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September 29, 1976 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-29

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Wednesday, September 29, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

WINS UNANIMOUS DECISION

Ahli
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Muhammad
Ali, calling on every trick he
has learned in his long and con-
troversial career, pounded out
a unanimous 15-round decision
over Ken Norton last night and
retained his world heavyweight
championship.
The 34-year-old Ali, some
times floating like the butter-
fly he has bragged about,
other times stinging like a
bee with solid jabs and short
right leads, seemed to con-
trol the tempo from the outset
although Norton kept moving
forward and landed the hard-
er punches.
Ali even resorted to the rope-
a-dope defense he used when he
wrested the title away from
George Foreman.
There was only one thing he
did not do. He did not destroy
Norton as he predicted he
wonld do.
Referee Arthur Mercante
scored the fight 8-6-1 for Ali
while judges Harold Lederman
and Barney Smith each had it
8-7 for Ali.
The Associated Press had it
9-6 for the chamnion.
Norton now has gone 39
tovgh rounds with the man
who proclaims himself the3

cutpunch s

Norton

greatest fighter of all time.
The only thing he has to show
for it is one victory, some
real good money and a night
of frustration.
The defeat probably wrote an
end to Norton's boxing career.
At 31, movies seem to be more
in his future than fights.
Ali, who predicted the fight
would not go more than five
rounds, came out flat-footed,
gunning for power. His best
weapons in the first six rounds
were short right hands, many
of them leads.
But Norton gave as good as
he got and after eight rounds it
seemed to be anybody's fight.
Then, in the ninth, Ali came
out dancing and jabbing and
the jab was effective. The
champion also shook Norton
with a left-right-left to the
head in the round which end-
ed with Norton scoring a
solid right to the head.
In the 10th, Ali was dancing
and jabbing again and Norton
couldn't do anything about it.
Ali made it three rounds in a
row, at least on The AP card,
when he took the 11th round, in
which Norton imitated Ali's
rona-a-dope, a tactic the champ
had used earlier in the fight.
!Then in the 11th, Ali scored
with two telling rights, both of
them leads, and two good lefts
to the head.

NIGHT EDITOR:
JOHN NIEMEYER

t
'
If
i

the fight. "I can't lose it now."
The win, Ali's 19th in 20
championship fights, earned
him at least $6 million and
set up a possible $10-million
match with George Foreman
sometime next year.
Ali was to get 50 per cent of
all revenue over $9 million, but
it was not known what the final
financial figure would be. Nor-
ton was guaranteed $1 million
and five per cent of all reve-
nue.
An announced crowd of 42,-
000 - many paying $200 -
showed up for the first fight in
Yankee Stadium since Ingemar
Johansson knocked out Floyd:
Patterson June 26, 1959. And it
was the first outdoor heavy-

weight championship bout in
the United States since Sonny
Liston's kayo .of Patterson at
Chicago's Comiskey Park Sept.
25, 1962.
The live gate apparently will
top $3 million and break the all
time record of $2,658,660 paid
by 104,943 people for the second
Jack Dempsey - Gene Tunney
fight in 1927 at Chicago's Sol-
dier Field.
Revenue also will come in
from closed-circuit television
to locations holding 1.5 mil-
lion seats in the United States
and Canada and from tele-
casts to 57 other countries.
CBS also paid $1 million to
show the fight on United States
home television at a later date.

several hard punches to thea
head and body."
When the final bell rang, Nor-
ton had a look of jubilation onp
his face.s
But when he left the ring a
few minutes later, there were
tears in his eyes.
"I know I won it, you know Iv
won it," Norton said in the
dressing room. "I think even
Ali knows I won it:"
The victory enabled Ali to
end this rough-tough series the
same way he closed out his his-
toric series of three bouts with
Joe Frazier - an opening loss
and then two victories.
And Ali's final victories over
Frazier and Norton came as
as champion. "I'm at the end
of my career," he said before
The Top 20
By The United Press International

:. :V I
' _ a~

AP Photo
KEN NORTON, shown left, clinches with defending champion Muhammed Ali, in last night's
title bout held in New Yorks Yankee Stadium. The fight went the total fifteen rounds, leav-
ing Ali on top of a unanimous decision to retain his heavyweight crown.
SCORES SOAR:

Piston

Blues

be at

By SCOTT LEWIS ' is anything to be ashamed of."
For the first time in years, the
A greatly depleted Detroit Pistons will have to cut top-
Piston team gave a passing and notch players to reach the play-
shooting exhibition in front of er limit of twelve by the begin-
2,000 fans at Crisler Arena last ning of the season on October
night, with the Red team top- 22.
ping the Blues, 151-137, in their
annual intrasquad game. A A ti-a
ALS ,.UT OF th meJ 5~Ik

.'

Henry Dickerson, a guard ac-
quired by the Pistons late last
season, hit numerous line drive
jumpers from all over the
court and finished with 37
points, to pace a 62 per cent
shooting performance by the
Reds.
THE GAME SAW the return
of Kevin Porter to the Detroit
area, after he missed much
of last season with a severe
knee injury. Porter didn't ap-
pear hampered by this, how-
ever, as he continuously wowed
the crowd with his numerous
assortment of quick passes and
driving layups.
The speedy guard scored 27
points and, more importantly,
dished out 11 assists. For the
Pistons to jell, Porter must con-
tinuously show this form, as the
Pistons rely on his passing
more than his shooting.
If the fans came out just to
see Porter, they would have
left happily, but most of the
crowd was disappointed by the
notable absence of the much-
heralded "new" Pistons.
ALL - STAR FORWARD Cur-
tis Rowe has yet to reach an
agreement with General Man-
ager Oscar Feldman on his
status with the team, and Mar-
vin Barnes, the Pistons' selec-
tion in the ABA dispersal draft,
has yet to sien a contract. Both
have been absent from camp.
"There's nothing I can do,
about the situation," said Pis-
ton coach. Herb Brown, who'
must hold camp without the two
stars but keep in the back of
his mind that they will event-
ually play. "We'll just have to
work with what we've got for
the moment."
"Not that "what we've got"

AL,3V vu t Vr oe ga11
Fiderych wins
Mark "The Bird" Fidrych
pitched his fourth shutout of
the season last night, beating
the Cleveland Indians 4-0, in
the first game of a double
hende.- Willie Horton led the
off--,-,-- charge for the Tig-
ers q home run and two
R" " "e win boosts Fid-
rych's record to 18-9, and
ups his chances for Rookie
of the Year honors.
because of injuries were newly
acquired draft choices Leon
Douglas and Phil Sellers.
Douglas, the Pistons' first
draft choice pulled his right
hamstring in practice today and

had to sit out of the game as
a precautionary measure. Sell-
ers, on the other hand, has an
inflamed achilles tendon and
is currently on crutches.
Sellers gained fame in Ann
Arbor because of his "non-per-
formance" against Michigan in
the NCAA playoffs when he
played for Rutgers.
The Pistons have converted
him to a guard instead of a
forward, and he has responded
very well thus far. In the sum-
mer league, he shot a remark-
able 63 percent for the Pistons,
and "he hastaevery good chance
of making the team," accord-
ing to Brown.
OTHER NOTABLE perform-
ances in the scrimmage were
turned in by the reliable veter-
ans of the team, who suddenly
find themselves in a battle for

But Norton kept coming andj
punching with all his power, al-
s land the punch that could turn
the tide for him in the final
team in scoring with 31 points four rounds. And Ali remained
and he led both squads in re- effective with his left hand'
bounding with 14. Chris Ford right to the final bell, although
played his usual strong defen- he missed more in the final 12
sive game, coming up with five minutes that he had for most
steals to go with his 21 points. of the fight.
Bob Lanier came up with The 15th round ended withj
twenty points and twelve re- Norton, weighing 217, bulling ;
bounds, as he dominated the: the 221-pound Ali into a neu-
middle for the Reds. George tral corner and scoring with

1. MICHIGAN (39) 3-0........
2. UCLA 3-0.........
3. Pittsburgh (3) 3-0..........
4. Oklahoma 3-0 ...............
5. Nebraska 2-0-1.............
6. Georgia 3-0
7. Maryland 3-0..............
8. Ohio State 2-1...............
9. Alabama 2-1..............
10. Missouri 2-1 .........
11. Kansas 3-0 ...............
12. Southern Cal. 2-1..........
13. LSU 2-0-1.
14. North Carolina 4-0.....
15. Notre Dame 2-2............
16. Boston College 2-0.........
17. Florida 2-1 .. .......
18. Houston 2-1...............
19. Tulsa 3-1..................
20. Texas 1-1 ..................

417
309
292
291
248
195
110
103
75
45
41:
35
34
141
10
9
6
5
4:

Trapp put in 23
Eberhard added

t~u. %T 16
points and Al
16.

SOME OTHER new players
gave their all in coming up
with promising performances.
Randy Henry and Cornelius
Cash both played very well for
the Reds, and Charles Edge and
Walter Luckett performed ad-
mirably for the Blue team.
Overall, Brown was pleased
with the t-min's play. "All we
wanted to do was see what cer-
tain people could do," he said.
"We want to find out which!

Last Lecture
The first in a series of lectures
prepared as if they were the last
lecture professors would ever give.
Wednesday, Sept. 29, 1976
JOHN BAILEY
Near Eastern Studies
4 TO 5 P.M.
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL
Sponsored by the OFFICE OF ETHICS AND
RELIGION and CANTERBURY HOUSE
NEXT WEEK: Professor Marvin Felheim
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6th

THETA XI-The Coed House
1345 Washtenaw at South University
(the house with the big white pillars)
We welcome yOU to take SEPT. 26-30
a look at our house. 7-10 p.m.
We need a few good OR CALL
Wenee f gHOUSE: 761-6133
peoe.nJIM: 995-8455
people.SUE: 662-6091
Last Two Doys
Complete Shows Today
at 1-3-5-7 Ope.n 12:45
All seats $1.25 till 5:00
THE STREETS ARE
ALIVE AGAIN !
"BRILLIANT" "POWERFUL"
CAROL KANE in P ROBERT DE NIRO in
L
PG wane Communie.gton.Company 0 .
Ends Thursday
Shows Today at
1:00 3:05-5:10-7:15-9:20
TP 6 9All seats $1.25 till 5:00
The year's most shattering experience

the squad with many of the new guys we're
players. which guys
Howard Porter led the Blue ed in.'

interested in and
we're not interest-'

SHUT OUT EMU 3-0

Rjramount Pictures Presents
A Roman Polanski Film

Clubbers triumph easily

By GARY SWAN
YPSILANTI - The inventor
of the game of field hockey
probably never envisioned it as
a great social ice-breaker.
Put 22 people out on a field,
arm them with wooden sticks
and set them to fighting over a
small, heavy hard ball. It's
hardly the makings of an after-
noon tea party.
But Dawn Kohut wouldn't
feel at ease making newv
friends over tea, anyway. She
arrived at the Michigan cam-
pus this fall, suitcase in one
arm and hockey stick in the
other. Yesterday, she worked
the latter to perfection, scor-
ing two goals in Michigan's 3-0
season opening victory over
Eastern Michigan.
Kohut is the nucleus of a

young Michigan team which al-
ready has third-year coach Phyl-
lis Ocker eyeing post-season
g I o r y. Yesterday's Michigan
squad included four freshwomen,
Mary Hibbard, ' Laura Pieri,
Mary Callam and Jean Mc-
Carthy, in addition to transfer
Kohut.
Much of Michigan's gain is at
the expense of tiny Adrian Col-
lege, where Kohut spent her
first two varsity seasons.
"Ican remember playing
Michigan th@ last couple
years," she recalled. "We
beat them once and lost once.
I couldn't get very excited
about beating Michigan be-
cause I wasn't very excited
about being at Adrian."
So Kohut packed her bags and
headed north to Ann Arbor,
much to the delight of her new
Michigan friends.
"I1 found Adrian just too small,
abo'it 1,000 students. Everybody
knew what everybody else did'
all the time. It was real easy to,
go partying every night. I
couldn't go on like that," she
said. "My liver told me to
leave."
She said her parents sent her
to Adrian to calm down a bit.
"You might say I was a little:
wild in high school," she said.
But Kohut continued to run wild
on the Adrian athletic fields,E
scoring 27 goals last year.
She took little nersonal glory
in her two goals yesterday,
crediting teammates for
screening the Eastern Michi-
gun goalie on the first and
calling the second goal "a
garbage goal - my little

brother could have kicked that
in,.
But her teammates gave her,
more credit than she would
claim herself. The first, they
said, was a "real beauty" about
16 yards out of a corner.
Stephanie Buttrey, from Ann
Arbor, scored between Kohut's
goals, increasing the 1-0 Michi-
gan halftime lead. Coach Ocker
praised freshwomen Hibbard
and Roberta Zald for their de-;
fensive work in the shutout.
"You've really got to credit
the defense, too," Kohut said.
"I was surprised to see how!
many talented people tried out
for this team. As good as it is
now, it's young and going to get
better."

Sweet

I'm an Air Force of-
ficer and this is my
sweet chariot. When I
visit home people are
happy to see me. And
proud. They say I'm
doing my part in the
community by show-
ing the young people
and the adults that
you really can make
it. Yousreally can get
your share of the
good life.
I also feel good
about my position in
the Air Force commu-
nity. I'm a leader
there, too, I'm some-
one the other broth-
ers and sisters I meet
in the service can
look to. Ard it reas-
sures them to know
they have a voice in1
Air Force matters that
concern them.
The Air Force needs
more leaders... .pilots
aircrew members
...math majors ...sci-
ence and engineering
majors. You might be
one of them and the
best way to find that
out is in an Air Force
ROTC program. There
are two, three, and
four-year programs.
Scholarship and non-
scholarship. Why not
look into all of thenm
and see if one fits
your plans? It's worth
it, brother.

A Paramount Picture
In Color

I' ~

Ends Tomorrow
Shows Today at
1-3-5-7-9 Open 12:45
All seats $1.25 till 5:00
THEY WERE NOT
FORGOTTEN BY HISTORY-
THEY WERE LEFT OUT ON PURPOSE!
"NOT SINCE 'CAT BALLOU'
such a hilariously bawdy movie!"
Siv

Women spikers split
in tn-meet opener

Styling
is the ONLY
way to go!
U-M stylists
at the
Union
Open- 8:30 a.m.

KALAMAZOO - Michigan's
women's volleyball team open-
ed their season by losing two
games to Central Michigan and
winning two of three against.
Western Michigan in a tri-meet
last night.
THE SPIKERS started off
with two identical 15-8 losses
to a powerful Central team.
Michigan Coach Sandy Vong
was quite pleased with his
team's perfarmance against the
veteran squad, however.
"We played very well con-
sidering it was our first game,"
said coach Vong.
The young team turned around
against Western in the next
contest taking the first game
15-13, losing the second 15-3
and then coming from behind

in the rubber match to win
16-11.
"WE COMPLETELY let down
in the second game against
Western," lamented Vong.
They went out in the third
game and dropped behind 8-2,
but with a great team effort
managed to take the win.
Vong was really pleased with
the come from behind win say-
iug," oir young team showed
a lot of poise in coming from
a deficit of 8-2."

Contact: AFROTC,North Hall, Ph. 764-2403
Put it all together in Air Force ROTC,

A broken down
frontier scout
teams up with
a drunken Indian
with a social
disease to pull
off the Great
Brothel Robbery
of 1908!

I

0

I

I

ARGO PARK CANOE
,OKS 4
ENJOY THE
FALL COLORS
BY CANOE

LIVERY
K4

I

I,

!, ._ . __

GRIIIJI PICKS l

SAMUEL Z.ARKOFF PresentsA JULES BUCK PRODUCTION
An AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL PICTURE
Lee _,Oliver Robert Elizabeth Strother Sylvia

11

Ill

III

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