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September 15, 1976 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, September 1 i, '197&

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

SERVING SIX TO TWENTY:
Ex-Watergate burglar Liddy

HEW

predicts decline

fights for
DANBURY, Conn. (4P -- G.
Gordon Liddy, Watergate bur-
glar anq onetime counsel to
former President Richard Nix-
on's re-election committee, is
now fighting for inmates' rights
in the federal prison here.
Sentenced to the federal
penitentiary for his role in the
Watergate scandal, he works
as a clerk in the prison power
plant and wages war against
prison regulations that he says
violate prisoners' rights.
LIDDY, who organized the
Watergate break-in team for the
June 1972 burglary of Demo-
cratic national headquarters in
Washington, is serving six to
20 years. He Is not eligible for
parole consideration until 1981.
Last February, he was placed
in one; of several small, locked
cells reserved for disciplining
Danbury Federal Correctional
Institution inmates. He was ac-'
cused of being insolent to a
guard but later was cleared
during an administrative hear-
ing.
On Aug. 19, Liddy represent-'
ed himself and other inmates in
U. S. District Court in Hartford,
where he complained that pris-
oners placed in "administra-
tive detention" were not given
adequateexplanation for the
disciplinary action against
them.

risoner
HE ALSO argued that privi-
leged mail, which can be open-
ed only in the presence of the
inmate to whom it is addressed,
is being opened outside the in-
mate addressee's presence..
U. S. District Court Judge
Jon Newman ruled last April
that prisoners put in detention
must be given written explan-
ation. At the same time, New-
man designated more categor-
ies of mail as "privileged."
Liddy's complaints about al-
leged violations of those deci-
sions are under consideration
by Newman, and Danbury
Warden George Wilkinson re-
fuses to discuss them.
HE SAYS, however, that any
possible violations are the re-
sult of "human errors," not
policy decisions. He also notes
that Liddy spends "a lot of time
at the law library."
Liddy has asked Newman to
hold Wilkinson in contempt for
the alleged violations at Dan-
bury and suggested that:
-Prisoners whose rights have
been violated be compensated
by shortened sentences. New-
man had originally suggested
such a remedy during the hear-
ing in April because "time is
the principal currency" in a
prison.
-A Yale University faculty
member monitor compliance of

ri hts
privileged mail and administra-
tive detention regulations and
issue monthly reports.
-The prison's mail room be
attended by two clerks rather
than one. Newman said testi-
mony indicated to him that
there was such a volume of
mail at the prison that some
mistakes were inevitable.
Liddy refused, under a grant
of immunity, to answer a Wat-
ergate grand jury's questions,
and he still refuses to be inter-
viewed.
"MY DECISION, taken four
years ago, not to discuss Water-
gate matters, is not under re-
view," he wrote in response to
a request by The Associated
Press for an interview.
During a tour of the Danbury
prison in August, a reporter
saw Liddy at his desk in a small
office at the power plant, where:
he keeps records. He dresses
in a white T-shirt and khaki,
pants, his broad moustache and
hair neatly trimmed.
Liddy lives in a dormitory,,
where 80 men sleep in bunk'
beds. The prison houses about
745 offenders, about half of,
them sentenced on drug-related
charges. He has not been grant-
ed a space in the preferential
housing section, a set ofsmall
single ceps set aside for the
most cooperative prisoners.

in fall school enrollment

WASHINGTON (/P) - The na-
tion's college and school en-
rollments this fall are expect-
ed to decline slightly from last
year's historic high of 60.2 mil-
lion students because of the low
birth rate, according to the
government's annual "Back to
School" report released yester-
day.
The forecast calls for about
100,000 fewerstudents, the first
drop since World War II when
colleges were drained by young
men entering military service
and young women taking over
their civilian jobs.
TOTAL EDUCATION expen-
ditures in the 1976-77 school
year,however, are expected to
top $13 billion, anvincreaseof
about $10 billion over the pre-
vious year, and the number of
classroom teachers and other
instructional staff members is
expected to rise slightly to al-
most 3.2 million persons.
The Department of Health,
Education and Welfare (HEW),
which prepares the annual re-
port, said the enrollment de-
cline can be expected to con-
tinue for several years. Ele-
mentary school enrollments
have been dropping slowly but
steadily since 1970, secondary
school enrollments will peak
this year, and college and uni-
versity enrollments should be-
gin falling around 1983 or 1984,
HEW sami
The forecasts are somewhat
less than precise, however. Last
OVER 3/4 MILLION G.I.S
W H O GOT LESS-THAN-
HONORABLEEDISCHARGES
IN THE VIETNAM ERA,
THE VAST MAJORITY
WITHOUT TRIAL, HAVENA
LIF E SENTENCE OF NO
VETS' BENEFITS & NO
DECENT J O B S WITHOUT
}FULL AMNESTY
DEMONSTRATE
TODAY
CRISLER ARENA, 5 P.M.
SOUTH ENTRANCE
Poi. Adv., Paid for by
Veterans for Peace
542 S. Dearborn, Chicago, i11.

year, HEW predicted a total
nationwide enrollment of 58.9
million studetts but undershot
the mark by about 1.3 million
because of higher - than - an-
ticipated private school figures
and a larger number of stu-
dents who went to college or
graduate schooltduring the tight
job market.
HEW OFFICIALS noted that
the birth rate has been falling
for 10 years. It showed its big-
gest drop from 1970 to 1975,
when it fell from 18.3 to 14.8
for each 1,000 persons in the
country.
Education will be the primary
activity of 63.6 million young-
sters and adults this fall, or

aboul one out of every 10 Amer-
icans, and education expendi-
tures will capture about 8 per
cent of the GrossuNational Pro-
duct -- the value of the na-
tion's goods and services.
Enrollments are forecast to
decline more than 1 per cent,
to 34.2 million youngsters, in
public and private elementary
schools, increase less than 1
per cent to 15.8 million students
in high schools, and jump 4
per cent to 10.1 million in col-
leges and universities.
HEW said high schools will
graduate more than 3.1 million
seniors next spring, about the
same as a year ago.

AUDITIONS
University Guest Artist Series
Production of
Oh, What a Lovely War
FRI., SEPT. 17, 7:30-11:00,
SAT., SEPT. 18, 10-12; 2-5
2518 FRIEZE BUILDING
University Showcase
Production of the Comedy
Man of Mode'
FRI., SEPT. 17, 7:30-1 1:00,
SAT., SEPT. 18, 10-12; 2-5
2528 FRIEZE BUILDING

THE COLLEGE OF LSA ANNOUNCES
THE FOLLOWING SPECIAL COURSES FOR THE FALL TERM
Res. Coil. 412-A Reconciliation of Man and Nature
(2 cr-1 weeks)

Sec. 001

(Disc)

TTh 11

Room 124 E. Quad

Sir E. Ashby

'76-'77 Michigan Yearbook
MAS.EEI NG
THURSDAY NIGHT, Sept. 16th at 7:00
If you are interested in:

Sir Eric Ashby, distingushed British botanist and Fellow in the Royal Society and Royal Institute of
Chemists, holds the Walgreen Professorship in this College during this F a I I term. His seven-week
course, which will deal with political and ethical questions concerning the attitude of man and govern-
ments toward the environment is open to all LSA students
Univ. CourSe 101-Introduction to the University (4 cr)

Sec. 001
Sec. 002

(Disc)
(Lec)

MTh 4 4007 AH
T 2-4 MLB, Aud 4

Prof. Wm. Frankena
Prof. E. Abdel-Massih

*STUDENT SELECTING SEC. 002 MUST ALSO ELECT ONE OF THE
FOLLOWING DISCUSSION SECTIONS:

Sec. 003
Sec. 004
Sec. 005
Sec. 006

Disc. WF 1
Disc. MF 10
Disc. MW 3
Disc. WF 1

3540 FB
2450 MH
3020 FB
2046 FB

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MARKETING MANAGEMENT

ART
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COPY WRITING
SPORTS

As a result of recommendations of the Commission on Graduation Requirements, the new introduc-
tion to the University course is being initiated this Fall term to give students the opportunity to ex-
plore the values, aims, and means of liberal education with some special attention to the resources
and programs of the University of Michigan. Such a course may be useful to students developing per-
sonal educational goals and is open to freshmanand sophomores in LSA.

please come to the mass meeting for new and old staff
members for the 1977 Michiganensian-the official all-
campus student run, student produced year-in-review. And
decide what will be included in YOUR student yearbook. For
more information, call 764-0561.
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG.-420 Maynard (next to SAB)

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