100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 08, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-04-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

_Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, April 8, 1.971

PageTwoTHE ICHGAN AIL FriayApri 8,197

I I 111111

l THE UNIVERSITY DANCERS Present:
9eq. 6ver c j
April 8th & 9th at 8:00 P.M.
TWO SEPARATE PROGRAMS
STUDIO THEATRE A
Dance Buildingv
H.de A Donations: $1.00
;_."'.f < -...~YE3<-- " t<-->, <--<.<-->C0 "<> _<--> 1

Israeli Prime Minister Rabin resigns

City wins building
freeze delay

(Continued from Page 1)
Rabin, t,-ho narrowly surviv-
ed a challenge for the Labor
Party's leadership from De-
fense Minister Simon Peres last
month, said he would not now
lead the party in the general
elections just 40 days away.
The resignation of the Israeli
Prime Minsiter adds uncertain-
ty to U. S. - sponsored moves

SSO
Noreen Keleshian, Grad. Sch. Business
SAdmin. '77, replies to the question What
does Genesee Cream Ale really taste like?"
IlkL
Genesee Cream Ale.
No other beer or ale comes
close to it at all. The nearest
thing to it is, uh...hmmm, welt l
maybe it's...uhhh...
It's something different.
GBCo oc h N

towards a Middle East peace
settlement, officials in Wash-
ington said yesterday.
THE STATE Department had
no official reaction and ana-
lysts said an assessment was
difficult in view of the highly
unpredictable political situation
in Israel.
Even if Rabin had led his rul-
ing Labour Party into next
month's general election, its
performance was unpredictable
and the new government's atti-
tudes were expected to be in-
fluenced by the margin of the
party's losses or gains.
The Labor Party central
committee will meet Sunday to
decide who will head the party,
Defense Ministry spokesman
Naftalie Levie reported.
HE SAID Defense Minister
Peres was as surprised as the
rest of the country at Rabin's
resignation and "heard of: it
for the first time on the radio
like everyone else."
Peres lost a bruising fight
U I)
BOR r

BUT $18,000 is nearly four ner," le said.
years' salary for the average
Israeli, and Rabin noted that "I FEEL ISRAEL may have
in an election campaign "it lost the prime minister best
takes on harsh dimensions." suited to further peace and pre-
Because of inflation and the'vent war''
various scandals involving gov- It was not immediately clear5
ernment construction, invest- how Rabin could leave his post
ments and land, tthe Labor in the 'pre-election period. There,
Party is facing its toughest were suggestions he might take
election campaign in history. a leave of absence and turn
Rabin, in the campaign, had his responsibilities over to Dep-
pledged to clean up corruption uty Prime Minister Yigal Al-
and often said, "no one will es- Ion, who is also foreign minis-
cape justice, no matter how ter.
high in office he is."
Rabin became the Jewish
"HE ACTED like a man," state's fifth prime minister and
said an Israeli caller to a radio the first to have been born in
talk show where the resignation what was then British - mandat-
was discussed. "He did wrong ed Palestine - he was born in
and he took the blame." Jerusalem in 1922.
ibruk
CIaiied
1O
SS

with Rabin for the party leader-
ship at a convention last Feb-
ruary.
Many Israelis might agree
with Rabin that the bank ac-
count issue was "secondary,"
compared to some of the finan-
cial scandals that have brought
down prominent Labor party
figures in the past year.

Rabin, who succeeded Prime
Minister Golda Meir, said he
was leaving office with a heavy
heart "because I feel I was
forced to leave my post too
early."t
"Most of my efforts were I
centered on the striving for
peace and to ensure Israel's se-R
curity in the best possible man-

(Continued from Page 1) i Veigel's satisfaction with the
bring its sewage treatment into appeals court action, attorney
compliance with state and fed-,William Barense, representing
eral water quality laws. | plaintiffs in the case, angrily
"Although the effluent (sew- lashed out at the postponement
age plant discharge into the ! of the construction ban.
river) isn't everything that the ; "It's hard to comprehend that
State Department of Natural Re- the city admits it is violating
ources (DNR) would like, it i the law and the appeals court'
isn't that much worse than the: says that it's ok to do it," he
river itself," remarked Laid-! remarked.
law. He said a new sewage' "
treatment plant with double the violain ederal standards for
capacity of the current facility suspended solids. fecal coliform
will be fully operational in threep (bacteria) and phosphorous in
years. The new plant will pro- the effluent," he added. "If you
vide tertiary level treatment as exceed the flow specifications,
opposed to the "secondary lev- then you're just if you'll pardon
el treatment the current plant the expression, dumping shit
provides," Laidlaw added. Ter- the river."
tiary treatment means the dis- i
charge would be "virtually Both Barense and Laidlaw ex-
drinkable," he said. pressed confidence that their
Laidlaw blamed state and positions are legally sound.
federal delays for Ann Arbor's "Judge Fink was absolutely
current sewage treatment prob- correct on the law," commented
lems. "The city over a decade Barense. "Whether he'll be up-
ago applied for permission to held, I don't know."
expand its plant. The DNR noti- "Judge Fink's ruling was, to
fied the city it couldn't expand putitmildl~y, a novel in~erpie-
the plant. The DNR wanted a tation ofthe law," countered
regional super sewer. By the Laidlaw. "Our case on appeal is
time that issue was settled, the fairly strong."
federal government had chang-
ed all its regulations, and we
had to apply all over again for
the funds," Laidlaw stated.
"JUDGE FINK'S order, wouldi
have had a catastrophic effect
had it been upheld," said FredAi
Veigel, president of the Huron
Valley Labor Council. "It would
completely cripple the construc-
tion area industry in this area,"
he added. "There would be a
ripple effect throughout the local
economy. Without new construc-0
tion, rents would sky-rocket. The
whole town would start to die at j j ^L 9 8 0
the roots."
In contrast to Laidlaw's and (Continued from Page 1)

r
t
t
t
r
I
T
l
'r

If something's going
wrong, it'll tell you.
1.Change in bowel or
bladder habits.
2. A sore that does not
heal.,
3. Unusual bleeding or
discharge.
4. Thickening or lump ins
breast or elsewhere.
5. Indigestion or difficulty
in swallowing.
6. Obvious change in wart
or mole.
7. Nagging cough or
hoarseness.
If you have a warning sig-
nal, see your doctor. If it's
a false alarm, he'll tell
you. If it isn't. you can ive
hIimn time to help. Don't be
afraid. It's what you don't
know that can hurt you.
American
Cancer Society.
"Sp5 PCkCNTR7u'1O u BY 4f PukesfO

Midwest's Lorgest Selection of
European Charters
Canadian and U.S.
from $289
CALL 769-1776
Great Places
TRAVEL CONSULTANTS
216 S. 4th Ave, Ann Arbor

I

I

many of us did when I was here
at the Univeresity of Michigan."
The president-turned-professor,
who has been lecturing in Angell
Hall, reminisced about his ear-
lier days here as a student, say-
ing candidly: "I used to have a
number of classes in Angell Hall
-some that I enjoyed and some
that I didn't. I did well in some,
and I, uh, was less competent
in some."
Ford and his staff are already
looking ahead to his planned, re-
turn visits next fall and winter,
when they may extend his lec-
tures to include classes in eco-
nomics and history.
"I think it will be more equit-
able to the student body as a
whole if we go above and be-
yond political science. The Pres-
ident has exposure to topics oth-
er than government itself," the
famous professor explained.

2 MORE DAYS OF

li

Qlrich 's 6th Annual
$300,000.00
STORE WIDE SALE
Huge Savings on Every Item in Stock
EXCEPT TEXTBOOKS and SPECIAL ORDERS
SALE RUNS THRU SATURDAY, 8:30-5:30
CHECK our SPECIAL PRICES on CALCULATORS

I

i

By the time,
we're old enough to
have children, we've
been thoroughly sold
on the idea.
By our parents,
our grandparents,
our friends and
neighbors, the media,
everyone.
It's hard to
remember we ever,
had a choice in the
first place.
But there is a
choice. Having a
child is a tremendous
responsibility and
an important decision.
Probably the most
important decision
we'll ever make.
And once it's
made, it can never
be undone.
Just remember-...
you do have a choice.
So think about it,
and do what's right
for you.
For more information write
----------------
National
Organization
for
Non-Parents
806 Reisterstown Road
Baltimore, Maryland 21208
I'd like to know more about N 0A.
Please send me your free
"Am I Parent Material" package.
name

i

12

r

I

JOHN COLTRANE
THE JOHN COLTRANE GROUP FEATURING
ERIC DOLPHY AND McCOY TYNER

J

The Other Village
Vanguard Tapes
Collectors and Coltraneologists have long
wondered what riches might be hidden
on 'the other Village Vanguard tapes"
and now they have the answer.

ACCORDING to his executive
assistant, Bob Barrett, Ford
plans to visit approximately 25
schools over the next three
years, including black schools
and junior colleges.
Presently on the agenda are
the University of Kentucky for
next Monday, University of
Southern California (USC) May
10-13. the University of Texas,
the University of Nebraska, the
University of Pennsylvania and
the University of Florida.
Barrett also said that the ex-
president's schedule is likely to
be much lighter when he returns
to the University next year. Yes-
terday's brief interview was
tightly sandwiched in between
lunch with Honors students in
Political Science and a meeting
with the department's teaching
assistants.
EARLIER in the day, he met
with some journalism students
and faculty and the National En-
dowment for the Humanities
(NEH) fellows as well as the
American Chief Executive class.
And before dinner, he joined
football coach Bo Schembech-
ler and the team for practice on
Ferry Field.
This morning he breakfasts
with the Political Science fac-
ulty, meets with the depart-
ment's non-teaching graduate
students, then lunches with the
Undergraduate Political Science
Association.
Finally, he, meets with his
last class this term from 1:30 to
3 p.m. to discuss "Issues in
World Politics." Immediately
afterwards, he will be whisked
off to Willow Run Airport to
fly to Grand Rapids for the
Easter holiday.
Puerto Rico was ceded to the
U. S. by Spain in 1898.
Gross tonnage is a volume
measurement.

11111MIS-k

JOHN COLTRANE
THE OTHER VILLAGE VANGUARD TAPES
The John Coltrane Group
Featuring Eric Dolphy And McCoy Tyner

5 99
2 RECORD
SET

EC.

7, j
'_
,
}
5
uti ,

SCHOOLKIDS' CARRIES A COMPLETE
SELECTION OF THE GREAT. Ill )IIe
JAZZ LINE . . Featuring important recordings by such artists as:
Albert Ayler, Goto Barbieri, Basie, John Coltrane, Coleman
Hawkins, Milt Jackson, Keith Jarrett, Elvin Jones, Yusef Lateef,
Charles Mingus, Oliver Nelson, Sam Rivers, Gil Evans, Sonny.
Rollins, Max Roach, Pharoah Sanders, Archie Shepp, McCoy.
Tyner, and more ...

"N IA"
The BLACK Yearbook
is on sale NOW.
Aiojlnln nt the

At the Evervdav Price of

am

I

4 '.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan