juice into his bedpan.
"Ralph Houk."
"Ralph Houk, eh? Occupation?"
"Manager of the World Champion Detroit Tigers."
Dinare's eyebrows nearly collided. "The ... uh ... World
Champion Detroit Tigers?"
"Why, yes. You didn't hear? ... well, perhaps I'd better
refresh your memory. It's a story well worth telling.
"Little did I know back in Lakeland that I was piloting
the potential powerhouse of the American League. I thought
we could hit, but the pitching worried me.
Bird brain bombed
"At first, I wasn't sure who we'd throw in the rotation
behind Coleman and Roberts, especially since that bird-brained
rookie ... that curly-headed kid, what was his name? ... got
bombed back to Evansville right away.
"But first it was Lagrow,gand then Bare and Slayback,
stepping in there with shutouts and complete games, and Bruce
Taylor really shored up the bullpen.
"Not that it was that much of a runaway early in the
year. We just weren't getting those big hits from guys like
Horton, Staub, and LeFlore. It got really embarrassing when
we checked the records and found out LeFlore was only 16
years old, not 24 like he told us. We had to let him go be-
cause his contract was invalid, but Steve Kemp stepped in
and picked up the slack.
"The other guys chipped in, too. Rodriquez started hitting
like he did back with the Senators - those ten homers by
Memorial Day really helped. And Freehan and Meyer com-
bined to give us our best first base play since ... well, Lou
Gehrig."
"Uh, excuse me, Mr. Houk, but wasn't Lou Gehrig a
Yankee?"
"Oh ... that's right. Hmmm, why would I remember him?
Oh well, on with the story.
Garcia: good gamble
"Anyway, the Bosox and the Brewers were breathing
down the back of our neck and I know I had to do some-
thing. I tried using two designated hitters in a game for a
while, but pretty soon the umps caught on to that.
"That's when I made the trade ... perhaps the most
brilliant of my career ... and coaxed Pedro Garcia away
from the Brewers.
"Now, Veryzer had really come on - fielding steadily,
hitting around .270 with some power, and really giving us
leadership, turning into a real holler guy. But he never really
blossomed until we got Garcia in here. Those guys started
turning double plays like Farrah Fawcett-Majors turns heads.
"But even that wasn't enough. Roberts had slumped hor-
ribly, we sold him to the Cubs an we were in dire need
of a lefthanded starter. So, you know what we did?"
"Uh, brought someone up from the minors?" Dinare ven-
tured.
"No, stupid," Houk said, kicking pill-dust on Dinare's
shoes, "we took the money we saved from buying too few
windbreakers for Jacket Day and bought Vida Blue from
the A's. He loved it in Detroit, and we loved him ... es-
pecially when he won that game that put us ahead to stay.
"The clinching was a mere formality, although it was
exciting winning on that twelfth-inning homer by Milt May.
That was the Yankees' 100th loss, and I did feel kind of bad
about that ... hmmm, I can't remember why ... but anyway,
Coleman deserved his 25th after a dozen perfect innings. Man,
did that guy pitch this year.
"After the way we ran over the rest of the AL, the series
was almost anticlimactic. Not that the Reds weren't a good
team, but they just weren't in our league. They wouldn't even
have won that one game if Scrivener hadn't passed two base-
runners on his pitch-hit grand slam. He never could control
his speed.
"So we came back to the Motor City for the grandest re-
ception anyone has ever had ... I've never seen a city so united.
I had to share the credit with Joe Schultz, a brilliant coach,
but it was the happiest day of my life."
Dr. Dinare signed. "Uh, Mr. Houk, I realize that as Tiger
manager, you, of anyone, should know, but ... are you sure
all of this really happened?"
Houk smiled, reached inside his orange-and-black striped
pajamas and pulled out THE contract, large and bloated with
benefits, guarantees and severance pay clauses.
"Of course," he beamed. "Why else would they have given

me this?"

w

mmmm qa

I

highlight of the
shown on CBS
tacular this Satu
ing parts of the
round, starting
For the Oct. 22
Brookshire did

fight will be Evert of the Phoenix Racquets
Sports Spec- has been named World Team
irday, includ- Tennis Most Valuable Female
decisiv 4:3 t Player and Female Rookie of
at 4:30 p.m. the Year, it was announced by
telecast, Tom WTT Commissioner Butch
the blow-by- Buchholz Wednesday.

Michigan Union, in cooperation with M.S.A., U.A.C.,
Campus Coalition, WRCN Radio, and the office of
Student Organizational Services, presents the
TIT IES
LIVE BROADCAST FROM THE FAIR BY
WRCN CAMPUS RADIOPT1f
U ' C." Z A10 Pm

SUN BAKERY
A NOW OPEN
* Whole Grain Breads
* Danish Pastry
" Real Cream Eclairs
* Fresh Colombian Coffee
" Special Order Cakes
Come See our new home
301 E. LIBERTY 668-6320

1

-TONIGHT-
IN SOLIDARITY WITH CHILE
an evening of folklore and protest music from Chile and
Latin America and poems by Pablo Neruda
with
BERNARDO PALOMBO
Internationally known Argentine composer and performer
Bernardo explains his music in English, which will be
available in bilingual song sheets.
Chilean pastries and refreshments will be served
At THE ARK
1421 HILL ST.
Thursday, Sept. 30-8:30 p.m.
DONATION $2.00

- GRIJIE PICKS

i

FLASH! All you starving Jimmy the Greek's. Break the
fast with a Pizza Bob's pizza by winning this week's
Griddie Picks. Larry Laffrey of 908 Sybil overcame a rec-
ord field of entries and the most upsets of the year to
claim honors last week. For your chance get your picks
to The Daily (420 Maynard) by midnight Friday or go
famished until next Saturday.

1) Wake Forest at MICHIGAN

10) Minnesota at Washington

Sponsored by the Group on Latin American Issues
University of Michigan
There IS a difference!!!
-*MCAT - LSAT - DAT
.GMAT *.CPAT .VAT .GRE *OCAT .SAT

2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)

(pick score)
UCLA at Ohio State
Arizona at Northwestern
Texas A&M at Illinois
N.C. State at Indiana
Iowa at USC
Wisconsin at Kansas
Notre Dame at Michigan
State
Miami, Ohio at Purdue

11)
12)
13)
14)
15)
16)
17)
18)
19)
20)

Alabama at Georgia
Auburn at Mississippi
North Carolina at Missouri
Florida at LSU
SMU at Memphis State
Oregon St. at Syracuse
Temple at Delaware
New Mexico at Colorado St.
Air Force at Kent State
DAILY LIBELS vs. Navy
VR's

9)

. NATIONAL MED. & DENT. BOARDS
.ECFMG "FLEX
Flexible Programs and Hours
Over 38 years of experience and success. Small classes. Voluminous
hnm, eti, mtoriie Cnireoe that ar ronstantlyiundated .CenterC

I ~

- I I I 1r

r

r\ A \/

c.r nom- -a

; + . " ; ;

A NEW DAWNING

I ! 1 EII 11/ %.-f 1 l gf\

I

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