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September 21, 1976 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-21

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Tuesday, September Z T, 1976

I Ht Ml(.HJUAN DAILY

Pevev a !'tt ina

Tuesay, eptmber21,1976I M MIUil(AN LAI1

rage rvEne

r

OUTI
OAF
BOUNDS
by Rich Lerner
Bo's all smiles...
...andl rightfully so
B0 SCHEMBECHLER'S avacado and seafood salad tasted es-
pecially good at his luncheon with the local media, yester-
day. After all, anything would have tasted good after the Wol-
verines' demolition of Stanford Saturday.
What more could a fellow want? The offense rolled up 546
yards and 51 points, while the defense, a cause for concern the
week before, shut out the nation's best passing team. And he
can't even complain about the pollsters, not giving his Wolver-"
ines their proper recognition.
Nor did Dwight Hicks' hand surgery dampen Bo's mood. No
matter what the subject, Schembechler could only think of nice
things.
Bo shrugged off Michigan's non-existent passing attack
against the Cardinals. "When we go for 531 on the ground
we don't need a passing attack. They (Stanford) were throw-
ing the ball so much the fans were getting their money's
worth. So why should I?" Schembechler said.
"But we'll take to the air lanes this week," Schembechler
joked.
While Schembechler preferred to allow Stanford to do all the
passing Saturday, no one can complain that the Wolverine
offense is boring, notnwhen four different players rip off gains
of over 45 yards in one game.
With the offensive line opening Grand Canyon-like holes
and the speed of the Wolverine backfield, every play has the
potential of going all the way. Fullbacks on most teams just
don't run 85 yards untouched, up the middle.
The Wolverine backfield just may be the fastest in cil-
legiate history, Rob Lytle, Harlan Huckleby, and Russell Davis
all run track in the off-season.
Big playsa re fine, It . .
"I like being a big play team, but I don't like to depend on
them," said Schembechler. "I don't think you can count on that
kind of a ballgame consistently. We're not going to break those
kind of plays against Navy."

IDLE PHILLIES GAIN
Mets outslug Pirates, 5-4

11

7'f

GRIDlE PICKS

I

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uI

By The Associated P'ess
NEW YORK - Rookie Lee
Mazzilli slammed a two-run
homer with two out in the ninth
inning yesterday liftihg the New
York Mets to a 5-4 victory over
Pittsburgh, stalling he Pirates'
pennant drive.
The loss, Pittsburgh's third in
the four-game series against
the Mets, dropped the Pirates
4h games behind Philadelphia
in the National League East.
The Phils were idle.
The Pirates had erased an
early 3-0 deficit to take a 4-3
lead in the eight inning on:
WillieaStargell's 19th homer of
the season.
Pinch hitter John Milner sin-
gled off Pirates reliever Kent
Tekulve, 5-2, and Mazzilli,
who was brought up earlier
this month, followed with his
second home run of the season
over the fence in right center.
The Mets took a 3-0 lead in
the third inning, bunching five
singles off Pirates starter John
Candelaria.

Bud Harrelson led off the in- I ,e,, ! bit Rick Jones, 5-3, picked up the
ning with a single to right. Hit- victory in relief of Reggie Cleve-
and-run singles by Mazzilli and DETROIT-Cecil Cooper drove land. Seven different Red Sox
Felix Millan produced the Mets' in four runs with a homer and a players drove in runs as Boston
first run. Joe Torre, hitting an single and Jim Rice blasted two completed a four-game sweep
inside pitch, looped an opposite- solo homers last night to lead of Detroit.
field single to right, scoring, the Boston Red Sox to a 12-6 *
Mazzilli, then Dave Kingman rout of the struggling Detroit Yankees topped
hit a check-swing single to cen- Tigers.
ter, making it 3-0. Boston pounded out 13 hits MILWAUKEE -- Rookie Dan
The Pirates got their first and collected nine walks as Thomas' fourth-inning homer
run off Lolich in the fifth in- the Red Sox won their sixth and Don Money's two-run single
ning. With two out, Frank consecutive ame their lon helped the Milwaukee Brewers
Taveras lofted a fly ball to est winning streak of the sea- score a 4-2 victory over the
deep left center which Mets son. The loss was the sixth New York Yankees last night.
left fielder Pepe Mangual straight for Detroit. The defeat left the Yankees
dropped after a long run, , "magic" number for clinching
Taveras getting credit for a Cooper's homer followed a teAeia egeEs
triple. Rennie Stennett fol walk to Carlton Fisk in the sec- the American League East
lowed with a run-scoring ?ond inning and Dwight Evans tip Baltimore did not play and
double to center. added a solo homer. til .*, r by1 !

Eur an w

T '

Last week's winner of a one-item pizza from Pizza Bob's
was Dave Hochman, who correctly predicted 18 of the 20
games. To have a chance at that pizza (plus one item) your
Gridde must be in by Friday midnight.

1) Navy at MICHIGAN
(Pick score)
2) Orio State at Missouri
3) USC at Purdue
4) Western Michigan at Min-
nesota
5) Baylor at Illinois
6) Michigan State at N.C.
State
7) Notre Dame at Northwest-
ern
8) Indiana at Washington
9) Iowa at Penn State

10) Washington State at
Wisconsin
11) California at Arizona St.
12) The Citadel at Furman
13) South Carolina at Georgia
14) Tennessee at Auburn
15) Miami, Fla. at Colorado
16) San Jose St. at Stanford
17) Texas A&M at Houston
18) Virginia at Duke
19) Princeton at Rutgers
20) LAILY LIBELS vs. Busi-
ness Staff Burnouts

The Pirates
with two runs
Richie Hebner
single, and one
hitter Bob Ro
him home. T
with a single t
pinch runner
making it 3-3.

tied the score Boston sent 11 men to the
in the seventh. plate in the fourth to collect
led off with a'seven runs off three Tiger1
out later, pinch pitchers, with Cooper collecting

transi s ew YorKDtU 112
games, going into a four-game
series between the teams
which begins Tuesday.
Thomas' third homer since he

bertson doubled1
averas followed
o right, scoring
Miguel Dilone,

a two-run single among the four was called up from Pittsfield of
hits. Rice belted his first homer the Eastern League September
in this inning, then added his 1 broke a 2-2 tie. The blast came
second blast of the night and off loser Ken Holtzman, 13-10.
23rd of the season in the ninth. The Brewers scored an insur-
_ ance run in the eighth after
I- j . r - - - 1- - 7 - - - - -

Stabler passes burn Chiefs
as Oakland triumphs, 24-21

eadoff singles by Lezcano and
Scott. Two successive passed
balls by Yankee catcher Thur-
man Munson scored Lezcano.

Mixed Bowling Leagues
Now Forming
SIGN UP NOW
UNION LANES
OPEN: 11 a.m. Mon.-Sat.; 1 p.m. Sunday
See us for pinball-18 machines
A N IGIAU d AAFLM CC-CUD I
I TON IGHT!-"In Aud. A Angell Hall

KANSAS CITY (Y) - Oak-'
land quarterback Ken Stabler,
using the forward pass like a
surgical instrument, carved
through the Kansas City de-
fense for 224 yards and three
touchdowns last night as the
Raiders held off the Chiefs 24-

i1

21.
Stabler, before leaving the

However, come Saturday, you can bet Michigan will break a game in the fourth quarter with
few more long plays. Huckleby, Lytle, Rich Leach, Jim Smith a strained right knee, complet-
and Davis can't be collared for 60 minutes. ed 22 of 28 passes.
Navy coach George Welsh has called the Michigan back- The Chiefs, 0-2, completely
field the best college backfield he has ever seen. As an as- outclassed by the unbeaten
sistant to Joe Paterno in 1971; Welsh coached the offensive Raiders in the first half,
sacistat htohJoe claternorinc197, rWescoaedlthellcharged back in the second.
backfield which Included Franco Harris, Lydell Mitchell and I They got a pair of touchdowns
John Hufnagel- on a one-yard run by Mac-
In fact, this year's Wolverine backfield may be rated as one Arthur Lane in the third per-
of the best college backfields of all-time -- up there with the iod and by quarterback Mike
Four Horsemen of Notre Dame, Glen Davis and Doc Blanchard Livingston in the fourth.
of Army, SMU's Doak Walker and Kyle Rote combination, and Then they cut the final mar-
the Syracuse backfield of the mid-60s with Larry Csonka and gin to a field goal - a 37-yard-
Floyd Little. er by Oakland's Fred Steinfort
Lytle and Smith will probably ea" H-\merica honors this in the second quarter - when
Livingston passed 25 yards to
year and by 1978 Huckleby, Leach, a, . is (sophomores all) Billy Masters with 2:53 to play.
should etch their names into the All-Amcrican annals. The Raiders totally domi-
Michigan averages an amazing 7.7 yards per carry after nated the first half, amassing
the first two games. Lytle has the lowest average of the five, a 16 first downs and 288 total
paltry 5.1 yards per crack. yards while the Chiefs managed

the half, Stabler used 12 plays
to pilot the Raiders from
their 14-yard line to the
Chiefs' 20, where the drive
stalled and Steinfort booted
a 37-yard field goal.
Coming out smoking in the
second half, Kansas City moved
from its 46 to the Raider two-
yard line on seven straight
rushes. Two smashes into the
middle by Lane made it 17-7.
But the Raiders stormed
right back, behind Stabler's
passing. Siani snared Stabler's
third touchdown strike, a 14-
yarder that gave the Raiders a
24-7 lead,
Livingston then directed the
Chiefs 87 yards on 12 plays to
move within 10 points at 24-14.
On their next possession, the

Raiders fumbled on their own
25-yard line and the Chiefs had
a chance to get within three.
Livingston, scrambled to his
right and connected with Billy
Masters in the end zone with
2:53 on the clock.,
Kansas City, in a desperation
move, tried an on-sides kick-
but Oakland successfully field-
ed it and ran out the clock.

GROUP TRAINING
WORKSHOP
Expand counselinq skills-
Work on personal issues-
Ongoing & Weekend
CALL
LIFEWORK
COUNSELING
995-0088 leave message for
Richard Kempter-Leader.

JEAN COCTEAU'S
LES ENFANTS TERRIBLE

1949

I

I
I

Beset by a case of the dropsy against Wisconsin (three fum-
bles), Lytle recovered nicely against Stanford gaining 101 yards
in 19 carries and two touchdowns.
"Lytle was sensational," said Schembechler. "He was our
best player on offense. On every play he did something. He
either knocked somebody over or carried the ball or made
a fake. He blocks the corner and he blocks inside."
Smith great natural at lete
'Smith also drew Schembechler's praise.
"He's a great rmner, a great receiver, he returns punts and
kicks. When you talk about important football players, there's
one," Schembechler effused. "Tie could play tailback, fullback,
split end, tight, end, defensive back, or outside linebacker. He
can play anywhere. He'd be a hell of an option quarterback, he's
just a natural athlete.
"He's the only plaver I've ever told that he would come inX
and start for me as a freshman. I told Leach he'd have a chance
to start as a freshman but Smith is the only one I promised."
Huckleby, ouickly becoming a household word, has amassed
288 yards in only 35 carries. And because of his blazing outside
soeed defenses have had to pay him extra attention, opening
things for his r1un-ina-mates.
Lench's n-qIde ramnins ineomiwtent. however the Flint
flash has nouichld the ji'hiran nation attack. raverring 9.6
yards on keenars. wvi. a 6-3, 220-noind 9.9 sprinter (he also
hiyh i'mos G9) has inst begun to show his votential.
Bo was in such a wood mood yesterday that even the up-
coming onnorent didn't seem to worry him. S hembechler Prais-
ed Na-v's middle guard, but other than that he didn't tout the
Mi.shinmen.
Michigan shonld have no tronhle in winning the first election
year match-im of the nresidential candidate's alma maters (Car-
ter attended Navy) since 1912, when Princetone (Woodrow Wilson,
Harvard (Teddy Roosevelt), and Yale (William Howard Taft)
met each other on the gridiron.

only two first downs and 37
yards over-all.
With time running out in

Got the Gutts?
Any persons interestedin
forming a 5-man Guts Fris-
bee league, with a possibili-
ty of approaching the I-M de-
partment for sanction, should
call or see Rick Olshansky,
4033 Alice Lloyd Hall, 764-5911.
Special Rates
This Weekend
BOWUNG
at 510e per gz e
1-6 p.m. Now thru Sat.
Michigan Union

SUN PHOTO
1 ay
Color Print Service POESN A
20% discount on
Kodak processin
EASY DRIVING AND
PARKING
3180 Packard
1 blk. E. of Platt
913-0110
Hours: 830-9:00 M & F
8:30-5:30, T, W, T, S

MODIFY YOUR
UNDESIRABLE BEHAVIORS
IF YOU WANT TO:
1) LOSE WEIGHT
2) STOP CIGARETTE SMOKING
3) INCREASE STUDY SKILLS
4) STOP BITING FINGER NAILS
5) EXERCISE MORE FREQUENTLY
6) MEET MORE PEOPLE
7) COMPLETE YOUR DISSERTATION
8) CHANGE OTHER MINOR
MALADAPTIVE BEHAVIORS
Students in Psvcholoav 414 (Advanced Laboratory in
Behavior Modification} in Cooperation with the Insti-
tute of Behavior Change, will work with You in chana-
ina Your undesirable behaviors.
For Registration Information CALL: 994-3332
2200 FULLER RD.-Suite 209

S

7:00 P.M. ONLY
This lyrical treatment of Jean Cocteau's perverse tribute to
rebellious adolescence has rarely been seen in America. One
of the most electrifying confrontations of normality in all
cinema. A special event. "One of the most exciting films of our
time."-Pauline Kael. French with subtitles.
LUIS BUNUEL'S 1969
THE MILKY WAY (La Voae Lactee)
AUD. A-9 P.M. only
Two beggars on a pilgrimage witness encounters and adven-
ture whichtseem to take placetanywhere-in Bethlehem or
Spain, in the first century or the seventeenth. The episodes
are presented with a total absence of logical or temporal order,
as in dreams. The surrealist structure skillfully executed by
the master Bunuel makes THlE MILKY WAY a delightful,
sacrilegious comedy not to be missed. French with subtitles.
TONIGHT 1N MLB 3 7 & 9
KING OF HEARTS
(Phillipe de Broca, 1967)
Our most popllar film. A Scottish soldier during W.W. II is
sent to a French town, evacuated except for an asylum.
Meanwhile, the fleeing Germans have left a time bomb. The
asylum inmates escape, taking up various costumes and roles.
A very funny comedy and a powerful anti-war film-the
sanity of insanity and vice-versa. Alan Bates, Benevieve Bujold.
"Delightfully subtle satire-penetrating comedy encased in a
most beautiful film."-Judith Crist.

t
A {
i{
I
mom

I,

i
3
I
k

r

We take this space to pay tri-
buite to our (a) fearless, (b)
hairless leader as he enters into
the 'golden ae' of life. Ile is
known far and wide for his in-
valhable service to this denart-
mont - e'h as hi s traitilt-n-
ing un of the blletin hoard
constantlv. Ymi're a petty ty-
rant. but we love you.
JSCORS'
- -
BASEBPALL
New York 5, Pittsburgh 4
Boston 12, Detroit 6
Milwaukee 4, New York 2
Bill Stieg 21.

ANNOUNCING OUR
GRAND OPENING
FAIR CINIC
UNI-SEX SALON
323 E. WILLIAM j
A Salon of Distinction
and Full Family Service
Mondav and Friday
9-9
Tues-Thurs. and Sat.
9-S
Op^.n Eveninns by Aooointment
665-0395
CONSULT US FOR YOUR
HAIR CARE NEEDS

THE RUDOLF STEINER INSTITUTE
OF THE GREAT LAKES AREA
announces TWO LECTURES by
ELIZABETH LEBRET
MUSIC TEACHER AT WALDORF SCHOOLS AND
SCHOOLS FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
"RUDOLF STEINER'S IMPULSES TOWARDS
THE RENEWAL OF MUSIC"
Saturday, Sept. 25, 1976, at 8 p.m.
"WHAT CAN MUSIC EDUCATION DO
FOR OUR PRE-SCHOOLERS?"
Sunday, Sept. 26, 1 976, at 2 p.m.
RUDOLF STEINER HOUSE
1923 GEDDES AVENUE, ANN ARBOR
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC ADMISSION FREE

I16
LI £

I

Thur., Sept. 23 4-6 p.m. Pendleon Lounge

I

Lecture-Discussion

2nd fl. Mich. Union

There IS a difference!:
-*MCAT -"LSAT -"DAT
e GMAT .CPAT eVAT .GRE *.OCAT "SATI

"DEIFICATION OF THE SELF"
Peter Marin's critical reflections on the new religious and
humanistic movements.
" . His insightful feature article in Harper's (October,
1975, "The New Narcissism" caught our eye, Then we
discovered he was the resident moralist and critic of the
Association for Humanistic Psychology and had some im-

. NATIONAL MED. & DENT. BOARDS
. ECFMG ."FLEX
Flexible Programs and Hours

. , ;
r

Aft JAW

I

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liU 11'1L

Itl I f9

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