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September 15, 1976 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-15

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, September 15, 1976

AFL-CIO won't back Pierce

Moynihan, Buckley

-r--

(Continued from Page 1)
support me where a good many
local unions came out for me."
Under a no-endorsement de-
cision, AFL-CIO guidelines for-
bid union officers from form-
ally taking part in fund-raisingj
activities on behalf of Pierce.

"THEY DID not want to go
against Carl Pursell because,
apparently, on some key labor
votes in the Senate, he was
there," said Pierce.
Also involved in the decision
was Pierce's relatively limited
political background. The fact
that Pierce was somewhat of

1 help make up an estimated
$80,000 campaign budget.
Asked if he thought the lack
of dn Pnir~atu ld h r

THE DECISION was reached an unknown quantity next to
last weekend by the AFL-CIO's 'Pursell also seemed to play a
political affairs branch, the major role in the decision.
Committee for Political Educa- "I was only on City Council
tion (COPE). for two years," noted Pierce,
Pierce's bid for the endorse- 'and every chance I got to sup-
ment was apparently thwarted port labor, I did, but I just
largely through the strong pro- didn't getrall that many oppor-
labor reputation established by tunities.
Pursell during his 6 years in the
legislature. According to some "I THINK if I had had a state
observers, AFL - CIO officials lgsaiercri ih
were reluctant to abandon Pur- legislative record, it might
sell in the face of his pro- have made the difference,' he
union record. concluded.
P i e r c e recognised Pur- Despite the neutral stance of
sell's solid pro-labor creden- AFL-CIO state officials, Pierce
tials as a factor in the deci- said he expected many local
sion. union officers would pitch in to
r_____-- ____--

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HOUSING DIVISION
RESIDENT STAFF APPLICATIONS
FOR 1976-77 ACADEMIC YEAR
Available Starting September 10, 1976
In Housing Office
1500 S.A.B.
POSITIONS INCLUDE:
Resident Advisor-Thronson, South Quad
(Undergraduate Female Corridor)
Resident Advisor-Bush, South Quad
(Undergradaute Female Corridor)
Resident Advisor-Huber, South Quad
(Undergraduate Male Corridor)
Resident Advisor-Helen Newberry
(Undergraduate Female Corridor)
Resident Advisor-Rumsey, West Quad
(Undergraduate Male Corridor)
Resident Advisor-Mosher/Jordan
(Undergraduate Male Corridor)
Advisory positions require Junior status or
above during the period of employment.

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cut a endorsement wtui aIurt (Continued from Page 1)
him politically,Pierce respond- K E N N E D Y DEFEAT-
ed, "I don't think it'll have any ED two anti-busing candidates
voter effect, but the lack of in Massachusetts' Democratic
money is definitely going to primary; Proxmire won against
hurt us." a write in candidate in Wiscon-
sin, and Humphrey defeated a
PIERCE also contended that token opponent who campaigned
Pursell might also have been little in Minnesota. Gerald
set back by the AFL-CIO deci- Brekke, won the Republican
Sion. primary in Minnesota and will
"I think three months ago, oppose Humphrey.I
Carl Pursell expected to get it In another Massachusetts!
(the endorsement)," s a i d race, Rep. Thomas O'Neill Jr.,I
Pierce "but now it turns out in line to be speaker of theC
I House claimed victory over a
he didn't - so it may be a little-known opponent.
more serious blow for him than And in Navada, Democratic
for us." Sen. Howard Cannon, chairman
Pursell received the AFL-CIO of the Senate Rules committee,
easily won renomination.
and United Auto Workers en- IN FINAL unofficial returns
dorsement in his 1974 state sen- in the Rhode Island contest for
ate campaign. He was not avail- the Senate seat being vacated
able for comment last night re- by Sen. John Pastore, auto
garding how he feels the AFL-361-vote edge overLorber he ta
CIO ecison wll afecthiswho has encountered difficulties!
campaign. bsincea derogatory remark ear-
MICHIGAN UNION
Billiards, Pinball, Bowling
22 tables, 20 machines, 7 lanes
OPEN: 11 o.m. Mon.-Sat.
1 p.m. Sundays
"WE HAVE THE PLACE AND THE GAMES"
Football Saturdays
CH ILDCA RE
21 -10 year olds
a planned program of fun activities include:
GAMES SNACKS
FILMS CRAFTS
1289 JEWETT
(close to Michigan Stadium)
769-4511 ANYTIME I

Tier this year about blacks. But
there were 3,111 absentee votes
still to be counted.
This is how the other races
stacked up on a day in which
there were primaries for state-
wide office in 12 states, where
a generally light turnout was
estimated at ranging from 17 to
33 per cent:
NEW HAMPSHIRE: Outspok-
en conservative Gov. Meldrim
Thomson ran away from mod-
erate Republican Gerard Zeiller
to win nomination for a third
term. On the Democratic side,
Harry Spanos, a former state
senate leader, was ahead in a
three-way race and declared
himself the victor. And in a
Republican Congressional pri-
mary, John Adams, an unem-
ployed 61-year-old taxi driver
who did little campaigning, held
alead over favored kdward
Hewson.
VERMONT: Gov. Thomas Sal-
mon won the Democratic Sen-
ate nomination over Ecott Skin-
ner, former director of a public
interest group. Salmon will face
Republican Sen. Robert Staf-
ford, who was nominated easily.
Ii.,t

Daiv Photo by SCOTT ECCKER
Ann Arbor street poet Allen Berg composes an original love poem for a customer on State St.
Berg, 27, says he will "humbly and gladly" accept donations for his work. Annemarie Schiavi
describes Allen's life and times on Page one.
MSA announ ces new

II

QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Must be a registered U. of M.
student on the Ann Arbor Campus in good academic stand-
ing during the period of employment. (2) Must have lived
in residence halls at University level for at least one year.
(3) Must have a 2.5 grade point average at time of appli-
cation. (4) Preference is given to applicants who do not
intend to carry heavy academic schedules and who do not
have rigorous outside commitments. (5) Proof of these
qualifications may be required.
Current staff and other applicants who have an applica-
tion on file must come to this office to update their
application form..
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS:
3:00 P.M., September 17, 1976
A NON-DISCRIMINATORY IRMATIVEj
ACTION EMPLO. ,-

NO MORE VIETNAMS!
-in South Africa
-in Latin America
-in Middle East
The b e s t way to pre-
vent f u t u r e criimnal
interventions is to force
our govt. to give
FULL
AMNESTY
TO RESISTORS
AND VICTIMS.
DEMONSTRATE
TODAY
5 p.m., Crisler Arena
SOUTH ENTRANCE
Pol. Adv., Paid for by
veterans for Peace
542 S. Dearborn, Chicago, Iii.

By LANI JORDAN
In its first meeting this term,
the Michigan Student Assem-
bly (MSA) clarifiednew^fund-
ing procedures to be used this
fall and reviewed progress
made over the summer months
in an unresolved lawsuit.
In a vote conducted last
spring, students passed a mea-
sure to continue MSA's volun-
tary funding using a new pro-
cedure. The choice of whether
or not a student wishes to sup-
port MSA through a 75 centj
charge on his or her tuition
assessment will now be made
by checking 'yes' or no' on' a
form included with the bill.
With the old method students
who chose not to fund MSA
were required to file a separate
form at Student Accounts of-
fice withdrawing their support.
MSA president Calvin Luker
related recent developments in
the two - year - old Schaper-

the disappearance of ;$41,000 of
funds from the now defunct Stu-
dent Government Council (SG
C). MSA replaced SGC when
it was disbanded last January.
In mid-July several of the
counts in the suit were dismiss-
ed after David Schaper and
William Jacobs, both former
SGC officers, were able to ac-
count for unrecorded spending.'
Four expenses, including ap-
proximately $2000 spent for a
concert which never material-
ized, remains unaccounted for
at this point.
Other business included the

introduction of MSA's two re-
cently hired attorneys, Paul
.Teich and Dianne Fowler, who
explained their duties and an-
nounced the publication of a
housing "self-help" booklet,
sponsored in part by MSA.
Mike Taylor, MSA represen-
tative toStudentsAAssociation
for Lower Tuition, a group in-
volving most of the Universi-
ties and colleges in the state, an-
nounced a state-wide class boy-
cott scheduled for October 13.
Due to sparse attendance
most of MSA's business was
postponed until a special meet-
ing scheduled for September 21.

voluntary funding plan

UAW members
begin auto strike

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ORI"T"IES uRsh a house.. ..
I Find a home.
Register for Rush:
CALL 663-4505
or FISHBOWL, Sept. 13-16-Noon-4 p.m.
MASS MEETING
TIurs., Sept. 16, 7:30 p.m.
third floor, Michigan League

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is
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"IM theresn
The reason you'll "it's the way I
)ve the J- ykeep the price
ethe Jolly TI prepar service for terrific food,
ozens fs as reasonable
elicious as possible.
reakfast nitely the/
inch and reason:
inner 4
ishes"
~/
r .f
.....
FAMILY RESTAURANT
Where we're all competing to please you.
Open 24 hours a day at
2080 West Stadium Blvd., Ann Arbor.

'S

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1977-78 MARSHALL-RH ODES-POWER-
LON DON EXCHANGE SCHOLARSHIPS
Nominations and applications for Senior Scholarships are now being
accepted. These scholarships support successful candidates for one or
more years of study in Great Britain. The programs include:
1) Marshall Scholarships (two years of study at any British
University, males and females).
2) Rhodes Scholarships (two years of study at Oxford, males
and females)...
3) Power Fellowship (two years at Magdalene College, Cam-
bridge, males only).,.
4) London Exchange Fellowship (one year, University Col-
lege, London, males and females).
Outstanding seniors and recent graduates are eligible and are encouraged to apply.
Faculty are encouraged to submit names of candidates as well. Please contact Sam
Wheelis, Director of the Office of Study Abroad and Senior Scholarships, International
Center, 603 E. Madison, between 12:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m.

1

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Jacobs lawsuit which involved (Continued from Page 1) week for a single, and $45 a
H 0 W E V E R, even during week for a married man," he
daylight hours the Ford plant added.
U of M will not be besieged by hostile The union strike fund was
workers. Only eight men at a set at 175 million dollars.
T A E KWON DO time will be allowed to carry THIS STRIKE is the fourth
signs in front of the two open in the industry since 1967, when
CLUB gates. Ford was shut down for 66
The Union ordered this limit days. Three years later a strike
DEMONSTRATION on picketers to avoid any un- at General Motors Corporation
necessary conflict with people lasted 67 days, but the 1973
TT E crossing the lines. strike against Chrysler Corpor-
"The more picketers you have ation lasted only nine days.
Central Campus there, the greater the chance of The last time the UAW agreed
I someone getting out of line," on a contract without a strike
Rec. Sports Bldg. said Leonard. was in 1964.
BUT IT seems unlikely that UNLIKE previous strike years
DANCE ROOM things will get out of hand since when only one or two issues
there is almost a feeling of remained unsettled, Ford and
i7;00 p.m. goodwill at the local. the anion appeared sharply di-
"Most of the men are saying, vided in a number of areas.
Head Instructor 'Good, we need a few days va- The company has argued that
MASTER HWA CHONG cation,"' said Leonard. a costly settlement would event-
Still, there is no question that rally lead to higher car prices,
FOR INFO CALL: the strike will prove a hard- which could dampen sales and
shin on many of the workers. lead to more industry unem-
DON PETEREN994-49 12 "I HATE to see it for the ployment. Industry officials also
JOE LLOYD-665-8543 membership, because there's a note that the UAW historically
lot of younger men with fami- is the nation's contract trend-
ALL WELCOME lies." said Leonard. setter, so any settlement in De-
"The Union will provide $50 troit could affect labor costs in
a week for families, $40 a' other industries.
\ YU-M SCHOOL OF MUSIC Presents
ENRICHMENT & TALENT
s DEVELOPMENT COURSES
open to all adults who are interested in developing
ha new-found talent or expanding their knowledge
and skills in the world of music .
GUITAR
Beginning Folk Guitar Intermediate Folk Guitar
Beginning Classical Guitar Intermediate Classical Guitar
Introducton to Blues & Rock Guitar
ENRICHMENT
Introduction to Music Theory Introduction to the Classic
for the uninitiated who wish to gain American Popular Song:
an appreciation and understanding of History & Practice-
music fundamentals
Intrducton t Elctroic Msicexploring the historical traditions and
Introduction to Electronic Music performing s t y 1 e s of songs from
for t h o s e who've wondered what pering's tyass ofrsongs frm
makes a synthesizer synthesize America's classical period - a must
Intrduction to Music Composition for every musical theater buff or per-
for those who've always wanted to former
write music but weren't sure how to
go about it
I-~L~AI ~ - ii ~ kA L E

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HUMORISTS ARTISTS BUSINESS PEOPLE PHOTOGRAPHERS
ALL INTERESTED STUDENTS
TH E
NEW GARGOYLE
THE NATION'S LARGEST AND FASTEST GROWING
COLLEGE HUMOR MAGAZINE
Announces
An Open Organizational Meeting

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