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April 17, 1977 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1977-04-17

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Sunday, April 17, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Sunday, April 17, 1977 THE MiCHIGAN DAILY

DAILY DIGEST

APRIL 17, 1977

From Wire Service Reports
International
Rebels battle
in Zaire
KINSHAST, Zaire - Moroc-
can troops have made their first
move against an army of seces-
sionist rebels in Zaire's Shaba
Province, reinforcing the outer
defense line for the copper-min-
ing center of Kolwezi, it was
reported yesterday.
The rebels were setting up a
civilian administration and is-
suing identity cards for the
"Democratic Republic of the
Congo" in the one-third of the
province they control, civilian
sources reported. The seces-
sionists, who mounted their in-
vasion from neighboring Angola,
are believed to number 2,000.
SOME 400 Moroccan soldiers,
part of a contingent of 1,500
sent to aid the embattled gov-
ernmentof Zairean President
Mobutu Sese Seko, advanced 25
miles northwest from their base
at Kolwezi to back up govern-
ment troops near Kanzenze, re-
porters returning from the area
said.
The secessionists clashed with
government forces this past
week a few miles west of Kan-
zenze, a village of 2,000 with a
clinic and mission. The fight-
ing there and at two villages
farther to the northwest was
the first reported in two weeks.
The rebels, who invaded the
province March 8, are led by
Lunda tribesmembers and for-
mer Katangan gendarmes who
were driven into Angola in the
1960s after unsuccessful at-
tempts to win independence for
Katanga.
New talks
in Rhodesia?
SALISBURY, Rhodesia -
British Foreign Secretary David
Owen and Rhodesion Prime
Minister Ian Smith were to con-
fer yesterday on a new U.S.-
British effort to revive talks
paving the way for black major-
ity rule in Rhodesia.
Aides say Owen already had
won support for his peace mis-
sion from the leaders of key
black states in southern Africa.
He was seeking to persuade
Smith, leader of this breakaway
British colony's white minority
government, to resume meet-
ings with black nationalist lead-
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 153
Sunday, April 17, 1977
Is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a iiy Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept, thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Daily Official Bulletin
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
- Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
Sunday, April 17, 1977
DAY CALENDAR
WUOM: Options in Education:
"Higher Education, Pt. 2," 1 p.m.

.11

'ers.
Owen also has support for his
mission from South African
Prime Minister John Vorster,
whose militarily and economic-
ally powerful, white-ruled coun-
try has propped up Rhodesia
since Smith broke with Britain.
in 1965.
The negotiations would beI
aimed at rewriting the constitu-
tion as a preliminary step to-
ward a transfer of power to
Rhodesia's 6.4 million blacks
next year.
National
Remembering
a flood...
LOBATA, W. Va. - The gov-
ernment promised help for the
hundreds of families left home-
less by floods two weeks ago,
but Percy Thomas and some of
his neighbors are still sleeping
under the stars.
"We came up here the night
of the flood," the 63-year-old dis-
abled coal miner ssaid. "Let's
see, that was the fourth wasn't
it? You kinda lose track of time
up here."
THE RED CROSS estimates
the flooding destroyed 2,700
homes in West Virginia, Ken-
tucky, Virginia and Tennessee.
Another 7,200 homes sustained
mapor damage.
Thomas and 15 of his neigh-
bors have built canvas - cover-
ed shelters on a coal company
access road on the hill above
their ruined homes while they
wait for the federal government
to bring in emergency housing.
"I signed up for a mobile
home today," Thomas said.
"They told me I could have it
for a year, rent free, and then
could buy it if I wanted to."
"BUT, God only knows how
long it will be before we get

that mobile home. They've got
to clear away our wrecked
houses first."
Like most of the shattered
houses at Lobata - some 12'
miles'south of Williamson along
Tug Fork on the West Virginia-
Kentucky border -- his home
was marked with a large, red
Xf
"They've all been condemn-
ed," he said. "I've lived in that
house since 1929 . . . My wife
and I raised six kids in that
house.'"
Justice Dep't.
vs. the FBI
WASHINGTON - Like boxers
dancing around each other, the
Justice Department and the
FBI are sparring over the is-
sue of prosecuting FBI men for
illegal burglaries, wiretaps, and
mail opening operations. FBI
Director Clarence Kelley, in his
first known effort to influence
the department's decision, has
publicly asked Atty. Gen. Grif-
fin Bell to reconsider the indict-
ment of former supervisor John
Kearney and the charges plan-
ned against other bureau men.
Based on interviews with more
than a dozen lawyers and other
officials in and out of the gov-
ernment who have followed the
proceedings closely, these cour-
ses of action seem open to Bell:
0 Ask the court to dismiss
Kearney's indictment returned
April 7, bring no other charges,
and declare the investigation
closed.
0 Proceed with all of the
charges and let the question of
guilt or innocence be deter-
mined by juries and judges.
FBI officials and outside sup-
porters say this would destroy
bureau morale.
* Chart a middle course. Drop
the charges against Kearney
or allow him to plead "no con-
test" to a minor charge, forget

any other indictments, and
make all of the evidence pub-
lic.
0 Drop the whole matter in the
lap of a special prosecutor with
no ties to the department or the
bureau.
'Carter spares
w ater projects
WASHINGTON - President
Carter is recommending at
leastpartial funding for almost
half the water projects he
threatened to scrap. But Car-
ter's top political adviser, Ham-
ilton Jordan, says if he were
president he wouldn't have
threatened any of them in the
first place.
"You could ask him to do the
water projects thing over 10
different times, and he'd do itE
the same way every time," Jor-
dan said.
After eight weeks of bitter
fighting with Congress over the
30 dams and waterways, Carter
decided Friday to recommend
full funding in fiscal 1978 for
eight, partial funding for five,

continued review for two and
no funding for 15.
Carter's decisions defused
some of the anger among mem-
bers of Congress who want the
projects for their home states
and whose support Carter needs
for his own programs. But
some bitterness remained.
Members whose projects Carter
has rejected threatened to ov-
erride his recommendations.
"The formal decision will be
made by Congress, not the ad-
ministration," declared Sen.
George McGovern, (D-S.D.)
whose Oahe Irrigation Project
was rejected.
State
VA case gets
federal ruling
DETROIT - A federal judge
has ruled prosecutors may
have a handwriting expert ex-
amine a note reportedly refut-
ing evidence against two Fili-
pino nurses accused of the 1975

murders of two Ann Arbor Vet-
erans Administration hospital
patients.
Prosecutors contend that Leo-
nora Perez and Filipina Narcis-
co injected patients with a pow-
erful muscle relaxant that
caused breathing failures.
U. S. District Judge Philip
Pratt ruled Friday that prose-
cutors may have a handwriting
expert examine a note alleged-
ly written by a patient at the
hospital who suffered a breath-
ing failure.
Federal prosecutors have
argued that the nurses may
have forged the note to refute
evidence the patient gave to the
FBI.
Pratt said the note, currently
held by defense attorneys, will
have to be given to the prose-
cutors.

A CONCERT BY
. :JULIET
Dramatic Lyric Soprano
Sunday, April 17, 8 p.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
...-- - - -.- -.---.- -............... ... .... ...... .... -
I Ms. King has just returned from her fourth European
I tour. She has given sixty-seven concerts in Sweden,
I and a number in Ireland, Scotland and England,
I where she performed at Westminster Abbey. She has
I charmed a great variety of audiences in the U.S.
I with her repertoire of classical and sacred music.
Sponsors: Ecumenical Campus Center
First Presbyterian Church

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