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September 21, 1976 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-21

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 21, 19761

Poqe Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY
ruesdav, SeDtember 21. 1976
U U-'

t ,..

Paid PoliticalAdvertisement
DEMOCRATIC ACTION FUND RAISER
MEET THE CANDIDATES

i

Ford, Carter clash Council

Riegle, Esch clash at Cobo

over tax reform

restricts
day care

(Continued from Page 1)
legislative records in the ten
years both of them have served'
in Congress. During the press
conference, Esch summoned up
some anger in an apparent at-
tempt to provoke anger from '

industrialists, several of whom;
have contributed substantially
to Esch's campaign. He seemed
co fident and at home with the
audience, and he consistently
put Riegle on the defensive with'

noted for ontstanding leadership
by Time Magazine, Newsweek
Magazine, and the U.S. Jaycees,
and said, "I think the judgment
of those (institutions) is a little
more fair-minded that that of

Perry Bullard

Fred
Hillary
Goodard

Postill
George
Steek

ANN ARBOR ARMORY
223 E. Ann
SATURDAY, Sept. 25th
8:00 P.M -1:00 A.M.
487-2900

Janet Kiovey
Tom Shirley
Blessing Sheppard
Students $1
Others $5
25c per beer

(Continued from Page 1)
". .I think it's time for the
very wealthy in America, who
have managed to avoid all or
most of their taxes, to begiven
a chance to join the rest of us
aid to pay their share of sup-
porting this wonderful country."
' Meanwhile, Playboy magazine
released an interview in which
the Democratic nominee said
his religious beliefs give him
"a sense of peace and equani-
mity and assurance," but that
"I'm human and I'm tempted."
"Christ set some almost im-
nossible standards for us.
Christ said, 'I tell you that
anyone who looks on a woman
with lust has in his heart al-

, , charges of legislative inactivity
"I'VE LOOKED on a lot of Riegsle.giiiieincivt my opponent."
women with lust," he continued. (Continued from Page ) Riegle. and incompetence.
"I've committed adultery in about day care centers? he AFTER ONE OR two calm During ahalf-hour long ques-
asked. answers to questions, Esch sud- "I THINK the people of Mich- tion-and-answer session before
my heart many times. This is " H E N COUNCILMAN denly said heatedly, "If you're igan would like to know why it the Club Riegle tried to brh
something that God recognizes Gen hw eteday Igigt eaeteiseRe h lb igetidt rs
I will do - and I have done it Greene shows me the diary of gog to debate the issues I is that he (Riegle) has never de Esch's barb
the calls he's received, I'll show gle, debate the issues. I'm not itte (ilet has eer asi s and talk
-- and God forgives me for it.gonyorprwrteabiltahabene-autaedtocaehrm y
But that doesn't mean that I him mine," snapped Henry. going to talk about your per- about a need to create harmony
dnBertoia then listed his own ob-sonal life. I want to debate the acted into law, has never been between business and labor. He
condemn someone who not only Brtithnlsehsowob I issues."? a floor leader for a single piece' responded several times to
looks on a woman with lust, but jections to unregulated day care
who leaves his wife and shacks centers. "These people don't "If you're going to bet that of legislation, whether it won Esch's questions about his rec-
up with somebody out of wed- always have the ability or the excited you'll probably need a: or lost, and he's never even had ord, but said, "My candidacy
lock," he said. capital to care for the site they transquilizer to calm down," an amendment adopted by the doesn't have anything to do with
operate out of," he said. Riegle replied. 'Hueo ersnaie, sh
Carter said that because of "Irhave a certain kinship to The Economic Club is made House of Representatives," Esch him (Esch). He's not really one
his religious beliefs, he does residential areas," Bertoia con- up of prominent Detroit area said. to comment on my record. I'm
not think he "would ever take tinued. "And I believe people businesspersons, attorneys, and Riegle said that he had been quite proud of my record."
former presidents Nixon or ity for input." He urged Coun- iGO a t a t in l r w
and distorting the truth." the hysteria level." GEO attracts sm all cro d
COUNCILWOMANI
Polar lights, known as Aur- Liz Keogh (D-First Ward) said (continued from Page 1) dramaticall
ora Borealis or Northern Lights she had a kinship to residential tin ;tne fo ag )damtcly increases." ;greater numbers to a Diag mag-
or tBoresr Norther Lig d a kYhi to rsiel tion. Chief University Bargain- iThe class size issue was a ic show than to the pickets.
in the northern hemisphere and areas, too. "You think I live in er, John Forsyth summed upI~ fiery one during the last GEO And even those who took hand-
Aurora Australis in the south- a tent on the Diag?" she asked his team's nosition saving..1 . :;n. .. i1o 'M-.. ._ .

ready committeed adultery,"'
said Carter.

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Bertoia.
An attempted compromise
amendment by Mayor Pro Tem
Louis Belcher (R-Fifth Ward),
which would have allowed day
care centers to bypass the ZBA
if they were more than 500
feet from an existing center,
was narrowly defeated. After
a short recess, Council conven-
ed to pass the original ordi-
nance.
Democratic Council members
believe Wheeler will veto the
measure, however. Under the
terms of the City Charter, he
has three days to do so once
the city clerk has given him a
copy of the ordinance.

" strike i Fei uary 2975. he outs explaining the Union's de-
"There' s plenty of time between University had its way that maads for smaller classes were
now and October 5th to get aj time, and there was no classI not always interested. At one
contract but part of that means size clause in the contract. But point, 20 students passed two
they've (GEO's) got to modify the Union has not given up, pickets and only five took hand-
some of their stands. and has included it in this outs - and four of those dis-
"AND IF THERE are some'is- year's demands. GEO wants to posed of them in the first trash
sues they say they absolutely set a limit on the number of can.
won't move on," he continued, students allowed in any class, "Most people just walked right
"then I'm afraid we won't be i along with establishing a ratio past them," said LSA senior
able to avoid a strike. Assured-|of Graduate Student Assistants Martha Solinger. "They (the
ly we've moved as much as (GSA's) and Students Assist- picketers) didn't look like they
we're going to move on most ants (SA's) to the number of cared much either. If they go
issues." undergraduates. The University on strike I doubt if very many
Still, both GEO and Univer- refuses to discuss the issue say- students will support them."
sity negotiators say they are ing it is an academic matter,, "HELL," SAID Sharon Kurzin
determined to avert what could and therefore not appropriate who walked past the pickets
be the second massive Gradu- in a labor contract. without so much as a glance,
ate Student Assistant (GSA)' "Having rallies on the Diagj"they just got a new contract
walkout in 18 months. Hopes is not going to get class size; a year and a half ago, and now
appear to be hinged on the in the contract," Forsyth quip- they want more? I missed 5
mediation effort. ped when informed of the rally.( weeks of some classes becau~se
"If we don't get an agree- APPARENTLY, the event did of them last time, and that real-
ment in mediation I don't know; not carry much weight, withj ly fucked me up. No way would
how we're going to do it," said GSAs, too busy with beginning- I support another GEO strike."
Forsyth. "If that doesn't resolve of-classes paperwork to attend, But, not everyone echoed these
it the probability of a strike nor students, who flocked in sentiments. Dan Hardy said he

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liked what GEC) was trying to
do."
"In my four years here, the
best classes I've had have been
the small ones. Sure I'd support
a GEO strike," he added," I
supported it last time, I even
picketed for them. That was one
of the best times I've ever had."
Nancy
IMehta
talks
(continued from Page 5)
"I travel nine months out of
the year, with Zubin," she said.
"I have a peripheral status dur-
ing those months as the wife of
the conductor, and feel that I
make no constructiye contribu-
tions to his work except as a
companion."
Despite "People's Liberation,"
Nancy maintains that "life on
the road is too strenuous for a
woman."
"I know no one else who feels
so strongly about their home
life; I have a very warm, al-
most childlike feeling about our
home," she added.

LUTHER ALLISON
THE BEST ANN ARBOR BLUESMAN!
516 E. LIBERTY 994-5350

ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER
921 CHURCH STREET (between Hill and Oakland)
(An ecumenical international ministry)
presents a series of fall programs for students and faculty
TUESDAY LUNCH-DISCUSSIONS
(beginning September 21 )
"NUCLEAR ENERGY AND HUMAN SURVIVAL"
DR. JAMES DUDERSTUDT, Prof. of Nuclear Engineering
These lunch-discussions addressing topics of international importance will be held each
Tuesday during the fall and winter terms. Lunch begins at 12 noon and the program
cocludes by 1 p.m. Lunch (75c) is prapared and served by Church Women United.
DISTINGUISHED FACULTY SERIES
WITH LECTURES BY
DR. FRANK H.T. RHODES-Friday, Sept. 24
VICE-PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
"THE UNIVERSITY AND THE INDIVIDUAL"
DR. Al A. MAZURI-Friday, Oct. 15
Professor of Political Science
"JUDAISM, CHRISTIANITY, AND THE BLACK EXPERIENCE"
DR. ROBBEN W. FLEMING-Friday, Oct. 22
President-of the University
"THE UNIVERSITY AND ITS ROLE IN THE WORLD COMMUNITY"
DR. PAUL W. McCRACKEN-Friday, Nov. 12
Edmund Ezra Day Professor of Business Administration
"ECONOMICS FOR AN INTERDEPENDENT WORLD"

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