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April 19, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-04-19

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, April 19, 1977

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesdoy, April 19, 1977

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"A movie notto be missed."
Robert Altman s 3 Women'issu chastimulating
achievement in cinematic art thatitmakesone
rethink the whole aestheticof m onpictures.
Thereissomethigsoutterlyunusual about
'3 Women'that its like may nevermaterialize again."
Andrmu&ris--Vlagd6 be
a. X91f7 7 7: , t4M e & 3 u
RESERVED SEATS ARE $3.50, $2.50, $1.50 AND ARE AVAILABLE AT
UAC TICKET CENTRAL I N THE MICHIGAN UNION
PLEASE NOTE. There is no admission charge for the screening of 3 WOMEN. The ticket prices
are for Robert Altman's appearance only. Your reserved seat in Hill for the lecture entitles you to
the invitational screening of the film.

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Seniors look baek at,

'U'

(Continued from Page 1)
educational experience if
let yourself."

you

ASKED IF HE has learned
much in the past four years, an
E n g l i s h concentrator said:
"Hell, yes, but about one-third
was in class."
In reflecting on their educa-
tional experiences, several sen-
iors complained about faculty.
Only half of the sampling said
they were able to have sufficient
contact with professors, and
most did not find the meetings
beneficial.
"Most times they were busy
and one had to make appoint-
ments greater than a week in
advance," a physical therapy
senior commented. "1 therefore
relied upon my own resources."
"IF YOU FIND them, they
are always running soff to check

:

on their research project," said
a zoology major.
"Most did not want to waste
their time talking with under-
grads," said one history major.
"Opportunities seemed there,
but most professors seemed re-
luctant," added a p o l i t i c a l
science concentrator.
WHILE FREQUENT contact
with TFs is not difficult, it is
not very fruitful either, accord-
ing to virtually every respon-
dent.
"I could have enough contact
with TFs, but I was disappoint-
ed in their quality of teaching,"'
one zoology major said.
"I felt the TFs in many cases
were inadequately prepared to
teach the courses they were
assigned to," said a history sen-
ior. "In the sciences, they fre-
quently teach labs dealing with
material outside their field," he
added.,
THE SENIORS -say contact
with faculty depends on student
initiative:
"One of the failings of this
University is that you have to
push and be aggressive gener-
ally to get attention," said a
theater major. "It bothers me
when I-think of people who ate
shy or are in large, impersonal
departments. What's happening
to them? Most people are afraid
to talk, and it is the role of a
good teacher to banish that
fear and get people thinking
and talking."
Most respondents considered
University academic counseling'
services inadequate. Some men-,

tioned individual concentration
advisers they had depended on
for guidance, while others said
they made it through college
without advice.
"I SUPPOSE they are helpful
in giving information, but I
found them discouraging at
times. They are quick. to. say,
'This is how it's done,' " said a
psychology and philosophy ma-
jor.
"All they tell you is to read
the catalogue," complained one
chemistry concentrator, while a
political science major termed
academic counseling "probably
one of the worst features of the
University."
"I was misled on two occa-
sions and almost didn't graduate
because of it. I usually knew
more than they did," one history
senior concluded.
SENIOR YEAR was most
popular, largely because re-
spondents claimed to have had
greater freedom in course se-
lection.
"I was able to take exactly
what I wanted because all the
requirements were out of the
w y," said a political science
ncentrator.
"I finally got it into my head
that I have rights around here,"
,added an English major.
SOPHOMORE and j u n i o r
years were favored by. a few
respondents for varied reasons.
No one cited freshman year as
being his/her most memorable.
"Sophomore year was my
best because I was over my
freshman disappointments and

confusion, but not took sick of
the University yet," said a his-
tory major.
"Junior year was my best be-
cause I met a few nice girls,"
claimed a male history senior.
MOST SENIORS said they
came to the University beCAuse
of its academic reputation or
because it was "the best in-state
school." About half said that if
they had it to do over,, they
would have gone about their
four years at the University in
the same way. The remaining
responses varied from students
saying they would have changed
their major to claiming they
would not have come to the Uni-
versity at all.
"I would have goner to a small-
er school with less academic
pressure but hopefully the same
quality of education," said one
microbiology concentrator.
A political science major said
he would, have "attended a
smaller college and gotten a
four-point and then gone here."
ONE RESPONDENT said he
"would have gotten more in-
volved in s o c i a 1 functions,"
while another said he "would
have worked much harder."
"I wish I'd had more contact
with older students who weren't
uptight about studying and
grades," said a German and
philosophy senior.
The San Francisco earth-
quake and fire of 1906 in which
452 people lost their lives was
the largest earthquake disaster
in the United States.

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