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April 07, 1977 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-04-07

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Arts & Entertainment THEsMaCHAGAN DA1LY age Five
Thursday, April||| 7, 1977 ||E| |||| ||| || P-g Fiv

* Siegel
By MIKE TAYLOR
"THE EXPRESSION of emotion is not
always a pleasant, pretty, painless
thing. I'm a believer in intensity," states
local musician Dick Siegel.
Siegel's rich, authentic voice is the
peifect instrument to convey the amus-
ing incidents and deeply felt experi-
ences that are his songs. His colorful
melodies are frequently beautiful and
always evocative of feelings and situa-
tions, his lyrics filled with imagery and
ewnotion. Eiegel's guitar and harmonica
accrnrpaniments are as imaginative and
spirited as his songs.
Although he lists among his influences
such diverse artists as Louis Jourdan,
Rosco Holkum, Fiirray Lewis, Doc
Bogs, Roosevelt Sykes, Elvis Presley,
and Van Morrison. he doesn't really
sound like any of them: in the last few
ytits he has forged a musical and Kvr-
ical style completely his own. In short,
Dick Siegel is an immensely talented
musician.
AS A KID, Siegel had lessons in "lots
of instruments", but the only one he
really liked was self-taught-drums. Af-
ter leaving his native New Jersey to
become a University stident in 1967, he
took iii, guitar.
"I liked to sing and I wanted to have
so-ethint to s ie with," he exnlained.
The gvita led him to the traditional
bl"'^ nrd folk music that nlavs a strong
rolo in h .nUtrent msic. Ha ddn't write
his first sone wt-1 9f*'.r he had finichad
schelt ;and mnst of hs writine has been
do'e in "the nast two or three veoro"
HO WDOES SIEGEL write one of his
marvelous songs?

folk

virtuoso

See 'Tambourines'

"The light songs come easily. The
more intense the emotion, the more deep
it is, the more difficult it is. To write
about a painful experience you have to
keep re-experiencing and re-experiencing
it. I have the constant sense that this
thing will never be written. It requires
a great will to finish it. I try to avoid
working on it."
Siegel views his tunes as "vehicles
for creative expression to . emulate
through. It's like a dream. Most schools
of thought relegate' the unconscious to
the 'not real'. To me, the unconscious is
very real and always operating."
A COUPLE OF 'IMES a year, Siegel
is the Thursday "local night" attraction
at the Ark coffee house. He also plays
at almost every Wednesday night Hoote-
nanny at the Ark, and shows up from
time to time at local spots such as Mr.
Flood's Party.
"It's always been good at the Ark.
Mr. Flood's is a noisy bar. There've
been times there when people at a table
five feet ,away are busy yelling at each
other. When I'm performing. for me to
enjoy myself I need people to be at-
tentive to the music. The music I play
is not background music," Siegel com-
ments.
The last time Siegel played local night
at the Ark, he came on in a $200 suit he
had bonriht for $7 at a Kiwanis auction
sale. An amsing, earthy effect, it set
the tone for what was to be a wonderful
performance. Siegel's songs are as di-
verse as his manv experiences. "Gator"
is a funny tale about a bully who makes
all the neighborhood kids take off their
clothes and dance in front of him.

THE SONG Siegel wrote when he
thought he might lose an eye, "Dear
Sam", is a haunting ballad. "For Elisa"
is an up-beat, Dylanish effort with a
hilarious story line. Siegel's intense,
powerful voice was at its best during
"The Ballad of Eddie Cantor". "Just
for You", a "little love song", is just
that. Most fun of all, however, was "Hee
Bee Bee Bee Boo", Siegel's contribution
to the art of the nonsense song.
Although Siegel is able to create ex-
cellent melodies and moods with just his
buitar and harmonica, he frequently
plays with a couple of local musicians
happily called the "Ministers of Melo-
dy." Tom McGovern on flute and har-
mony vocals and Bruce Dondero, on
acoustic bass, provide a jazz counter-
point to Siegel's folk and blues back-
ground. When played by the Ministers of
Melody, Siegel's sones are longer and
more complexly developed. "I really en-
joy performing by myself, but playing
with Tom and Bruce is more musical
and prettier", Siegel commented.
WHAT WILL the future ' bring for
Siegel? He'd like to move to a metropoli-
tan area, perhaps somewhere in the
East, where "I could make this a liv-
i-g." He's in the process of making
demos to send to record companies. His
performing style may also be changing.
"An advantage to electrifying your
guitar is that you can play with other
instruments and still be heard," he re-
marks.
In any case, Dick Siegel seems certain
to go a long way. Catch him around
town while you still can!

By JOSHUA PECK
SWEET GOSPELamusic and
a close look at a "store-
front church" in Harlem will'
highlight the final PTP Guest?
Artist production, Tambourines,
to Glory, running April 13-17 at'
the Power Center.
The musical, co-sponsored by
the Black Theater Program
and the Professional Theatert
Program, centersionaa versionl
of the Faust theme as a ghetto
hustler, Buddy Lomax, corrupts
the morals of one of the two
female ministers of the ghettoi
church. Laura, the minister, is
wooed by the slick Lomax into'
selling bogus holy water, help-.
mg to run a numbers ring, and1
other such unsavory enterprises.t
Melodramatic and comic mo-I
ments alternate as the playI
builds to a violent climax, land-i
ing Laura's innocent sister min.-
ister in iail.t
Langston Hughes, better
known as a poet, wrote the book
for Tambourines and collabor-j
ated with Jobe Huntley on the<
music. When the play opened,
on Broadway in 1963, it was,
treated harshly by the critics.T
Von Washington, the director of '

the current production, believes
that at that time, white theater-
goers (including the critics)
were too ignorant about black
home and church life to appre-
ciate the plot and flavor of the
play. Since then, though, "musi-
cals like Don't Bother Me, I
Can't Cope and My Arms Too
Short to Box with God have
given whites an understanding
of the black experience, and
particularly of the storefront
church. Roots has helped too."
Director Von Washington
notes that the Broadway pro-
duction of Tambourines to
Glory used an orchestra, where-
as only a piano and organ will
be used in the current produc-
tion. "I have a bone to pick
with Broadway - they com-
merialize everything. We're us-
ing only a piano and organ be-
cause those are the instruments
that are really in the churches."
There will be performances
next Wednesday through Sun-
day at 8 n.m. plus one at 2 on
Sunday. Tickets are on sale at -
the PTP Ticket Office in the
Mendelssohn Theatre Lobby at
the Michigan League.

Dailv Photo by ANDY FREEBERG
Dck Siegel

r

(JUDGEMENT AT NUREMBERG':

UAC brings 'Magic' revue

TH E UNIVERSITY DANCERS Present:
April 8th & 9th at 8:00 P.M.
TWO SEPARATE PROGRAMS
n Ne1% .k STUDIO THEATRE A
Dance Building
SDonations:$1.00
POETRY READING
WITH
ROBERT CLIFFORD
JIM ROBINS
READING FROM THEIR WORKS
THURS.. April 7-7:30 p.m.
at GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE (Corner of Oakland)
REFRESHMENTS

Ophuls' Il F
By MICHAEL BROIDY and the Pity. Ophuls, in the new
film, utilizes old documentary
FILM FANS recently witnessed film which has been given new
the Ann Arbor premiere of meaning with the addition of
Marcel Ophuls' The Memory of new commentary or by being !
Justice, a decidedly important placed in a new context: old;
work. material crosscut with new foot-
The film takes its title from 1age (usually of the same loca-
Plato and is, in fact, a search tion or person as they appear
for the Platonic idea of justice. in the present); interviews with
Most of Ophuls' almost five-hour both prominent and obscure peo-
quest attempts to reconstruct ple who were involved with
and reconsider the Nuremberg 1 these events, such as Dr. Ger-
trials, leading to the question hard Rose, a medical officer
which lies at the heart of the who was implicated in the in-!
film: Who are we to judge ... human experiments performed
what collective and individual on concentration camp inmates;
guilt was in Nazi Germany? Albert Speer, a confidante of
Were the Nuremberg prosecu- Hitler; Lord Shawcross, the
tors blameless and do their con- British prosecutor at Nurem-!
ceptions of guilt and justice ap- burg; Telford Taylor, the Amer-
ply to day to Vietnam, Algeria, ican prosecutor, and members
and Latin America? of Ophuls' own family including
Ophuls doesn't provide any his wife Regine, who was once
easy answers to these questions; a member of the Nazi youth in.
perhaps there are none. Rather, Germany.
his probing interviews, justa-'
posed with old newsreel foot- The Memory of Justice is in-

)robes

i

By ANDREW KURTZMAN
V VEN IF you've never been a'
fan of Broadwav music-

exciting show that tries its best
to show the versatility of mu-
sical theatre at its best."

really don't know what I ex- als it would be a mistake to Musical Magic is based on a
pected," she remarks). We
watch the then young woman pass up UAC's song-and-dance revue Lazarus conceived two
walk past one of her captors, revue this weekend. Musical years ago, which will be touring
and Ophuls freezes the frame, Magic chronicles over seven de- Poland and Russia this sum-t
preserving this moment in his- cades of the best in musical mer as a sort of 'good will am-a
tory. theatre in a sparkling and emi- bassador'. This weekend's show
Other moments capture this nently enjoyable show. is produced by UAC's Jim
mixture of horror and irony. Stern, who also produced last
Dr.' Gerhard Rose (the medical semester's How To Succeed in
officer implicated in the in- Musical Magic's talented and Business Without Really Try-
human experiments) relates that energetic cast of fifteen will be ing. Music director Mike Stock-
he was condemned to a life term presenting numbers from such ler and Choreographer Sherri
in prison or appropriate places musicals as. A Chorus Line, Fenkel agree the show is bound
in prionnmn.a phlprpit ore West Side Story, 110 in the to be entertaining: "The corn-
of confinement. Ophuls then Shade, The Fantastiks and Bye pany is a very talented and
cuts away from a tight close- Bye Birdie. There are no sets hardworking group. They can't
,up of Rose's face to reveal an or costumes. As director Scottmiss."
attractive living room and, with Lazarus explains, "It isn't a
another cut, an outside view of clumsy, pretentious production. Musical Magic will be pre-
his beautiful house and garden; Musical Magic is an intimate, sentedtonight, in the .Union
it is a devasting, yet quietly_.___-
stated irony brought about by
a filmmaker in total control of
his medium.
THE MEMORY of Justice is! GOSPELIMUISI
rich with scenes such as those l
just described, along with in-f by the
sights and characters sweeping
the entire spectrum of human!U.tOF M GOSPEL H(
experience - victims, murder- OF CH
ers, philosophers, ordinary "peo- (formerly Trotter House Choir)
ple on the street." Truth and
the meaning of justice are con- FRIDAY APRIL 8-12:15
tinually sought, but Ophuls nev- -15 pm
er makes things easy - the
spectator must write his or her ON THE DIAG
own conclusion. And it is an un- IN FRONT OF THE GRAD LIBRARY
forgettable experience.
(in case of rain, in the Fishbowl)
Sponsored by several campus ministries(
)w 'Legs _
Choreographers for the con-
cert are Barbara Baum, Caro-
lyn Dorfman, Jan Engholm, "<'.
Marguerite Harper, Cecile
Keith, Susan Melton, Kathy
Morse, and Julie Schneider.
Tickets for the concert are the
suggested donation of $1 at the1 N *h'*
!door .....

Ballroom and Friday and Sat-
urday nights in -the Union's
Pendleton room. The show be-
gins at 8 p.m. and admission is
$2. at the door. As director La-
zarus states, .Musical Magic is
the perfect show for the person
who is unfamiliar with Broad-
way musicals, and a real treat
for the connoisseur."

UAC PRESENTS

UAC PRESENTS

ThoNciT,

Performance: Pendelton Room
APRIL 7-9 8:00p.m. TICKETS $2.00
on sale Michigan Union
A COLLAGE OF SHOWSTOPPING NUMBERS FROM BROADWAY'S GREATEST MUSICALS!!
cmn it idI-

age, enlighten and lead the
viewer to further thoughts and
questions, about the vitally im-
portant issues raised in this
film.
THE CINEMATIC TOOLS with
which Ophuls conveys his ideas
are, to say the least, prodigi-
ous, surpassing even those util-
ized in an earlier historical doc-
ument by Ophuls, The Sorrowl

undated with magic moments
of irony, truth, and compassion.
For example, Marie-Claude Vail-
lany-Courtier, a survivor of
Auschwitz, recalls her testimony
at Nuremberg, accompanied by
Ophuls' footage of Her testimony
of some thirty years earlier.
She realizes thirty years later
that her Nazi captors looked
like rather ordinary people ("I

I

t

Senior dancers sh(

Changes In Latitudes,
{ Changes In Attitudes
/
HavaaDamdreamin'
IMMY BUFFETTf

JIMMY BUFFET
Changes- In latitudes
Changes In Attitudes

J"HE SENIORS of the Univer-
sity Dance Department will
appear in concert Friday and
Saturday at 8 p.m. in the Stu-
dio Theater at the new Dance
Building, 1310 North University
Court, behind the Central Cam-
pus Recreation Building.
The senior concert - "Legs'

and guitar. Dances will be per-
formed to music by Luciano
Berio, Jeffrey Evans, Roland
Hanna, Leo Ornstein, Jean-
Pierre Rampal and Claude Bol-
ling, and Gwendolyn Watson.
Slides and sculpture will round
out the two varied dance eve-
nings.

Jimmy B u f f ett

and his Coral

Over Easy" - will be an inter-
arts experience for local dance'
viewers. As the graduating pro-
duction for eight students, the
concert offers a completely dif-
ferent program each evening, R I
including a group piece by each
choreographer as well as the
performance of a solo.
Featured in the dances will be

kTTENTION STUDENTS:
ESERVE EARLY AND SAVE $

MOVING CENTER

T.M.
Iand fte sdnge girl,

kk

poetry by Carolyn Clougn ,.ob-
ert Frost, and Wendy Ellen
Schacknow. Live musical accom-
paniment will include percus-
sionists - singly and in ensem-
ble - the Collegiate Chorale
Jain The Daily
Arts Staff
& /" /"' /"\ /" /" /"x/"\

r

Do it in DEX, the big-bottomed
shoes with sole. Do it with style,
all clearly defined with savvy
stitching on super-supple
Nature Hide in the gentle colors
of a hillside. Want to get talked
about? Get yourself DEX-rated.
Fast.
DEXTER

Reefer Band are back and with their
CHANGES IN ATTITUDES the time
has come for reefer madness.
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