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April 10, 1977 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-04-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sunday, April M, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pace Five

_u d y A rl 10_9 7 H IC I ADl '

f eJu I Fiv

A home away from Israeli Labor Party

}*

home for sick kids

leaders back Peres

BUY

YtRBOOK

(Continued from Page 1
few and far between. Ask Mi-
chael if he likes anything about
the hospital ,- its doctors and
nurses, its brightly furnished in-
terior, and children's activities
-and he r4sponds with a deci-
sive "no!"
Despite what Michael says, his
parents often find the hospital
to be a blessing in light of their
son's condition.
In addition to keeping the
Normands informed of the
course of Michael's illness, the
hospital provides them with ad-
vice on how to cope with the'
situation. A social worker
speaks with them periodically
and arranges sessions between
parents of other children on iM-
chael's floor.
"I realize that I have to live
one day at a time," Ms. Nor-
mand says. "If he gets sicker,
I'll worry about it then. We just
can't dwell on the future."
THE MOTT STAFF also goes
to great lengths to keep the ,;
children amused during their
stay. Since many of the chil-
dren stay for long periods of
time, the hospital maintains its
own miniature school system so|,
the children will not be too far I
behind in their schoolwork when1
they return home. Suzanne Hen-
derson, a teacher in the hospi-
tal, tries to keep in contact withI
the child's own teacher so the
hospitalized child can keep up
with his or her classmates.
However, teaching in ahospi-
tal situation is not always ideal.-
"We try to stick to our lesson
plans, but we have to be flex-
ible," explains Henderson. "If a
child isn't feeling well, or is1
worried about his illness, some-{
times its better just to drop the
lessons and do something that
the child wants to do."
IN THE AFTERNOON, some
kind of activity is usually plan-
ned by the SchoolYActivities
staff: either an arts and crafts
exercise or children's game.I
Michael proudly displays the at-
tractive fish he created from
two paper plates, and his moth-
er is equally proud of the neck-
lace he made for her.I
These activities have given
Michael the opportunity to meet
some of the other chillren in the
hospital.-
"He and his friends Kip and
Danny take turns going to each
others' rooms to play, and he
and a boy named Matt used to
have races down the hall in the
wheel chairs," says Ms. Nor-
mand. "If it wouldn't be for the
pokes and the medication, he'd
have a ball here."
Valerie Hobbie, the head nurse
on Michael's floor, explains!
some of the reasons Mott's
treatment plan is so effective.
"WE MEET THE CHILD on
his own level. We have to get
an idea of what each individual
understands and work from
there," she says.
According to Hobbie, who has
been at Mott for seven years,
the hospital's hematology de-
partment is a great asset. "We
get referrals from Ohio, Indi-
ana, and all over Michigan -
patients with tumors or leuke-
mia who come from hospitals
where they weren't as investiga-
tional as they are here," she
says.
"We're very concerned with
meeting the children's psycho-
logical needs," Hobbie contin-
tes. "We don't deal with what's
going to happen next."
One helpful procedure, ac-
cording to Hobbie, is permitting
parents to room with their chil-

ABC CHARTERS I

'rr. "'Senaration anxie'y can
=ke hos italization very trau-
-ntic and hinder the treatment
process " she says.
Hobbie also credits the other'
nurses for their performance
in a business where emotions
can often run 'very high.
"IT'S HARD to deal with chil-
dren who are very sick, espe-
cially those who are dying,"she
says. "They have to work j
through their own feelings on!
death before they can be effect-
ive. I almost quit after my first,
year, it was so difficult to
handle."
Michael's doctor, Steven Park-
er, a fourth year medical stu-
dent specializing in pediatrics,
has his own ideas on why Mott
offers such a successful treat-
ment package.
"Children's hospitals on the

(Continued from Page 1)
announcement said. It added
that Allon would be placed sec-
ond on the party slate.
Political observers said it was
possible that Peres might be
named interim prime minister
to replace Rabin before the elec-
tion.
PERES .considered to be a

The violation is not considered
setious, and one legal expert
likened it to a traffic offense.
Had Rabin not been prime min-
ister, the matter might have
gone unnoticed.
THE LAW IS designed to force
Israelis to turn in their hard
nlirrannehn .n A i

a /II, L1Du1UL 0 currency, such as American dol-
"hawk" in the Arab-Israeli con- lars or Swiss francs, in exchange
fliction and a protege of war for Israeli pounds. The govern-
hero Moshe Dayan, now awaits ment then uses the other cur-
confirmation by the L a b o r rencies to pay for weapons or
party's left wing. luxury items it must purchase
AS THE NO. 1 candidate on abroad.
the Labor party ballot, the 53- Israel's foreign debt has been
year-old defense minister would running at about $4 billion an-
be named prime minister if the nually since the 1973 Mideast
party retains control of the gov- war. Foreign currency reserves
ernment in the elections. -the amount of hard cash in
ISRAEL'S FOREIGN curren- Israel's treasury-amount to an
cy law, which figured promi- estimated $1.15 billion, enough
nently in Rabin's fall, is viewed to pay for two months' worth of

whole, are a lot more psycho- as outdated by some financiers impo
social than others. The school and is widely ignored by thou- level
and play programs here are real sands of Israelis. bank
good because the children get But the government believes
a lot of individual attention," the law is vital to an economyd M
he says. strained by years of war and defe
Another helpful method Hob- the demands of its luxury-mind- can-
bie and Parker note is the use I ed citizens. cost
of a special treatment room IT WAS alleged that Rabin good
when painful, frightening ther- and his wife kept accounts total- gold
apy is necessary. The idea be- ling $21,000 in a U.S. bank. cuss
hind the room is simple: the The currency law forbids most Me
child's bed should be safe! Israelis from holding foreign resigi
ground for him, wherebhe need currency here orin banks! skepi
not experience any pain. abroad, although thousands of wher
Israelis do. Exceptions include get r
PARKER, TOO, has had to immigrants who have been in belies
deal with the fact that some of the country less than 10 years or bin's
the children he treats just can't Israelis living abroad. Israelis slow
be helped. i holding more than $5,000 face sump
"You -learn to put some dis- criminal prosecution.I talks.
tance there," he says. "It's hard:
no matter what you do. You
care but there's always some
distance."'
In spite of these drawbacks,
Parker enjoys his job a great
deal. "I really like working with Fe a te
kids," he says. "Kids are so
resilient - so fresh and inno-
cent, not at all self-conscious. I
guess what I really like is that
if you get a kid better, he's got
his whole life ahead of him."

arts. Economists say that
is dangerously close to
ruptcy. .
uch of the money goes for
nse needs, including Ameri-
built Fly jet fighters that
$25 million each. But a lot
goes for imported luxury
s for the Israeli middle
s.
anwhile, reports of Rabin's
nation werereceived with
ticism in the Arab world,
e leaders are expected to
ich on the job. Some Arabs
:ved Israel would use Re-
departure as an excuse to
down efforts toward re-
ption of Middle East peace

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