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January 19, 1977 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1977-01-19

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Wednesday, January 1", 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, January 1% 1977 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

India relaxes
politfical rule
NEW DELHI, India (AP)-Prime Minister Indira Gandhi,
declaring her "unshakable faith in the power of the people,"
announced yesterday that parliamentary elections would take
place in March as part of a major relaxation of her 19-month-
old emergency rule.
"Let us go to the polls with the resolve to reaffirm the
power of the people and to uphold the fair name of India
as a land committed to the path of reconciliation, peace and
progress," Gandhi said in an eight-minute national broadcast.
THE ELECTIONS WILL BE THE FIRST since Gandhi
proclaimed a state of emergency June 26, 1975 following her
conviction on election fraud charges. She suspended civil lib-
erties, jailed opposition leaders and imposed press censorship,
and said the measures were needed to quell a "threat to
internal stability."
The governmept previously had won parliament's approval
to postpone elections until March 1978. They were originally
set for last March at the end of the regular five-year term
of the lower house of parliament.
Gandhi's surprise announcement came three hours after
the government freed her arch political foe, former Deputy
Prime Minister Morarji Desai, and L. K. Advani, leader of
the right-wing Hindui Nationalist Jana Sangh party. About a
dozen parliamentarians are still in jail, including Socialist leader
Raj Narain, sources said.
THE 80-YEAR-OLD DESAI, considered the most prominent
opposition politician in the country, had been imprisoned since
the emergency began. He said after Gandhi's broadcast that
the relatively short time left until the election "puts a hard-
ship on the opposition."
"But I am sure this sudden declaration of an election
will benefit not the prime minister but the nation, which is
the only important thing," Desai said.. "It is a test for the
people. I hope it will be a fair election."
In her speech, given first in Hindi and then in English,
Gandhi pledged that the emergency would be relaxed "to
permit all legitimate activity necessary for recognized parties
to put forth their points of view before the people."
THE PRIME MINISTER SAID there already had been a
"gradual easing" of emergency restrictions. She cited the re-
laxation of densorship on the domestic press and the release
of opposition leaders and members.
,t the same time, the 59-year-old prime minister warned
that she would not tolerate any disruption.
"May I remind you that the emergency was proclaimed
because the nation was far from normal," she said. "Now
that it is being nursed to health, we must ensure that there
is no relapse."
THE PRIME MINISTER'S BROADCAST served, in effect,
as her first campaign speech on behalf of the ruling Con-
gress party.
Gandhi boasted of an improved economy, containment of
rampaging inflation, increased industrial production, record food
grain stocks, and new social programs to eliminate dowries and
control population, all of which she linked to her emergency
rule.
"In spite of criticism, there is a new respect for our
country abroad," she said.
OPPOSITION SOURCES SAID THEY WOULD attack not
only Gandhi's decision to impose the emergency but measures
adopted by parliament since then, including a constitutional
amendment increasing executive branch powers and a press
censorship bill.
Gandhi proclaimed the emergency two weeks after she was
found guilty of misusing the services of government officials
in her own parliamentary election campaign in 1971. Major
opposition parties demanded her resignation, but the supreme
court overturned her conviction in November 1975 after the
laws under which she was found guilty were rewritten retro-
actively.
Asoka Mehta, president of an opposition Congress party,
said the election announcement would spur a merger, now set
for early March, of major non-Communist opposition parties
into a single party. In past elections, the Congress won most
of its seats through pluralities while opposition parties split
the majority of votes in nearly all districts.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
' "a. ''?{0f 6i :4 .R+ .fi"' ."iM'''{, ^'" o:n!+a+',:{ , E t+'k;:.esa y'{" ;':v "Y, '':_iis :

Rockefeller bids farewell

WASHINGTON (AP) - Vice
President Nelson Rockefeller
bade farewell to the Senate yes-
terday, saying he never wanted
his job but took it to help out'
during the Watergate turmoil.
"I came to'this post, to which
I had never -aspired and had,
indeed foresworn,' because of
the constitutional crisis facing
the country," he said.
"AS I LEAVE this office, I
share with you and a grateful
nation the profound satisfaction
that ourtcountry has returned
secure to its regular elective
procedures of representative,
government."
Rockefeller, 68, who succeed-I
ed Gerald Ford as vice presi-
dent when Richard Nixon re-
signed as president, declared
that "the ship of state is on
course again and well prepared
for the new captain and crew."
Sitting in the presiding offi-
cer's chair, Rockefeller told an
attentive Senate audience: "For
me, these past twoaunusual
years, in all candor, cannot be
said to have sorely tried either
my talents or my stamina."
HE DREW LAUGHTER when
he said, "I bequeath to ny suc-
cessor two helpful mottos of this
office of higfi calling. First,
'They also serve who merely sit
and wait; and second, 'Wait
and want not.' ",
Although Rockefeller's consti-
ttional role as vice president
is to preside over' the Senate,
he cannot speak to the Senate

unless invited to do so. Suchl
an invitation was extended by
the Senate by an unanimous
vote.
Rockefeller has said he now
plans to withdraw from active
involvement in the Republican
party.
A HALF-FILLED SENATE,
with mostly Republicans pre-
sent, gave the vice president
a one-minute standing ovation,
and then senators lauded his
record.
Senate Democratic Leader
Robert Byrd said Rockefeller
gave "genuine stability to the
country when stability was des-
perately needed."
Senate Republican Leader
1

Howard Baker said "few of our
nation's leaders have had the
difficulty of coming to office at
such trying times."
SEN. JACOB JAVITS, (R-N.Y.)
called the four-term New York
governor a "spirited man" who
has a productive life ahead of
him.
"We are by no means laying
him to rest today," he said.
Sen. Charles Percy, (R-Ill.)
said Rockefeller "spoke out for
what he believed in" and "gave
of himself to help us all."
When Percy spoke beyond his
five-minute limit, Rockefeller
performed one of his last duties
by firmly interrupting him, tell-
ing he had exceeded his time.

AP Photo
A new slant
The leaning tower has nothing on these tilting mailboxes in Allegan, Michigan. Officials
speculate that a snowplow shifted the slant of the mailboxes.
FUEL SHORTAGE ACUTE:
Dayton shuts don

Grad Coffee, Break
for Grad Students and Professional Staff
WEDNESDAYS
4:00--6: 00 p.m.
Wesley-,Lounge
of Wesley Foundation
602 E. Huron at State
(across from Campus Inn)
668-6881
PIRGIM thanks those who have supported its
public interest work.
For those who wish not to fund, PIRGIM announms a
Pirgim Fee Cancellation

I

DAYTON, Ohio UP) - Winter either natural gas or electric- said Donald Speyer, director
at its worst has nearly trans- ity, to keep businesses warm of community relations for
formed this city of 241,000 into and their ovens and furnaces DP&L. "We had many calls
a ghost town. Its residents, going and at the same time from customers who were
stung by the lowest tempera- leave enough to heat homes. afraid that the town would be!
tures in the city's history, also With Monday's record low blacked out and without heat."
have had to cope with elec- temperature, Dayton Power & At the same time demand
tricity and natural gas short- Light Co. - already faced with for electricity has been climb-
ages. a natural gas shortage - de- ing, DP&L has been unable
The center of town was near- clared its second emergency in to obtain fresh deliveries of
ly deserted Monday and Tues- two days. coal for its generators because,
day since businesses and indus- d ice on the Ohio River has
tr htdw ytesoe On Sunday, DP&L had realiz-
try shut down by the score it had a gas crisis because blocked coal barges, forcing
to conserve critically short e hda ak the utility to dip into its stock-
electricity .and natural gas. of the high demani and asked-piles.
its 21,000 commercial and ,n-
"IT'S KIND OF eerie real-! dustrial customers to close on -
"sidyearoFd tie-Monday so the limited gas sup-
ly," said 18-year-old Matt Mine- ply could be used for homes.
hart as he looked around a +
nearly empty shopping mall. MANY CLOSED voluntarily
"It feels like you're the only on Monday and some remained0
one left in town or something closed Tuesday. But DP&L
. . . But in a way it's kind of said Tuesday it would cut gas
neat. You don't have to fight deliveries to businesses and in-; Join us WEDNE
the crowd." distry to 50 per cent of their when the U-M J
In addition, since the cold 1972 allocations, used by gas
snap began, the crime rate has companies as a base level when brings you anoth
dropped. "Crimes of violence they began restricting deliver-!
are way down," said police ies in 1973. Earlier in the win-
officer J. P. Moore. "It's kind ter, they were cut to 65 per
tend to noncriminal services." On Monday, an electricity; Popular Mix
Moore said police have been emergency was declared be- Cheese and
surprised that being snow- cause of the demand for heat
bound with the wife,i husband and customers were urged to Everyone i
and kids has not led to more conserve energy. Within a 4:30
domestic quarrels. short time, consumption drop- 1429 H IL
"USUALLY ON any three ped by 8 per cent . and the
days that the family is together, utility was able to meet needs
there are bound to be more do- without using more drastic -
mestic problems," Moore said. measures.
"That hasn't been the case in "People were very concern-
this cold weather situation." ed about the possibility thatS
S"I guess with trying to keep we would have to begin alter- S I
warm and to start the car, peo- nate shutting off of distribut-
ple have got other things to ing lines for short periods," 'es! Any Interested Stu
worry about besides getting into - ~-~~--sit on the following com
mischief." nn iu nmu 1101 AU 1 STUD NT RELA

If you are interest-
or writing feature
stories a b o u t the
drama. dance.film
. arts: Cotact Art
Michigan Dally.

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e. ANY time this term.

S

TG)

ESDAY, JAN. 19
ewish community
er
PPY HOUR
ed Drinks 50c
snacks-free
s Welcome
-- 6:30
LL STREET

f

I

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N IT!

dent may
nmittees:
TIMO

(We hope, of course, you will want to support your environ-
mental, consumer and housing activities with a $1.50 fee).
RUSH
FRATERNITY
Open House
ja.23-29
700 .oxford
AT HILL
7613127
UNIVE.RSr~O OFMICHIGAN

~III

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
Wednesday, January 19, 1977
DAY CALENDAR
Psychiatry: Michael Goldstein, U
of Calif., "Studies of Adolescents
and Their Families at Risk for
Schizophrenia and Other Forms of
Early Adult Psychopathology," CPH
Aud., 9:30 a.m.
ISMRRD: William M. Cruickshank,
"Structure: Program and Teaching
Materials I," 130 S. First, 3-5 p.m.
Ind./Op. Eng.: J. M. Moore, Exxon
Corp., "Data Reconciliation - An
Essential Element for Improving
Chemical Plant Operational Perform-
ance," 229 W.E., 4:00 p.m.
Statistics: Prof. Robert Berk, Rut-
gers U., An Asymptotically Optimal

Sequential Test, 3227 Angell Hall,
4:00 p.m.
Physics/Astronomy: V. W. Hughes,
Yale U., "Parity Experiment with
e-p Scattering at SLAC," P and A.
Colloquim Rm., 4:00 p.m.
GENERAL NOTICES
The Center for Continuing Edu-
cation of Women invites women and
men interested in taking graduate
and professional school admission
test to The Exam Taking Process,
Wednesday, January 26, 7:30 p.m.
Women anticipate taking the GRE,
LSAT, GMAT, after an educational
interruption especially welcome.
Women who have taken admission
exams talk about their . strategies
for refreshing student skills, and
help with practical tips to cope
with doubts and take exams. A bib-
liography of study guides and ref-
erence materials will be available.
The Exam Taking Process in Rm.
B 115, Modern Language Bldg., 8
Thayer. Info about this and tther
CEW activities call or visit CEW
center, 328-330 Thompson, 763-1353,
open weekdays 8:30-5:00 p.m.

Most schools in the area clos-
ed because of the cold - a re-
cord 21 below zero on Mon-
day - and the fuel shortages
and a school system in neigh-
boring Mechanicsburg has al-
ready announced it will stay
shut for the rest of the month.
THE PROBLEM is simply
there is not enough energy,

UK. PAUL U. UNLAN
OPTOMETRIST
Eye Examinations
Full Contact Lens Service
Cold Sterlizotion for
Soft Lenses
545 CHURCH ST.
769-1222

BUDGET PRIORITIES
UNIVERSITY CELLAR BOARD
UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
BUDGET STEERING COMMITTEE
ELECTIONS DIRECTOR
Michigan Student Assembly Committees:
TREASURER
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS BOARD
PERSONAL COMMITTEE
INSURANCE COMMITTEE
APPLICATIONS IN MICHIGAN STUDENT ASSEMBLY
OFFICE, ROOM 3909 MICHIGAN UNION
APPLICATION DEADLINE 5:00 P.M.
THURSDAY, JAN. 20, 1977

11

ACU-1 Tournament
for MEN and WOMEN

BOWLING
SAT. JAN. 22
10 a.m.

POCKET
BILLIARDS
SAT. and SUN.
Jan. 22-23-12 p.m.

I's

I F

For More Information Call: 763-3241

1

_____..._ ._._ _. . _._ 4____.-

MICHIGAN UNION

I

a

Fraternity Coordinating Council

I

announces

T H UR Mass Meetin
THURSDAY JANUARY20

LSH
'7
7:30

The Navy Nurse Corps is where it's
happening. Ycu'It find professional
challenges every day as you gain valuable
experience in general nursing practice.
'Discover the broadened professional scope
of a Nurse Practitioner. Participate in
programs in Obstetrics/Gynecology,
Pediatric Nursing or your own specialty.
Perhaps even work toward your Master's
degree, if you are qualified.
Subject to the needs of the Navy, you'll
practice in different places, and earn 30
days of paid vacation yearly. And you'll
enjoy all the prestige and privileges of a
Naval officer. It's an exciting life-style unlike
anything you've known before - and it can

s a mw s %W now 0

y s w i - -

.. .. ......

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