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September 28, 1976 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Arts &Entertainment Tuesday, September 28, 1976

Page Five

Jazz kings

thrill Hill

Daily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS
JAZZ MUSICIAN Chick Corea grimaces as he attempts to get just the right sounds from his acoustic piano. Corea and vibes
player Gary Burton thrilled an audience at Hill Aud. into a standing ovation last Saturday night.

By JIM SHAHIN and parties, Corea painted por- Following a short intermis- calm. The piece was nourished
GATURDAY NIGHT I listened traits of an audience at an ex- sion, Corea and Burton joined by both, becoming one of the
to a weaving. Like spinning hibition. Starting strongly, the forces; and the result exceeded most intense moments of the
autumn into a warm blanket, idea disintegrated into a mere expectation. "Falling Grace," night.
pianist Chick Corea and vibeist good attempt and from there their first selection, sounded
Gary Burton opened the Eclipse became the evening's weakest loose and happy. Both artists served to keep
Jazz season with as much tex- point. It ended like a sidelong the other in check. Where Corea
ture as music. glance. AND TO THINK, three years. was erratic, Burton was steady;
Three years since these two where Burton was indulgent,
Working first as soloists, then He concluded his set with the have played together. But they Corea became temperate. To-
as a duet, the pair offered Hill exciting "Some Time Ago,' weren't straining or competing. gether, as apart, they were sad,
Auditorium about three hours of which he described as a land- Rather, they were playing sym- funny, tender, powerful, in all,
the finest music it has heard in scape painting in his house that biotically. Dangerously fragile vital.
quite some time. Both, alone he sees in a recurring dream. here, manic there the two
and together, delivered a de- Tight, strong and moody, the ANN ARBOR responded in
licious array of moods. piece wound around itself, high- worked to support their crea kind with a warm standing ova-
lighting and swapping themes tions while simultaneously ex- tion, garnishing the respectful
Following three years of non- like
letricwina ty, Cyeas fni- tike subplots. It was an evoca- panding on them. accolades rightly reserved for
electricinactivi , Co a nghtive rendering of a masterpiece. "xsuch performances.
openng et as atrimphnt"Desert Air" was an example
return to acoustic piano. His GARY BURTON then took the of the musicians' rapport. The For their part, Chick Corea
playing, despite an avowed at- stage. His relaxed, but involved duet explored compatible but and Gary Burton returned with
tack of nerves, was a demon-|approach brought a new intel- polarized ideas; Burton played a moving rendition of Corea's
stration in finesse, patience and ligence and exuberance to the wh f u sof y "The Children's Song," and an
precision. vibes. Opening with Keith Jar- a sand exuberant interpretation o f
rett's "Moon Child" and "In blizzard, while Corea worked un- "What Game Shall We Play
COREA'S command of his in- Your Quiet Place," Burton show- der him with a simple line, Today," leaving a standing ova-
strument took on subtle power ed versatility and invention, lending a feeling of imminent tion calling for more.
that showed an attention to de-e
veloment Varatios intem moving the audience to shower: ________
velopment.Variations em-him with the loudest applause
perament within a given piece totaCpit
exhibited his impecable touch
for nuance. The flamenco im- Two Steve Swallow numbers Looking For Things To Do
provisation, for instance, was: followed, "Great Mountains"
swirling, calm, quelled yet brew- and "Arise, Her Eyes." Burton MICHIGAN S T U D E N T ASSEMBLY
ing like dark clouds passing executed them with a style as
over an ocean. In all, the com- rich as whipping cream and asj (MSA) is interviewing for the following
position was a breeze of exhila- soft as sea foam. Sure, but not
ration, making more work in confining, they sounded fresh, mportant positions:
this mode anxiously awaited. an
alve with the magic of an artist TREASURER, ELECTIONS DIRECTOR
Playing a game that he per- whose technique does not dom- and DI RECTOR OF
forms at family get-togethers inate his ideas.,n IET RO
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
TUESDAY LUNCH-DISCUSSION $Ept,28 MSA is also interviewing for positions on various
"Korea--Caught in the Power Struggle" internal committees and University committees.
Speaker: ROY WHANG, Journalist CONTACT MSA NOW!
formerly for the MSA OFFICES 763-3241
FAR EASTERN ECONOMIC REVIEW 3909 M. UNION BLDG. 763-3242
in Hong Kong and Seoul
at the
ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER U '"""""""" "'"" """ """"'U"'"'"""''""""
921 CHURCH ST. PREMIERE NIGHTS
LUNCH-75c 12 NOON P
Lunch is prepared and served by AT BICYCLE IA ' S
CHURCH WOMEN UNITED OF ANN ARBOR
- FEATURING
9*RICH THICK SAUCE O0GARLIC TOAST
C FRESHLY COOKED SPAGHETTI
DON'TUM ISSRTHE .ALL for 99c
DON'T MISS THE # CO-STARRING
WUOM 91.7 FM Volunteer Meeting Pitchers of Strohs
aI
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Wednesday, Sept. 29 at 7:30 p.m. Only $2.00 .
I EVERY MONDAY & TUESDAY
*NIGHT*a
Fifth Floor of LSA Building NIGHT B ,Ci e
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL 764-9210 1301 S. UNIVERSITY,
665-2650
I _- AII C[ t -C4DmD m_

PINE KNOB CONCERT:
Starshir
By KURT HARJU Obviously
JPOR AWHILE there, it didn't was a disap
look like Jefferson Starship Starship, wh
was ever going to get a chance sold out the
to play Pine Knob this year. went on to pi
First, their original dates at the ing show of m
beginning of the month had to As the major
be cancelled due to an injury filed in late,
to one of the group members; nitely '-;ked
and when they finally did arrive time t let
for two make up concerts Sun- er of dra
day, it rained all day. hind the stag
But the bad weather didn't hurricane f
keep them from appearing as Charles," t
scheduled for the one o'clock "cruisin"' in
matinee, though it kept at least the song that
a third of the seats and the en- it.
tire lawn empty. When they
started with extended versions IN ALL, t
of "Ride The Tiger" and "Fast songs ranging
Buck Freddie", only the first ' plane materia
five to ten rows were filled . latest success

Sshines, in rain

this low turn-out
pointment for the
,ho had originally
concert. But they
resent an outstand-
modern roll 'n' roll.
ity of the audience
the group's defi-
up and, by the
down a huge post-
agon princess' be-
e and whipped with
force into "St.
hey were truly
the apt lyric of
had just preceded
hey performed 20
g from early Air-
al to the Starship's
ses but concentrat-

ing mostly on selections from group's dynamic presentation.
this summer's release, Spitfire. Various other members were
Marty Balin, founder of the Air- featured in solo spots for a
plane and lead vocalist, intro- change of pace every few songs.
duced a couple of new songs in- Grace Slick did a blues num-
cluding the standout "Shoot Me ber and John Barbata gave an'
Down" which effectively tied enthusiastic audience a lesson
flying imagery to a love song in highly visible drumming.
in the best tradition of the "Have You Seen The Saucers"
group. began with a 2001 instrumental
For some of the crowd, the intro and ended with bassist
high point was an updated Pete Sears, whose skateboard-
"Somebody To Love" that ing - broken leg had created
showcased various guitar styles the rainy day situation, alter-
of the '60's as diverse as basic nating between loping melodies
Rollin Stnes riffs totehand pounding rhythms.

plucking a la Jimi Hendrix.
Craig Chaquico was -the man
responsible and his fluid guitar
work was probably the single
most engaging aspect of the

Faculty concert sparkles

By SCOTT EYERLY ist Jerome Jelinek and reader-
actor John McCollum treated
T A S T SUNDAY afternoon the audience to Grant Beglar-
Rackham Auditorium was ian's Of Fables, Foibles and
awash with harpsichord glitter Fancies. This modern work
and clarinet song, complex pi- makes use of four amusing
ano work and bizarre, humor- texts, from folk tales, a news-
ous stories. The Fourth School Paper, and the work of writer
of Music Faculty Chamber Con- Harry Golden. Each presents
certs series was underway. some ironic or curious bit of
human nature, as the cello
Harpsichordist Edward Par- comments quirkily and descrip-
mentier began with pieces from tively on the matter.
Rameau's "Nouvelles suites de
Pieces de Clavecin." This 18th Thus the emphasis in these
century French composer en- last pieces was dramatic rath-
joyed notoriety for dissonances er than musical, although Beg-
and colorful effects, especially larian was resourceful in cello
in show pieces like "Les Sau- effects and crafted a pleasant
vages," transcribed from or- recurring theme. Character ac-
chestra. Parmentier, who is new cents were required, such as a
to the faculty this year, used dry British tone for "The
timbre alterations sparingly but Tree"; a true story about a
imaginatively. tribe that tries incredibly, to
The following Mozard Trio in kill trees by shouting at them

in early morning. At another
point the reader glares impa-
tiently at the cellist when in-
terrupted by his virtuoso spree.{
Jelinek and McCollom inter-
preted and integrated the dra-
ma excellently. The fiendish
cello part was never merely
technical, but in the mood of
McCollum's most creative de-
livery. And the audience loved
it.
Admission is free to all fac-
ulty concerts. The next, in
Rackham, is at 4 p.m. Sunday,
October 24.

THE STARSHIP concluded
their 2% hour set with the stn-
dard call to arms, "Volun-
teers," and came back for
three encores - "miracles,"
"White Rabbit" and "Goodbye
Goodbye." It was an exciting
mixture of both old and new
songs and the audience didn't
want to let them go.
So they came back for one
last number, "Dance With The
Dragon," which strangely set
the tone for the whole after-
noon. The song is an extreme-
ly passionate look at Ameri-
ca's social injustice:
It makes you want to get
away
You know you've got to
stay .,.
Yankee Doodle keep it up
Stick a feather in your cap!
and gave the standing fans a
realistic idea of what to expect
as they left to face the rain
once more and to reflect on our,
equally frustrating political out-
look.

" * . . @@@ . @ @ e @ @ S@@ . S "0* .. s .....**0" er"
TONIGHT!
WEST SIDE STORY
7 & 9:30 P.M.
William Shakespeare's plot and Leonard Bernstein's music
combine for the most dazzling musical of all time. "This
teeming-tenement teenage-gang version of Romeo and Juliet
brought a new dimension to movie musicals both in its social
content and its cinematic technique. The brilliance of the
dances and the design of the production are the chief dis-
tinctions of this film, marked by a near-hurricane energy in
its direction. . . . The Sharks and Jets fight scenes steal the
show."--Judith Grist. Natalie Wood, George Chakiris, Russ
Tamblyn, Richard Beymer, Rita Moreno.
WEST SIDE STORY IS TO BE SHOWN AT MLB, NOT
ANGELL HALL AS OUR SCHEDULE HAS IT.

Oa
oO

E flat Major, for clarinet, vio-
la and piano, is said by legend
to have been written while the
composed played ninepins.
Whether this is true or not,
the trio is beautifully airy and
clever. David Shifrin played
clarinet with magnificent tone,
especially in the most lyric sec-
tions. Also new this year, Shif-
rin comes from three years as
first chair of the Cleveland or-
chestra. Louis Nagel, pianist,
played in fine Mozart style, as
did Associate (student) Leo Na-
jar, on the viola, although he
was not always aggressive
enough.
PIANIST Benning Dexter per-
formed Finnev's taxing Varia-
tions on a Theme by Alban
Berg (1954). The theme, from
a violin concerto, is varied in a
flavor so similar to Berg's that
the result is not too distinctive
stylistically. Dexter chose an
interpretation more percussive
than that of his own recording.
To conclude the concert, cell-
- - -- - -- - - - - -

GROUP TRAINING
WORKSHOP
Expand counseling skills-
Work on personal issues-
Ongoing & Weekend
CALL
LIFEWORK
COUNSELING
995-0088 leave message for
Richard Kempter-Leader.

/4
SERGEI EISENSTEIN'S 1943
IVAN THE TERRIBLE I
Limited to the party line, Eisenstein turned to
history to present his vision of Russia. In films
like Alexander Nevsky and the two-part but un-
finished Ivan the Terrible, his cinematic imag-
ination was allowed to reign free. This story
of the first Czar to unite Russia is intense yet
perceptive,
WED.: Bergman's THE MAGICIAN
CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT AT CINEMA GUILD
7:00 & 9:05 Admission $1.25
RK CANOE LIVERY I

IN AUD. A, ANGELL HALL
Antonioni's BLOW-UP
7 & 9:30 P.M.
Based on a fine short story by Spaniard Julio Corazar. A mod
London photographer realizes after the fact that he might
have photographed a murder. The unreality of reality is the
basic theme. Music by Herbie Hancock, plus a sequence with
the YARDBIRDS with Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page. An extreme-
ly important film and the winner of top awards. David Hem-
mings, Vanessa Redgrave and Sarah Miles.
This showing has been added to replace the cancel-
lation of our earlier showing.
$1.25, DOUBLE FEATURE $2.00

TONIGHT AT 7 & 9
OPEN 6:45
EbromcuntPiures Presents
A Roman Polanski Film
TME
TnENANT
in Color A PoronrrxxPo xue

'i

ONE COMPLETE SHOW
AT 7:00 OPEN 6:45
HESTER STREET
PLUS
(R)
MEAN STREETS
ENDS THURSDAY

NEWS FROM THE
MAJOR EVENTS OFFICE
Welcome to Flash, the new weekly information
column brought to you by the U of M's Major
Events Office. We'll try to bring you concert and
record news from Ann Arbor to Los Angeles. If it's
a promise or a prediction, remember . . . you
heard it first in Flash .
Why isn't the Grateful Dead playing Ann
Arbor? Since they've knocked 'em "dead" in Hill
Auditorium twice before, there were hot and
heavy negotiations all summer. But when it came
to finalizing the routing, the only date fitting our
neighborhood was Saturday, October 2, and
Crisler had already been booked a year in ad-
vance. In case you're interested, it's the socko
Red Skeleton show,.
We hope Peter Frampton has recuperated from
his Toronto gig. He was so busy waving to the
audience that he fell off an eight-foot stage and
cracked a couple of ribs ...
If you think you sow Grace Slick and Paul
Kantner at the UM-Navy football game last Satur-
day, you were right. They called us and said they
wanted to see the Fighting Wolverines . . . they
had never seen Wolverines fight before .. .
Big news this week is the Steve Goodman-
V-sar Clements Concert, Friday night in Power
Center Vsar. the rardv of hoe-dnwn fiddling,

SHOWS TONIGHT
AT 7:00 & 9:00
OPEN 6:45

I.,

S

"I< TOVIE!
. I Mnii "Oie R t "RbrtG L'.. [ c~iV

SPECIAL RATESI

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