100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 19, 1976 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Page EigFt,'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, September 19, 1976

Page Eight' THE MICHIGAN DAILY

l
r

music theory
classes .
Our fifteen-week Fall course in the fundamentals
of music combines the traditional disciplines of
harmony, counterpoint, form and analysis with an
exploration of music history and the creations of
today's avant-garde composers. In addition to the
two-hour Tuesday evening classes, each student re-
ceives a weekly private lesson. Here, the student
may try his hand at original composition, develop
skills in keyboard harmony, examine music of par-
ticular interest to himself, or review material covered
during previous classes. Through participation in this
course both the informed listener as well as the pro-
fessional musician will find their understanding of
musical principles sharpened and expanded.
classes begin September 21
the music studio
555 e. william 994-5404
Thur., Sept. 23 4-6 p.m. Pendleon Lounge

HARRIERS OPEN '76 SEASON:
Meyer wins

at EMU

By ERNIE DUNBAR
Greg Meyer turned twenty-one
yesterday and he couldn't have
asked for a better birthday
present. Running a majority of
the race by himself, Meyer
cruised through Eastern Michi-
gan's five-mile course in 24:31.6
to win the eighth annual EMU
Open.
After the 220 mark, Meyer
took command of the race and
had only a brief challenge from
Ypsi Uniteds' Tom Hollander.
Hollander closed Meyers 60-
yard gap at the two-and-a-half-
mile mark, but could only stay
with the fleet-footed senior from
Grand Rapids for just over a
mile.
Meyer regained his lead in
the last mile after EMU offi-
cials apparently guided him to
the wrong part of the course.
"They (the officials) pointed i
me the wrong way twice," said
Mever. "The one time I had
just finished making a move
on Hollander, and that (the
course mistake) enabled him to
get back in to the race." j
Even though Meyer recorded
the fifth fastest time ever run
on the Eastern course, he still;
wasn't completely satisfied.
"Right now I'm fit enough to
run thirty to forty seconds fast-

er on this course. It was the saw yesterdays race as a good
first race and the first time this kickoff to a season he hopes
season having somebody to run will lead to a Mid-American
along side of, so it'll take a Conference Championship.
while before I get used to it

"It sort of scares
"I'm happy as hell though. Parks, referring to
The time is sort of insignificant. fine performance.
I wish it had been faster but far along for this t
it wasn't," said Meyer. "It's no season. But we'res
big deal. Winning is what's im- that good of shape.'
nortant. I couldn't ask for a bet-

me," said
his team's
"We're to
ime of the
still not in

Lecture-Discussion

2nd fI. Mich. Union

PU - .L
ter way to start."
Coach Ron Warhurst felt his
team was right on scheduleto
defend its Big Ten and Central
Collegiate Conference titles.
"It's perfect," Warhurst said
of his team's performance. "No-
body was feeling spunky because
of the hard week of training we
had. But we held two of our top
guys out (Bill Donakowski and
Jay Anstaett) so we're right
where we want to be at this
part of the season."
Steve Elliott took fifth (25:04);
Mark Foster eighth (25:13), and
Doug Sweazy came across four-
teenth in 25:28, to round out
Michigan's top finishers.
Host Eastern Michigan turn-
ed in the most impressive
team performance, as it placed
its first five runners in the
top twelve. Taking third,
fourth, seventh, ninth, and
twelfth, the Hurons would
have captured the team title
if a team score had been
kept.j
Eastern's coach, Bob Parks,

Yesterday was not just a sud-
den vein of success for the
Hurons.
"Wealways run well here,"
said Parks. "We've only lost
twice in 10 years on this
course."
Since Eastern is usually one
of the top teams fighting for
a NCAA berth in November,
Saturday's race should have
caused some concern for War-
hurst. But the Wolverine coach
was his usual confident self.
"Two years ago, Eastern put
four guys in front ofGreg and
then we came back and skunk-
ed them. Last year they had
three runners in front of our
number one guy and look how
we finished out the season."
With Donakowski and An-
staett out, plus an injury which
forced Jack Sinclair out of the
race, Michigan was far from
full strength. Still the Wol-
verines ran a competitive five
miles, and gave a preview of
the potential power the team
possesses.

"DEIFICATION OF THE SELF"
Peter Marin's critical reflections on the new religious and
humanistic movements.
''..His insightful feature article in Harper's (October,
1975, "The New Narcissism" caught our eye. Then we
discovered he was the resident moralist and critic of the
Association for Humanistic Psychology and had some im-
portant things to say about the so called "joys of self-
love." Mr. Marin will address himself tc the issues of
moral blindness and selfishness and psychic health. Mr.
Marin has had a varied career as consultant to HEW,
Washington, D.C.; educator, counselor; and- author.
THURS. MORNING
Informal conversation 10:12 a.m. 3204 Mich. Union
Lounge-Office of Ethics and Religion
FOR INFORMATION-ETHICS AND RELIGIAN-764-7442

Special

next week

Bowling
50/game
11 A.M.-5 P.M.
Monday-Saturday
Michigan Union

I

GAYNESS and SPIRITUALITY
Sundays at 3 p.m. at Canterbury House
Gay people who are interested in spirituality in whatever form meet
each Sunday at Canterbury, corner of Catherine and Division.
Sept. 19-OPEN HOUW with wine and buffet
Sept. 26-mprovizational Theater on Gay Themes
Oct. 3-Canoe Trip (leave Canterbury at 1 p.m.)
Oct. 10-Discussion on "The Myth of Homosexuality"
Oct. 17-Gertrude Stein film
Oct. 24-Potluck and Planning Meeting
CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. DIVISION STREET
FOR INFORMATION CALL 665-0606

TONIGHT in MLB 4
A rare chance to see two masterpieces of the Czechoslo-
vakian Film Renaissance.
JIRI MENZEL'S
Closely Watched Trains
(1966) 7 & 10:30
An idealistic young man working in a train station in Bohemia
during the Nazi occupation and his growing awareness of
sexuality form the basic plot of this poignant movie. "The
artistry and richness of the comedy in CLOSELY WATCHED
TRAINS emerges with a subtlety and freshness that mark it
as superior and unique."-New York Times. Czech with sub-
titles.
IVAN PASSER'S
Intimate Lighting
(1965) 8:45 ONLY
A brilliant film that depicts the way the rhythms of music
mirror the rhythms of life. A Prague musician brings his mis-
tress to a small town to give a concert. There he meets an
old friend from the conservatory who has settled into pro-
vincial life. Lush photography by Miroslav Ondricek. "There
are several scenes that are gems of spontaneous, off-handed,
rather microscopic humor, nonetheless fraught with total
humane sympathy."-John Simon. Czech with subtitles.
$1.25, DOUBLE FEATURE $2.00

AP Photo
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA running back Ken Kitzmann" is tripped up by Washing-
ton State defensive end Tom Thompson in a -tion yesterday at Minneapolis. Kitzmann and
the Gophers were rarely so frustrated, howe;er, as they downed the Cougars 28-14.
Rookie QB guides Spartan
triumph over Wyoming, 21-10

0

r
(."

i

For First Year
Students
and
Underclass
Students

By The Associated Press
EAST LANSING, Mich. -
Quarterback Ed Smith, playing
his first college football game,
threw two touchdown passes
yesterday and guided Michigan
State to a 21-10 victory over
Wyoming.
S M I T H, a junior, tossed a
9-yard flip to fullback Levi Jack-
son and flung a 27-yard strike
to flanker Kirk Gibson as the
first half ended to hand MSU
coach Darryl Rogers his first
victory with the Spartans.
Smith sat out last week's
opening game with Ohio State
under an NCAA suspension.
THE MSU defense, recovered
from a quick Cowboy touchdownI
in the game's opening minutes,
and held Wyoming to a fieldI
goal by Dan Christopulos in the
second quarter.
For the Cowboys, it was the
fourth straight loss to Big Ten
teams in Wyoming history, andj
it evened their season record
at 1-1 - the same as Michigan
State's. .
Purdue rounded
"OUTH BEND, Ind. - Jun-
ior halfback Al Hunter ran
for one touchdown and passed
for another yesterday as run-
conscious Notre Dame ground
out a 23-0 victory over Purdue.
Punter picked up 96 yards on
23 carries, his career best, and
threw a 33-yard scoring pass
to running mate Mark McLane.
Fullback Jerome Heavens add-
ed 73 yards on 21 carries.
NOTRE DAME. which led 3-0

I Reeve, led 10-0 at the half af-
ter Hunter's pass to McLane
And wrapped it up with a one
yard touchdown plunge by quar-
terback Rick Slager midway
into the third quarter.
The Irish added their last
score on Hunter's two-yard run
early in the third period.
All three Notre Dame touch-
downs were set up by Purdue
mistakes - a muffed faked
punt, an offsidepenalty that
nullified the Boilermakers' block
of an Irish field goal and a pass
interception.
Gophers roll
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. - Sen-
ior fullback Jim Perkins scored
'two touchdowns on short runs
and freshman kicking special-
ist Paul Rogind kicked field
goals of 25 and 36 yards, lead-
ing Minnesota to a 28-14 vic-
tory over Washington State yes-
terday.
SOPHOMORE Kent
Kitzman gained 111 yards in
22 carries for the Gophers, who
piled up 295 yards on the
ground.
the Gophers are now 2-0.
Badorc burn
MADISON, Wis. - Wiscon-
sin, snarked by Mike Morgan's
91 yards in nine carries and
two 10-vard scoring runs by Ira
Matthews, scored on four of
its first five possessions and
rolled to a 43-9 college football
victory over ontmanned North
Dakota yesterday.
M A T T H E W S. Morgan

NOTICE TO
APARTMENT HOUSE
OWNERS

Ann Arbor Cablevision's New Up-coming Home Cinema
cannot be received on ordinary MATV wiring systems. It
will be necessary to make changes which the Cablevision
System will do at its own expense for the convenience of
your tenants.
Please contact us for details - the sooner the better, as we
expect a deluge of orders.

PRE MEDICAL (Health
Sciences)
INFORMATION MEETING
CA RE E R
ion. Sept. 2 ..
OR
Tues. Sept. 28-730 p.m.
Planning t
Placement Auditorium B, Angell Hall
Information on Course Planinng,
Medical School Requirements, Cre-
dentials, Prospects for Admission

on respective runs of 10, 43 and
14 yards as the Badgers opened
a 21-0 lead with 56 seconds
left in the first quarter.
North Dakota, 9-0 in regular
season play last year, had on-
ly one first down and 30 net
yards up to that point.
* * *
Iowa romps
IOWA CITY, Iowa - Junior
Ernie Sheeler and Freshman
Tom Renn scored two .touch-
downs each as Iowa overpower-
ed Syracuse, 41-3, in an intersec-
tional home - opener football
clash yesterday.
A crowd of 54,129 saw Iowa
even its record at 1-1, while
Coach Frank Maloney's Orange-
men fell to 0-2.
Hoosiers humbled
B L O O M I N G T O N,
Ind. - Tailbacks Monte An-
thony and Richard Berns com.
bined for 167 yards and scored
two touchdowns each yesterday
as eighth - ranked Nebraska
manhandled injury - riddled
and error - plagued Indiana 45-
13.
The Cornhuskers, who fell
from the No. 1 ranking after
nlaving a 6-6 tie with Louisiana
State last week, struck for two
touchdowns within a five-min-
ute stretch in the first quarter
and were in control the rest of
the way.
W le hs blanked
CHAPEL HILL, N. C. - Tom
Biddle kicked two field goals
and 17th ranked North Caro-
lina scored a third period touch-
down to defeat Northwestern
12-0 yesterday for their third
straight victory of the college
football season.

.

M

CHARLES NICHOLS
General Manager, Ann Arbor Cablevision, Inc.
PHONE 769-4707

N

Note: The above applies to series wired complexes
will not be effected -- please check with us.

parallel wired buildings

ALL YOU CAN EAT FOR

A career in law-
without law school.

on a 39-yard field goal by Dave and Lawrence Canada
LIBRARY PREVIEW 1976
Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday
September 21-22-23
2:00, 3:00, 4.00, 7:00, 8:00
Multipurpose Room, Undergraduate Library

scoredl
-t

II

I

'I

NOR T H W E S T E RN
nlaved without its star quarter-
back, Randy Dean, who did
not make the trip because of ill-
ness.
Northwestern's deepest pene-
tration was to the Tar Heel 41
in the closing seconds of their
second straight loss.
SBig 10 Standings
Conf. All Games
W L W L Pct.

$595
Chicken, Fish & Beef entrees
Dinners served at your table 2-9 p.m. Sunday
- -i

What can you do with only a bachelor's degree?
Now there is a way to bridge the gap between an
undergraduate education and a challenging, respon-
sible career. The Lawyer's Assistant is able to do
work traditionally done by lawyers.
Three months of intensive training can give you
the skills-the courses are taught by lawyers. You
choose one of the seven courses offered-choose
the city in which you want to work.
Since 1970, The Institute for Paralegal Training
has placed more than 1600 graduates in law firms,
banks, and corporations in over 75 cities.
If you are a senior of high academic standing and
are interested in a career as a Lawyer's Assistant,
we'd like to meet you.
Contact your placement office for an interview with
our representative.

U

INIMPP-.

fajas and cnuspas
belts and pouches
elegantly handwoven
by Bolivian Indians
I L U

I
I
1
i
t

MICHIGAN 1
Illinois . 1
Vlinnesota . 1
Ohio State ..... 1
Purdue ....... 1
Iowa .. 0
Michigan State . 0
Wisconsin .. 0
Indiana . 0
Northwestern 0

0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1

2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
0
0

0 1.000
0 1.000
0 1.000
0 1.000
1 .500
1 .500
1 .500
1 .500
2 .000
2 .000

We will visit your campus on
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 12
aind

0

OPEN
A T

TODAY
._

III

IF

Al

I

a

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan