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April 07, 1977 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-04-07

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Thursday, April 7, 1977T

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Ford hits arms 'rhetoric'

(Continued from Page 1)
sides to achieve an agreement,"
Ford said. "Some of the rhetoric
concentration has had the im-
pact of making negotiations
much more difficult."
Ford seemed to be echoing re-E
marks made only the day before
by former Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger. In a Washing-
ton speech, Kissinger was re-
ported to have warned the Car-
ter administration of its over.-
dependence on "rhetoric" in the
SALT negotiations.
Brezhnev and Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei Gromyko have
also publicly protested the U.S.
attitude prior to the Moscow
meeting.
A legal
rip-off!
(Continued from Page 1)I
congressional mail, are among
the factors making this the first
billion-dollar Congress. The leg-
islative branch is budgeted to
spend just over $1 billion this
year.
At his regular morning news-
conference O'Neill said he be-
lieved the two clerks did no
outside work. Actually, public
records show Lankford performs
work regularly for the Republi-
can Congressional Boosters Club
and the National Republican
Congressional Committee, both,

THE THOUGHT that the new
administration may have "froz-
en itself" in its arms position
"worries me a bit," Ford said.
"They could and probably will4
be subjected to very, very vig-t
orous condemnation by elements<
inside the U.S."
"I respect that the over-opti-
mism, rhetoric and possible mis-
calculations might have seriousT
repercussions as far as U.S.-
Soviet relations are concerned,"
he said.l
"It appears to me that the'
perceived relationship (between1
the U.S. and the Soviets) is at
a very low point, perhaps the
lowest in the last five or six
years. I hope this apparent de-1
cay in good relations between
the two sides is only tempo-
rary."E
"THE TWO superpowers must
- in my judgment-work cooper-1
atively and make a maximum
effort (to ,reach an agreementt
on arms)," Ford said. {
The current strategic arms,
limitations treaty expires this
October, and, if the two coun-
tries fail to reach a new agree-
ment by then, Ford noted there
will be "very adverse affects,
not only on the U.S. and the So-
viet Union, but on the world as:
a whole."
T h e President-turned-profess-
or, speaking before a Political;
Science 111 class, appeared yes-I
terday as a man of many sides:

was' simply different than that
used by President Carter."
"It's too early to tell whether
the new technique will be suc-
cessful. . . . It may be produc-
tive or it may be harmful," Ford
added.
FORD, WHO seemed comfort-
able standing before some 400
class members and almost 100
reporters, smiled frequently in
response to students' questions.
Answering one query about the
low percentage of blacks who
voted Republican last Novem-
ber, Ford quipped, "Of course,
I think black voters who didn't
vote for me made a mistake."
On a more serious note, he said
the Republican record "was not
adequately conveyed" to blacks.
The formerapresident appear-
ed to make a special effort to
keep his name among those who
are considered candidates for
the presidency in 1980. Describ-
ing his feelings toward the pres-
idency, Ford said "regardless
of the burden, it has been a
great experience, and I would
try to repeat it, if I had the op-'
portunity."
OUTSIDE T H E auditorium,
members of the Spartacus Youth
League g a t h e r e d to protest!
Ford's presence. The demon-
stration, which included ban-
ners, placards and leaflets,
caused no apparent disruptions.
Ford will continue his lecture'
and speaking tour of the campus
today and tomorrow. _

TONIGHT at 7 & 9:05

TONIGHT at 7 & 9:05
. PG '5?P

-___ _- ENDS TONIGHT
"Seven Beauties"
& "Swept Away"
(R)
Complete Show at 7:20
TOMORROW-David Carradine is Woody Guthrie
in the Academy Award-Winning
"BOUND FOR GLORY"
(PG)

--- I

Daily Photo by JOHN KNOX
* "

I

uiA
Former President Ford leaves
age of alert Secret Servicemen
IBelchet
pti
eO

(Continued from Page 1)
mulating his own plan of action.
"We're currently gathering in-
formation from various poll
workers and challengers as to'
which ones (precincts) might
have had problems," Wheeler
said.
AFTER Belcher petitions for,
a recount, Wheeler will have 48
hours to decide which, if any,
precincts he wants recounted.
He indicated he would meet with
his staff to make those deci-
sions this morning.
Wheeler said he was sur-
prised that he had retained his
one-vote lead following the can-
vassers' tally because the origi-
nal results of the election had
been phoned in from various
precincts.
"I'm surprised there hadn't
been some mistakes with people
calling in totals," he said.
CANVASSER Beals said he,
too, had expected a change in
the original vote total. "It's un-
usual to go through a complete
set of totals and not find a,

gn&,ut ua crow aof which raise money for po- Ford the teacher, Ford the U.S.
litical campaigns. President, and at times, Ford!
the Michigan League yesterday, flanked by his usual entour- 1 A check of public records also the campaigner for President in
-" shows Lankford regularly do- 1980.
nates to the Boosters Club and FORD SHIED a w a y from
the Congressional Committee. judging Carter's controversial The
He has given a total of $7,000 statements on human rights..e_
since 1968."Whstrongly protested certain lacks
The first practical steam en- of consideration for h u m a n
f r v o te reco u n t gine was developed in 1765 by rights in a number of instances,"
S o rCJames Watt. he said. "The technique I used:
ed, "people were careful" on any coint changes would have
the original count, resulting in to be found among the paper GRETO GARBO in 1,941
the accurate vote totals. ballots, "where there is a ques- i 8:
But, Beals added, "It's a rare tion of interpretation."
election where nothing chang- BEALS NOTED that the re- G
es"cut1fte1pe alt George Cukor directed this last film in
es." count of the paper ballots
KENNEY, however, had not: would probably hurt Belcher which Garbo played. Though a labored '
expected much change in re- more than help him, becauseft
suits. "Our elections officials most of the challenged votes arce, it was nonetheless Condemned by
are pretty accurate," he said. were counted anyway. the legion of decency. A I s o starrin
Ironically, Kenney was de- "Since all they cquld do inld
feated in his 1966 City Council the recount is throw out the MeIvin Douglas, Constance Bennett and
bid by one vote. votes, and since Belcher got Roland Young
Beals said that the recount, about three quarters of all theR
to be conducted by the County absentee votes, the chances
Board of Canvassers, shouldn't would be three to one that the; FRI: DAY FOR'NIGHT
take longer than a week. votes thrown out would be:
Beicher's," he said.
THE RECOUNT involves a to- Wheeler said he believes hisCGUILD TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH.AUD
tal retallying of all votes cast, lead will hold firm or perhaps CINEMA 7:00 9:05 Admission $1.25
both from the machines and the even increase. "They (Belcher)
paper absentee ballots., have three times as many ab-
"I'll be surprised if there are sentee ballots, they have more
many changes in the recount of chance for error." he said.
the machine votes," Beals said,! "I suspect the recount will
"because when they were orig- help us," he added. "They're
inally read off, there were two forced to do it. They need to do
election officials and both a it."
Democratic and Republican Wheeler said that although
challenger watching. It's un- Belcher may pick up "two or
likely that all of them would three votes" in some precincts,
make the same mistake." he expects to gain an equal
Beals said he believes that number.

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Thursday, April 7
JAMES DEAN: FIRST
AMERICAN TEENAGER
(Ray Connolly, 1976) 7, 8:45 & 10:30-AUD. A
A sensitive and intelligent documentary about the career of one
of the screen's great actors and the impact his life and tragic death
had on fans worldwide. Included is very rare footage from his
brilliant television work in the days of live TV, clips from his
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NOT to be confused with the limp ABC television special, this Is
a serious look at a serious artist. Narrated by Stacy Keach. With
appearances by Sal Mines, Natalie Wood, Dennis Hopper. Featuring
the music of Elton John, The Eagles, David Bowie, Mike Oldfield,
Bad Company. ANN ARBOR PREMIERE.
SHOWTIMES ARE 7, 8:45 AND 10:30
ADMISSION $1.25
Friday, April 8 in -MLB-
"TH E PRODUCERS,"
"THE TWELVE CHAIRS,"
"THE NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD"
AND
"THE 1000 EYES OF DR. MABUSE"
Saturday, April 9 in MLB-
"ON THE WATERFRONT,"
"A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE"
AND
"THEATRE OF BLOOD"

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mistake somewhere."
Beals said that because a
close election had been expect-1

Top 'U' officials wary of
deficient funds from state

$1.95

a Gathering Place

I

I

S. University near Washtenaw
769-1744

(Continued from Page 1)
in two weeks. From there, if
passed, it will advance to the
House. At the same time, Uni-
versity Regents will meet next
week to decide how to meet con-
sequent budget needs.
Senator Charles Zollar (R-22nd
district), a member of the Sen-
ate subcommittee, said he be-
lieved the Senate would approve
the $10.4 million appropriation.
He indicated there may be an
attempt to increase that figure
"but with the present fiscal sit-
uation, we won't be able to fund
it any higher," he said.
University Vice President for

State Relations Richard Kenne- reach its recommendation. It
dy said,'however, that the Uni- considered the complexity of the!
versity would "make a con- school (does it have a medical
certed effort for additions to the school or is it a technical
bill." But, he added, "It's folly school? for example), as well as
to think there'll be vast im- student population and the in-
provement." flation factor. From these guide-
lines, Zollar said, "We came up
UNIVERSITY VICE President with a formula that is equit-
and Chief Financial Officer able."
James Brinkerhoff said the fig-
ure fell "far short of University -- - ---.
basic needs." As a result, there
is "bound to be a substantial in- The A n Ar 4
crease in tuition and cutbacks in
operation," he noted.
Zollar described the formula . -:V:
used by the subcommittee to
_. __..._ . uuu

r

...,,...

U

ebb< *~

Mental Health Research Institute
SEMINAR SERIES
GREGORY BATESON
ANTHRPOLOGY DEPARTMENT
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA
"Addiction and Challenge"
THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 1977
SEMINARS: 3:45 TEAS: 3:15
Room 1057 MHRI Room 2055 MHRI
TONIGHT is:
Dorm Night Greek Night '
Free admission with Free admission with
w a meal card proof of membership p
AT in a frat. or sorority

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