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January 16, 1977 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-01-16

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Page Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, January 16, 1977

ALL YOU CAN EAT!
Sunday Special Noon 'til 9 P.M.
BAKED CHICKEN
DINNER INCLUDES:
* Tender Baked Chicken
*, Sage Dressing
" Creamy Mashed Potatoes
" Large Pretzel Bell Salad with Choice of Dressing
* Steaming Hot Basket of Russian Rye Bread

I

-Mop"

SUNDAY MAGAZINE

LOOKING

THE WEEK IN REVIEW

I

$3.95 ADULT

CHILDREN Under 12-$1.75

MONDAY\ SPECIAL:
"Bar-B-Que Chicken"
All You Can Eat $3.95
The Pretzel Bell
Restaurant
SERVING DINNER 5 TO 10 P.M.
120 E. LIBERTY 761-1470
! F U DAILY AT 7:15 & 9: 15
7t F 0 SUN. AT 5:157:15 9:15
NOW SHOWING!
young Dracula has so much trouble with the
opposite sex that he's carrying around his
own stake looking for a guy with a hammer!
ANDY WARHOL'S

Death Wish
"SHE KEPT TALKING 'shoot
me, shoot me.' I turned
around, said 'the hell with it,'
and fired..."
So went Ricky Wayne Wil-
son's account of the moment
he slayed University freshwom-
an Jeannine Boukai, a woman
whom he earlier described as
a despondent, habitual drug,
user whose nagging death wish'
finally took the troubled Wil-

son over the brink of contract
murder.
Wilson pleaded guilty to sec-
ond degree murder last Thurs-
day in the Sept. 30 Arboretum
shooting. Circuit Court Judge
Patrick Conlin set sentencing
for Feb. 10. But the emotional
climax of Wilson's hearing was
his soliloquy to the court trac-
ing his first encounter with
Boukai atfasfriend's house on
Packard Rd. to the time when
he fired "two or three" bul-
lets into her body, then shot

ACU-I Tournament
for MEN and WOMEN

BOWLING
SAT. JAN. 22
10 a.m.

POCKET
BILLIARDS
SAT. and SUN.
Jan. 22-23--12 p.m.

I MICHIGAN UNION

om
m

ANN A DUCE) [ELM CC-4iI
A000A000000 0c000
0* @ @@@@S ee e @ .@@ . @..@@.OS. e *.* .**.e a
TONIGHT-Sunday, Jan. 16
TWO ARE GUILTY
(Andre Cayette, 1964) 7:00 only-.MLB 4
This movie is not really a whodunit: it's a who-didn't-do-it. Three
men are accused of kidnap and murder, but only two of them
committed the crime. The idea is to figure out, through back-
g yound investigation of the three personalities, which two are
guilty. Tony Perkins, Jean-Claude Brialy. French, dubbed.
"
BOUDU SAVED FROM DROWNING
(Jean Renoir, 1932) 9:15 only-MLB 4
An early sound film about a Paris bum, Michael Simon, who tries
(fakes?) suicide by lumping into the Seine, but is saved by a
charitable bookdealer. The bookdealer'ssbourgeois mares collide
with Boudu's down-and-out opportunism and the tension gives
rise to slapstick comedy. But the final boating scene on the river,
elebrating Boudu's marriage to a housemaid, has all the charm of
an Impressionist painting. "It succeeded beyond our hopes, the
public reaction being a mixture of laughter and fury. Boudu
foreshadowed the hippy movement long before it came into being
-indeed, he was the perfect hippy."-Jpan Renoir. French with
subtitles.
Plus: A PROPOS DE NICE
(JEAN VIGO, 1929)
Vigo and cameraman Boris Kaufman created a stunning docu-
mentary of the French city of Nice in the Russian Revolutionary
style. Rapid cutting of matched and contracted shots for aesthetic
and political intent give this film a startling level of energy. A
shock in 1929 for its Marxist satire of class differences,. Vigo's
film now takes on the quality of the fine poetry. A fine film,
important in the history of cinema. Silent.
$2.00-DOUBLE FEATURE
Tues.: THE DEVILS

she again because she told him
"I'm not dead."
Wilson's testimony recalled
the first time Boukai had ap-
proached him with her death
offer.
"She gave me $50. She said
to kill somebody. I said who.
She said me (herself). I said
'you gotta be kidding.' "
Wilson testified, however, that
he was vehemently opposed to
murdering Boukai, and had on'
several occasions attempted to
dissuade the 17-year-old Natur-
al Resources student from want-
ing to die.
But Wilson had troubles of his
own at the time, he told the
court. His life had been threat-
ened on the streets and he
wanted to leave Ann Arbor.
During their last walk togeth-
er in the Arb, Wilson recalled
Boukai giving him the "go-
ahead" to shoot her, saying that
she was prepared to die. At that
point Wilson told the court of
the actual shooting. He testi-
fied fleeing Ann Arbor the next
day with the $50 and his vic-
tim's motorcycle, whoe keys
Bouka had given himbefore
the shooting.
By pleading guilty to second
degree murder, a more serious
count of open murder was dis-
missed against Wilson. Nevpr-
theles, he still faces a maxi-
mum term of life imprison-
ment when he steps into court
for sentencing next .month.
Cabinet vs. Congress
gTHE MOANING and groaning
in various political circles
over President-elect Carter's
choices for Cabinet positions
died down last week, as the
appointees marched in and out
of Senate confirmation hearings
for what appeared to be possi-
ble across-the-board approval.
With three of the Carter team's
members already given the nod,
only CIA Director-designate
Theodore Sosensen appeared po-
tentially headed for rough sled-
ding.
The Week in Review was
compiled by Daily staff mem-
bers Jeff Ristine and Jay Levin.
if
you
see
news
happen
call
76DAL

Bergland
The week of confirmation
hearings began with the spot-
light on Carter's two women ap-
pointees, Patricia Roberts Har-
ris for the Department of Hons-
ing and Urban Development
and Juanita Kreps for the Com-
merce Dept. Harris found no
svmpathizer in Democratic Sen.
William Proxmire, who grum-
bled over her skimpy creden-
tials but nevertheless conceded
her confirmation was inevitable.
Agriculture Secretary nom-
inee Bob Bergland was the first
prospective administration offi-
cial to receive official approval,
when the Senate Agriculture
committee voted 9-0 in his fa-
vor after brief, friendly ques-
tioning Tuesday.
Cyrus Vance, named Secretary
of State, Harold Brown, the
choice for Secretary of Defense
and designated attorney gener-
al Griffin Bell also began their
confirmation hearings Tuesday,
Sand by week's end Vance and
Brown were approved by their
respective review panels.
Bell, under attack for his rec-
ord on civil rights, drew oppo-
sition from the NAACP and lib-
eral groups bt was expected
to win aproval without major
dfficulty. He insisted that while
he may have delayed enforce-
ment of civil rights legislation,
he "never defied the law." And
he tempted left-wingers by vow-
ing to fire FBI Director Clar-
ence Kelley "before too long"
and to refuse to authorize bug-
ging and wiretanping of Ameri-
can citizens without court war-
rants. Bell was also buoved by
a thumbs-up from former Wa-
tergate Secial Prosecutor Leon
Jaworski.
Thursday's hearings turned
the focus to Labor Secretary-
'4sguate Ray Marshall, who
itted he feels Carter should
-^1 more money to create
*'lrough public works pro-
than is currently planned
i1 the president-elect's econom-
ic program. Joseph .Califano,
the choice to head the Depart-
ment of Health, Education and
Welfare, sailed through his hear-
inas that day, making headlines
only with comments on federal
funding of abortions (he feels
the courts should settle the ar-
gument).
Formal Senate approval or
'those Cabinet members cleared
by the committees is expected
almost immediately after Car-
ter's Inauguration Thursday,
and if Sorensen survives chal-
lenges to his qualifications for
the CIA spot, the new presi
dent's team should soon begin

their uncertain stewardship un-
der Jimmy,Carter.
* 'I *
French Faux Pas
THE ARREST and subsequent
release last week of an al-
leged Palestinian terrorist
thought to have engineered the
1972 slaughter of Israeli ath-
letes at the Olympics has sent
a reverberation of criticism, pro-
tests and tension ranging the
globe from Tel Aviv to Detroit.
Just as soon as French -offi-
cials arrested Abu Daoud, Is-
rael and West Germany clam-
ored for the extradition of the
suspect to their countries for
court proceedings. However,
French officials last Tuesday
yielded instead to Arab protests
-and the fear of diminished oil
supply from Arab nations-and
flew Daoud to freedom in Al-
geria.
Although the French govern-
ment cited technical reasoning-
for the suspect's release, Israel
nevertheless recalled its ambas-
sador to France. Angered Is-
raelis took to the streets of Tel
Aviv, where they hurled eggs
at the French embassy in pro-
test. Flurries of denouncement
came both from West Germany
and Israel - as well as from
the United States, where the
State Department Wednesday
formally told France of its dis-
may. The French government,
however, rejected the U.S. crit-
icism in a terse statement is-
sued the following day.
Meanwhile, the shock waves
hit close to home when a bomb
threat was telephoned to the
French Consulate in Detroit.

Vance

BACK
Reward Money
f'ITY COUNCIL voted last
Monday night to offer
X14,000 in reward money for in-
formation leading to the arrest
and conviction of the person or
persons responsible for the rash
of assaults and rapes that have
plagued Anni Arbor in recent
months.
But the move was far from
I lani olls. Both Mayor Albert
Wheeler and Councilwoman Liz
Keogh ;toted against it. Wheel-
er thought that the money might
be more effectively spent in~
rape prevention programs and
transportation for women at
night. Toe also expressed con-
cern nivoit the constitutional
rights of black males who re-
semble composite photographs
of the rape suspect.
Keogh accused Mayor Pro
Ten, and Republican Mayoral
candidate Louis Belcher, who
nroposed the award, of using
it as a "cheap political trick."
* * *
State of State
TN HIS STATE of the State
address on Thursday, Gov-
ernor Milliken asked legislators
for the power to appoint memi-
bers of the University Board of
Regents. as well as members
of the Wayne state and Michi-
gan State University.boards.
They are currently chosen in
statewide elections.
Milliken said the appointive
process worked well in the se-
lection of governing board mem-
bers for the state's ten other
colleges and university's, but
the reaction from a predomi-
nantly democratic Board of Re-
gents here was singularly un-
enthusiastic.
"' think it's irresponsible of
the Governor," said Regent Paul
Brown (D-Petoskey).
"I don't see any reason to
change the existing system,"
said Regent Robert Nederlander
(D-Detroit). "It has worked well
in this state."
It doesn't seem to make any
'difference to University Presi-
dent Robben Fleming. "I never
thought myself that it was , a
crucial point whether they (the
Regents) were appointed or
elected."
The argument may all be
academic. There is little chance
a democratically-controlled state
legislature would approve such
a measure.

....

VAN BOVE N'S §§
ANNOUNCES THEIR $
.20--50% REDUCTIONS on
CLOTHING FURNISHINGS AND SHOES


FCLOTHING FURNISHINGS
WuINTERSALE
SSport Coats Dress Shirts
Trousers Sport Coats s
o Storm Coats Ki n
g Including Leather V l u h rs n h e si
SCTop Coats Ties H

STOP
EVERYONE'S READING
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
ARE YOU ?

0-
MAI ZETTERLING'S 1968
LYSISTRATA (The Girls)
THE GIRLS are actresses in a production of LYSISTRATA (the first
anti-war feminist play) and they take its lessons to heart. Zetterling
directs Ingmar 'Bergman regulars Harriet Anderson, Bibi Anderson,
Gunnar Bjornstrand and Gunnel Lundbloom in a shattering blend of
fantasy and reality.
Tuesday: A NIGHT AT THE OPERA
CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
CI E AG ID 7:00 & 9:05 Admission $1.25
WALTER LANG 1957
TRACY-HEPBURN-in-
DESK SET

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