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April 06, 1977 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-04-06

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednescloy, Hprr o i y i c

THOUSANDS FLEE HOMES 3' . 2X^L,6 t ~ ux

r

Appalachian flooding kills 28
By The Associated Press i Red Cross sokesman at Louis- Virginia legislator, said the flood erly man standing in rushin

ngy

Rain-swollen rivers inundated
towns in the hilly Appalachians
yesterday, cutting communica-
tions and forcing thousands to
evaculate or wait for rescue. At
least 28 persons had been killed
by rain and wind storms in the
region.
The worst flooding was in
southern West Virginia and east-
ern Kentucky, where the Cum-
berland, Big Sandy and Ken-
tucky rivers topped flood walls
built to protect cities.
"THIS WILL BE the biggest
flood ever recorded on the upper
Cumberland," the N a t i o n a 1
Weather Service said.
"I'd say it's the worst in 40
years," said Lou Bondurant, al

ville.'"Hundreds of people are meant the end of the town. water up to his neck and cling-
being taken to shelters. Thou- "I don't believe there'll be ing to the side of the radio sta-
any fixing back. I believe this tion building.
sands of people are out of their is finished," he said.

homes."
The flooding Tug Fork, a tri-
butory of the Big Sandy, forced!
the 500 residents of the town of
Matewan, near Williamson on
the Kentucky border, to flee'
their homes. Some were re-!
ported trapped Tuesday on up-
per floors of taller structures.
A REPORTER who reached
Matewan Tuesday afternoon re-
ported a few two-story houses
poking above the water but the
rest of the town completely cov-
ered. Many houses had tipped1
over.
T. I. Varney, a former WestI

" a-- - w

-1,

All Students Interested in
JUDaAICSTrE
Come to a meeting
Wednesday April 6
at 4:00 in 3050 Frieze
Discussions led by experienced Judaic Studies
students on:
* Fall 1977 Offerings
* Professors in the Department
* Requirements for Judaic Studies Degrees
Passover cookies & candy will be provided

1

WILSON CISCO spentt
night in a boat rescuing stra
ed Matewan residents. "T
were screaming and hollering
over the place," he said.
The flooding killed at le
four persons in Kentucky, t
in West Virginia and two in V
ginia; an additional five persc
were reported missing in V
ginia b e f o r e communicati
were lost in flooded areas.
Patients at a hospital
Welch, W.Va., were moved
I upper floors whe4 the Tug F
poured into the town, floodi
the first floor. Methodist H
pital in Pikeville, Ky., ont
Big Sandy, was surrounded
water, andemergency patie
had to be brought in by boat.
PINEVILLE, KY., a town
nearly 3,000, was reported c
ered by 15 feet of water af
the Cumberland rose 18 f
above flood stage and pour
over the flood wall.
Williamson, W.Va., with 12,
residents, was completely c
off from the outside worldE
cept for a radio in a forest lo
out tower. The weather serv
predicted a flood crest there
52-54 feet, 25-27 feet above fl
stage and 10 feet above 19
record crest.
Bob Harvit, general mana
of Wililamson r a d i o stat
WBTH, said he watched an e

the
nd-
hey
all
ast
wo
rir..
ons
rir-
ons
in
to
ark
ing
fn-

-r -

"I RUSHED up front and had
our announcer begin a plea for
a boat," he said. One soon ar-
rived. "We don't know who got
him, but it was just in time."
The governors of Virginia and
Kentucky d e c 1 a r e d disaster
areas in their states.
The flooding was caused by
nearly five inches of rainfall
which the National Weather
Service said would be followed
by temperatures in the 30s. In
both Kentucky and West Vir-
ginia, a chance of snow and be-
low freezing weather were fore-
cast for today.

4 MORE DAYS OF

'os
the "IT'S TERRIBLE. It's terri-
by ble," a Wise County, Va., wo-
:nts man said yesterday as the
weather cleared. "But the sun's
coming up, thank God."
of Virginia's Department of High-
ov- ways and Transportation said
ter nearly 200 highways were block-
eet ed. It also said at least 18
red bridges were known destroyed,
and at least 52 more were out of
00service.
000 sThestorms that produced the
cut floods also caused high winds
ex- and tornados Monday that killed
ok 20 persons, 17 of them in one
ice housing project at Birmingham,
of Ala.
od ONE VICTIM at Ashville, Ala.,
was killed when. a tree well on
the backyard shelter where she
ger had hoped to escape the storm;
ion the house she left was not dam-
eld- aged.
The storm's high winds and
hail were also believed to have
contributed to the crash near
Atlanta of a Southern Airways
DC9 jetliner. At least 68 per-.
sons, including eight on the
ground, were killed in the crash.
The hillport airport at William-
son was being used as an evacu-
ation center and 20 boats from
a nearby state park were being
used to rescue residents trapped
in the upper floors and on the
roofs of their flooded homes.
WATER IN Williamson cover-
led the roofs of some homesain
low-lying areas.
IResidents of Barbourville and
Williamsburg in extreme south-
ern Kentucky were warned yes-
terday to evacuate to higher
ground as flood crest rolled to-
ward them.
The Cumberland was expected
to crest at 47 feet at Barbour-
ville late yesterday which would
be 20 feet over flood stage. The
crest at Williamsburg was ex-
pected to hit 38 feet by this eve-
ning-17 feet over flood stage.

AP Photo.
THE ENTIRE TOWN of Clinchport, Va. was given a baptism yesterday as a result of flooding from heavy rain which hit the
southwestern section of Virginia. The governor has declared the state a disaster area.

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AP Photo
U.S. 25-E, located in what used to be the hills of Eastern Kentucky, is now closed to alltraffic except canoes, motorboats and
rowboats. The raging Cumberland River tore through Harlan, Pineville, Middlesboro and other mountain hamlets Monday
night, leaving much of Pineville house-top deep in water yester day.
Mayor s wiyt

I ll S w!1

II ild Cherry r
E/ectrified li t/
including:
Baby Don't You Know
Hold On (With Strings)
Are You Boogieing Around On Your Daddy
Hot ToTrotJitsAll Up To You

IDl\'I'R \\NSE l
NI TI I'IFI ON I )
15t')11NG '1t)
including:
Disco Lights/Ode Infinitum
First Light Of The Morning/Dreams Of Tomorrow
Going Back To Kingston Town

Johnnie Taipy/cr
Rated
EXtraordinaire
including:
Love Is Better In The A.M./Your Love Is Rated X
Not Just Another Booty Song/Stormy
It Ain't What You Do (It's How You Do It)

(Continued from Page 1)
it prqceeds to the state board.
"After that," Wheeler said, "I
think it goes to court."
IF THE canvassers do certify
the election, the loser has six
days to file a petition for a re-
count.
Both candidates s a i d they
would call for a recount immedi-
ately if the results were not in
their favor. A candidate request-
ing a recount would be charged
five dollars for each precinct re-
counted. Ann Arbor has 67 pre-
cincts. A c o m p 1 e t e recount
would cost $335.
"We won't have any problems
getting the money," Belcher
said.
A RECOUNT differs from the
work of the canvassers. They
only re-tally vote sheets, while
a recount involves a re-tallying
of all votes cast.
"I'm optimistic," Wheeler said

early last night. "I just want to
wait and see what the heck:
happens."
According to Weiss, all voting
machines have been locked in
their regular storage spaces
since the election's end to pre-
vent tampering.
DURING THE 1975 election, a
controversy arose over several
voting machines which had not.
been impounded following the
election. Although fraud was
suspected, it was never con-
firmed.
If the results of the canvas-
sers' review had been a tie,
the candidates would have set-,
tled the election by drawing lots
in what is commonly called
"God casts the deciding vote."
A portion o fthe city charter al-
lows candidates to flip a coin,
draw straws, or choose numbers
to determine the winner.
LATE LAST evening, it was
reported that tags on a voting,

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TEDDY
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You Can t Hide From YourselIf Somebody Told Me
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The More I Get, The More I Want
PZ 34390 The millon-selling lead
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PZ 344187 Funk oes far out as
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Belcher

remaining two candidates.
In 1975, the first tally showed
Stephenson the winner by 2,984
votes. Human Rights Party can-
didate Carol Ernst, who re-
ceived only 3 148 votes, was
dropped. After several weeks of
re-tallying votes Wheeler was
declared the winner, 14,670 to
14,559, on the strength of the
second-choice votes on Ernst
ballots.
Although Republicans later
filed a suit charging that the
preferential voting system was
not in accordance with the state
constitution the system was
ruled legal.
Ann Arbor voters repealed the
system in April, 1976.
Interesting facts
The city of Troy fell to the
Greeks after a siege lasting 10
years, in 1200 B.C.
The rhinoceros' name comes
from the Greek words meaning
"nose" and "horn."
The College of William and
Mary was chartered in Virginia
in 1692
Benjamin Franklin is credit-
ed with having ground the first
bifocal lens in 1760.
Richard Hoe developed the
rotary printing press in 1847.

PG 34401 Johnnie Taylor, the un-
disputed king of R&B who gave us
the incredible smash hit, "Disco
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dinaire," his new album which is
guaranteed to be a knockout!

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"THE JACKSONS"
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THE MANHATTANS
IT FEELS SO GOOD
including:
It Feels So Good To Be Loved So Bad
We Never Danced To A Love Song/It's You
Let's Start It All Over Again/I Kinda Miss You
(

I

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eanaaaa 6aeaaz esavcw _

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PC 34450 The masters of satin
soul offer us their latest collection of
beautiful ballads and "can't stop
from dancing' music.

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I A Public Service of this , o
newspaper & The Advertising Council
W6re
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f
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--
E
t

machine in one precinct had ac-
cidentliy been switched between
the Socialist Human Rights Par-
ty (SHRP) and the Libertar-
ian Party, giving Wheeler 15 ad-
litional votes. But sources at
City Hall denied the report.
Controversy also surrounded
Wheeler's first election. In
April 1975. he defeated incum-
bent Republican James Stephen-
son by only 121 votes under the
city's preferential ballot system.,
The system allowed voters to
number the candidates on their
ballot in order of preference.
Candidates receiving the low-
est number of votes were drop-
ped and their second and third
choice votes distributed to the

8:30-5:00 P.M.

TUESDAY,,APRIL 12

1

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