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September 28, 1976 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-28

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 28, 1976

Paq e Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

African blacks demand rule Daycare gets Fleming calls for
Wheeler veto .

U

(Continued from Page 1)
A British mission led by Min-
ister of State Edward Row-
lands, the Foreign Office expert
on Africa, flew to Botswana

A spokesman said the Africans
informed Washington they had
not rejected the British-Ameri- I
can plan. He said the "matter
is on track."
"The process is going to re-

ers would have
legalized white
desia if they
Smith's terms
black majority

entrenched and'
power in Rho-:
had accepted
for eventual!
rule.

(Continued from Page 1)
urge its passage; at a public
hearing held on the ordinance,
no one had spoken in its de-

under grad revision

yestra tocoferwth the Af "
riceers.Tohcoeril -e -quire major adjustments by
rican leaders. The early depar- both sides," William Rogers,
ture of the team, originally bt ie, ila oes
scheduled to leave today, was undersecretary of state, told
viewed as an indication of the newsmen. He stressed that theI
urgency of its task. Africans had agreed to attend
After talks in Botswana with a conference without precondi-
Presidents Kenneth Kaunda ofLns.
Zambia, Samora Machel of Mo- Nyerere said that African lead-
zambique, Agostinho Neto of
Angola and Sir Seretse Khama!
of Botswana, Rowlands will go tichigais tu
to Tanzania for talks with Pres-
ident Julius Nyerere.
The Rhodesian government'OA4 Title IX
said that the plan it had pro-
posed had been handed over by (continued from Page 1)
Secretary of State Henry Kis- ing Yost in exchange for cer-
singer after his 11-day African I tamn renovations done on the
shuttle, and that the Africans room.
were now backing out of the "MICHIGAMUA claims that
agreement. the room has no value to the
Under the proposals outlined Union because it is a fire haz-
by Kissinger the interim gov- ard. But the point is that it
ernment would be formed to much have value to them," An-
oversee the transition of politi- ita Tanay said.
cal power from Rhodesia's "Why should this organiza-
whites to blacks over two tion operate any differently than
years. other social organizations?"
Fowler asked. "All University
day, whites would head the in- follorles and rateonstbut
term government, control the ; forulesandregulaitsu
ministries of defense and law not Michigamua. For 75 years
and order, and exercise an ef-j this group has operated in a
fective veto power.cs holy position. This in itself shows
that it is not a social group.I
But the State Department in The University has treated its'
Washington said the plan as members with respect over the
outlined by Smith had never years."
been approved by the Africans. "If you don't bug the Univer-
4 proposals COmpc

Interviewed in Dar-es-Salaam fense.
by the British Broadcasting T
Corporation, Nyerere spelled out THIRD, claimed Wheeler,
wh he ead fthene probable effect of the
why the leaders of the five adopted ordinance would be to
black African states rejected shift larger percentages of new,
certain aspects of Smith's state- day care centers to commercial,
the health and safety dangers
for the enrolled children ..."
Ca accusedCouncil member Roger Ber-i
toia (R-Third Ward), who1
sponsored the ordinance, calledf
Wheeler's veto "shortsighted,"<
Vj()iC tionf and blamed it on "ans unfortu-

(Continued from Page 1)
for an increase in the number
of professors teaching under-
graduate courses in order to
maintain the University's repu-
tation in higher education, not-
ing that between 40 and 44 per
cent of undergraduate student;
credit hours in LSA are cur-
rently taught by graduate as-
sistants.
HOWEVER, he said the prob-
lems connected with meeting
the financial obligation in theI
employment of additional pro-
fessors in undergraduate work;
and replacing the support

cial pool and press the state
legislature for "catch-up" help.
Later, Fleming told The Daily
that his references to LSA in
his speech were necessary to
emphasize his point.
"YOU'RE NOT going to make
any impact on undergraduate
education if you don't make it
on LSA," he said, noting the
school's large enrollment.
LSA Dean Billy Frye last
night termed the University
EPresident's remarks justified
and "helpful."
Earlier, Fleming called infla-

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nate difference nznngp-which graduate assistants de- tion the most serious of the C"___
sity about discrimination, they losophies." rive from their teaching are University's external difficul-
I have no qualms about discrim- i Bertoia said the Republicans not insolvable. ' ties, emphasizing the rise in_ . V
mating," Blumenthal said. "So, "see no reason" to attempt an Drawing from a recently' utility costs and the cost of pay-
if we can force them to ex- override of the mayoral veto. brightening economic outlook, ing the employer's share of =
amine their practices, maybe "We'll have our chance again Fleming urged the University Social Security as the most de-
they won't discriminate, if only to claim its stake in the finan- bilitating monetary obligations. °3
thywntdsriiaeIfol at the next election when we
to be self-protective."--
to besl-roetv. get an opportunity to get rid of_ _ _ _
" The University has the au- him (Wheeler)", Bertoia said.
thority to say you can't have "I don't like doing vetoes,"
these offices anymore (because Wheeler protested. "But I just
of sex discrimination practices) feel this (the ordinance) was ;to g
and if the University aoesn't do the wrong thing to do."
this, they can lose federal
funds." "V/ 000
"They're trying to make usLSKILLS WORKSHOPiAP"PYH 0U R
seem like we're real hard-ass(Dr
people because we want to de- 5 c iscoun' on Drinks
peoy becr nt te- 1 Including a discussion of: issues research, advance work, between 9 & p.
stroy their tradition but the Uni-gIj
versity has a tradition of dis- )gcanvassing, getting out the vole, press, mailings, fund
crimination and the purpose of sraising, advertising, headquarters organization, writing w5 Discount on Admission
legislation like Title IX and Ti- with Student I.D..
leiltobieTteI n i an d ski tm r'literature, printing, speakers, state-wide organization.
tie VI is to break that tradi- COMING SEPT. 29
ion," said Blumenthal.Continued romae Learn Skills Useful For Work In Electoral SA LTY DOG
members of the Court of Ap- Politics-How To Join A Campaign This r 516 E. Liberty 994-5350
se heals might have been attending Fall
ballot ~Saturday's game and the Uni-SA,2- ~ 1____________
versity prefered t avoid any
Rep. Perry Bullard of Ann charges that it was "improperly EDN E 29 -8_pm.
Arbor, an opponent of the pro- trying to influence the decision.
posal, called it "a backward Finally, Daane said Hall's in- ROOM 126- EAST QUA D
absurdity." Bullard charged volvement in the "applause IF YOU THOUGHT YOU
that the proposal would "put an meter" might have seemed toM
emphasis on personal consump- supporters of Hall like "the sponsored by Resdentil College Field Studies THE BUS
tion rather than on programs Michigan Band was, arguably,
which are of benefit to our en- ridiculing their candidate." RELAX
tire society."- - - ------------ - __: __---- - - ----- --
"(Proposal C) would be a dis-
aster for the Ann Arbor area.NR
The University budget would be IM OR TA NT G R A D U AT I N
-under extreme pressure if the r

(Continued from Page 1) The 8.3 per cent spending
container and then throw it in ceiling provision of proposal
the trash barrel?" C has also caused some contro-
Both sides of the bottle bill versy. Proponents of the bill,
argument contend they have a including the State Chamber
good chance in November. "Or- of Commerce, contend that
iginally, it was like motherhood more money should be diverted
- everyone was for it," said t o w a r d s private business
Vagnozzi. "But then both sides through commerce, not paid to
got their arguments out, and I the state as taxes.
think it's a lot closer now." "The question is, can the
"IT'S OUT of the hands of state continue to spend beyond
the politicians - they had it the income of people in the
for 12 years and didn't do any- state?" commented Chris Hal-
thing about it," said Washing-, verson of the State Chamber of
ton. "It'll keep coming up in I Commerce.
the legislature, but if the pro- --
posal goes down to defeat in the l
fall it'll be a dead issue for I
some time." ' AST CALL

r
r
,i
t!
>!
?!

spending limitation were in
I posed," Bullard asserted.

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