100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 03, 1977 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sunday, April 3, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page THree

DAILY DIGEST APRIL 3,1977

I

f

From Wire Service Reports

International
Supersonic
Concorde
PARIS - French President
Valery Giscard d'Estaing yes-
terday stepped up his campaign
to persuade the Carter Admin-
istration that it must allow the
supersonic airliner. Concorde a
fair landing trial in New York.

Discard

Birth control I
EW in India
NEW DELHI, India - In the
wake of a political furor over
compulsory sterilization, India's
new government pledged yes-
terday to curb the nation's birth
rate through traditional, volun-
tary contraceptive methods.
But Health Minister Raj Na-
rain emphasized that lowering
India's annual birth rate, esti-
mated at 14 million, remains a
top priority of the government
of Prime Minister Morarji De-
sai.
India's population of 620 mil-
lion, nearly three times that of
the United States, lives in a
area less than a third the size
of the 50 American states.
"We are totally against, fun-
damentally against compulsory
sterilization," Narain told re-
porters. He said the government
will increase distribution of free
contraceptives and encourage
Indians to have small families
for their economic well being.
Narain also said the govern-
ment was ending the 20-year
policy of paying cash to those
who undergo sterilization. "This
is a bribe," he said.
Former Prime Minister Indira
Gandhi began the sterilization
campaign shortly after she sus-
pended civil liberties in June
1975. But it generated bitter op-
positton in a culture that vene-
rates large familieshand was a
major reason for her govern-
ment's defeat at the polls last
month.
During the campaign, federal
and state administrations de-
vised elaborate incentives and
penalties to convince Indians to
undergo sterilizationafter hav-
ing two or three children.
They included denying free
medical care, subsidized hous-
ing, and pay raises to couples'
who refused to submit to sterili-
zation after three children.
Rebels dead
in Zaire
KINSHASA, Zaire - The chief
of staff of Zaire's armed forces
said yesterday that his troops
have killed Russians, Cubans
and Portuguese among the rebel
force that invaded Shaba Prov-
ince on March 8.
"We have not taken any of
them prisoner," said Lt. Gen.-
Bumba Moasso, expressing re-
gret - with a broad grin -j
that he could not display the
bodies in the Zaire capital which

He emphasized the political
importance of the Concorde is-
sue in a 90-minute discussion
with Secretary of State Cyrus
Vance, who stopped over here
on his way home from abortive
armslimitation talks in Moscow.
Vance later left for Washing-
ton.
"President Giscard d'Estaing
raised the question with respect
to the Concorde and I said I
would discuss the matter with
President Carter on my return,"
Vance told reporters after the
meeting at the Elysee presiden-
tial palace.
"It's not just a technical prob-
lem," President Giscard d'Es-
taing's spokesman said after the
~meeting. "It is a political prob-
lem which will have inevitable
political consequences if New
York refuses Concorde landing
rights."
The Anglo-French airliner is
undergoing a 16-month landing
trial at Washington's Dulles air-
port but has not been allowed
to begin a similar trial period
at New York's Kennedy airport.
Other topics raised during the
meeting were Vance's Kremlin
talks, the dangers of the nuclear
proliferation and the rapidly
changing situation in Africa.

lies 1,200 miles from the fight-
ing near the key copper mining
center of Kolwezi.
He said the whites killed gen-
erally fought bare to the waist
in the rear of the rebel infan-
try. He said most of them were
instructors or technicians em-
ployed to fire sophisticated
ground to ground missiles of
Soviet origin. Bumba declined
to estimate how many whites
had been killed. Asked to ex-
plain how he could be certain
that they were Russian, Cuban
or Portuguese, he replied:
"They support Angolan Presi-
dent Agostinho Neto, don't
they?" He declined to elaborate,
but reporters assumed it was a'
reference to Russian and Cuban
support for the Marxist-oriented
regime in, neighboring Angola
which has given the rebels cru-
cial material and moral back-
ing.
Bumba, who was protected by
an eight-man bodyguard carry-
ing submachine guns, pledged
that government forces would
soon launch an all-out offensive
to drive the invaders out of
the country. He did not ex-
plain how they would overcome
the handicaps of shortage of
fuel and spare parts and hos-
tility from the local population
in western Shaba Province.
Most of the invaders are Lun-
da tribesmen of Shaba origin
who have lived in Angolan exile
since the collapse of the late
Moise Tshombe's Shaba Katan-
ga secession in 1963. Tshombe
Was the paramount chief of the
Lunda tribe.
Egypt to ask
for U.S. arms
WASHINGTQN - Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat is ex-
pected to ask for U. S. arms
and for a detailed explanation
of the administration's Middle
East peace plans in his talks
this week with Carter since his
inauguration, Sadat is known to
be determined to probe Carter's
concept of a "homeland" for'
Palestinian refugees as well- as
"defensible borders" for Israel.
Sadat also wants American
weapons -"lots" of Northrop
F5 fighter planes and TOW
antitank missiles, he said re-
cently. Deliverycould begin a
"retooling" of Egyptian forces
'along U. S. lines..~
Sadat is scheduled to meet
Carter tomorrow and Tuesday.
Egypt already receives French
fighter - bombers and French
and British helicopters and
technology. According to Israeli
sources, the Soviets have con-
tinued to supply M1G21 fight-
ers, anti-aircraft missiles and
tanks despite a general impres-
sion that they were caught off
in a rift growing out of the 1973
Middle East war.
The Israels contend the equip-
ment is "laundered" through
East Germany, Czechoslovakia,
North Korea and other Com-
munist countries.
All Egypt is known to have
In 1935, the Soil Conservation
Service was established as a
permanent unit of the Depart-
ment of Agriculture for the con-
trol and prevention of soil ero-
sion.
Russian casualties in World
War I totaled 9,250,000 between
1914 and 1917.
1214 S. Uniiersity
Theatre hone 668-6416
COMPLETE SHOWSTODAY

PONTIAC, Michigan -
tentially fatal botulism

Po-
food

State

Sadat

received from the United
States are three C130 military
transports. The Egyptian mili-
tary and Sadat would like to
begin a transition to U. S. arms
with the sort of subsonic planes
and anti-tank missiles already
supplied by Washington to other
moderate Arab states.
He was preceded here by Is-
raeli Prime Minister Yitzak
Rabin and will be followed in
late April by King' Hussein of
Jordan. Carter plans to see Sy-
rian President Hafez Assad in
Europe in early May and will
receive Prince Fahd of Saudi
Arabia here toward the end of
the month.

poisoning has been confirmed
in 21 Pontiac residents at four
hospitals in what health author-
ities were calling one of the
worst botulism out-breaks ever
in the United States.
Four of the victims were in
critical but stable condition, the
rest were listed as fair, and at
least a dozen other persons
were being held in hospital for
observation, according to the
Oakland County Department' of
Health.
Fourteen suspected cases of
botulism poisoning had been re-
ported by Friday afternoon and
the malady was confirmed and
the figure rose to 21 by yester-
day, according to Ralph Miller
of St. Joseph Mercy Hospital,
The contamination has been
traced to canned jalapeno pep-
pers used by a small, but popu-
lar Mexican restaurant in Pon-
tiac.
Special serum to treat the
victims of botulin toxin has
been flown here by the Center
for Disease Control in Atlanta.

A CHOICE FOR A CHANGE!
RENT CONTROL NOW
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION FOR JOBS
SUPPORT A.F.S.C.M.E. and GEO
CONTROL THE POLICE

- -
Botulism
cases rise

THE MICH1GAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVII, No. 146
Sunday, April 3, 1977
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone ?64-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a ii y Tesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
There are more sheep than
people in Australia and the
country produces about a third
of the world's wool.

JOIN THE DAILY STAFF

YASUJIRO OZU's 1960
LATE AUTUMN
"I'm happy as I am," says a young woman to her mother, refusing
to marry in this vatuation on Ozu's theme of parent-child rela-
tionships as they go through small, undramatic but significant
cruises. The girl marries, of course, and her mother is left to live
alone. Full of soft affectionate humor. Japanese with subtitles.
CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
7:00 & 9:15 Admission $1.25
JEAN-LUC GODARD's 1966
TWO OR THREE THI NGS
A tuy fI KNOW ABOUT HER.
A study of prostitution, both on a personal, industrial, and political level.
Often exhibiting Godard's own special brand of humor, this film ranges
from the adventures of a young French housewife prostitute, to the contem-
plation of the universe within a coffee cup. Sometimes maddening, but bl-
togther, an important film by one of the world's most intriguing film-
makers.
TONIGHT AT ANGELL HALL-AUD. "A"
E7 & 8:30 Adm. $125

Diana Leigh Slaughter
for Mayor
William D. Wilcox
1st Ward

4 9

SOCIALIST HUMAN RkGHTS PARTY
Pd. Pol. Ad

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
(v;!,.":Mmrm " .J'Sem rr"!"l "ti s. ,.pG lq;s a ,." -r : rm;Je'Sm . ".tp+."A :{.i ?:}{ r ? " ";:S:"":i"" %r.?r

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication, of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding' publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
Sunday, April 3, 1977
DAY CALENDAR
WUOM: Options in Education,
"Life as an Educational Process," 1
p.m.
Music School4 Jazz Band, Hill Aud.,
8 p.m.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 S.A.B. - 763-4117
Camp Sequots, MI. Coed. Will in-
terview Wednesday, April & from
9:30 to 3. Openings include water-
front (WSI), riding (western), arch-
ery, riflery, camp craft, arts/craft.
Register by phone or in person.
Silverman Village, Det. Fresh Air
Society, Handicapped camp. Will in-
terview Monday./Thursday; April
4/7 from 11 to 4. Openings include
general counselors, waterfront
(WSI), Arts/Crafts, maintenance.
Register in person or by phone.
Camp Oakland, MI. Handicapped.
Will interview Monday, April 11
from 9 to 5. Openings include gen.
counselor, arts/craft, waterfront

(WSI), nurse, program dir. Register
by phone or in person.
Good Humor 'Corp. Det.: Will in-
terview Monday, April 11 from 9 to
5. Good money - be outdoors all
day. Opportunities in other cities
also - Chicago, Baltimore, Phila.,
Pittsburgh, and others. Register by
phone or in person.
Camp Maplehurst, MI. Coed: Will
interview Tuesday, April 12 fror0 1
to 5. Must be 20 or older. Openings
include riding (eastern/western),
nurse, tennis, sports, sailing, scuba,
photography, drama. Register inper-
son or by phone.
Monday, April 4, 1977
DAY CALENDAR
WUOM: Anthony Downes, "Cities
in the Year 2000," 10 a.m.
Physics/Astronomy: E. H. Levy,
"The Generation of Astrophysical
Magnetic Fields," 2038 Randall Lab.,
noon; M. Cohen, California Institute
of Technology, "Non-linear Trans-
port in Pinned Charge Density Wave
System," 1041 Randall Lab.; L. Suss-
kind, Yeshiva and Tel Aviv Univer-
sities, "Breakdown of Bjorken Scal-
ing, 2038 Randall Lab., 4 p.m.
Ctr. Human Growth/Development:
"Human Sexuality," Herbert Leider-
man, Stanford Medical School, "Sex-
ual Disorders and their Treatment."
Aud. 4, MLB, 4 p.m.
Music School: Opera - chamber
performance, Mozart's "Cosi fan
tutte," SM Recital Hall, 8 p.m.

Fol8L

a

j

Pd. Pol. Adv.

I

ANN ALIA0U FILM CC-CI
Tonight in the Modern Languages Building
Sunday, April 3
DESIGN FOR LIVING

1

X3 005 OW19 -q- O
oili
April 4-11
1. All Applications Taken from April 4 Through April 11, 1977 Will Receive Equal
Consideration With Applications Taken June 6-13 for FALL BOOK RUSH. A Lot-
tery System will be used for these applications to determine hiring order.
II. The Cellar Will take applications at later times than indicated in (1); however,
subsequent applications will be placed in hiring order by Date of Application,
and they will receive priority after those taken in (1)
Ill. Former Rush Employees in good standing Need Not Reapply for FALL RUSH
and will receive top priority over all other applicants.
IV. All applicants hired for FALL RUSH will be notified by phone or mail later in
the summer. Rush employees hired to work in August should expect to work
through and beyond registration. HOWEVER, all rush jobs are, unfortunately,
only temporary. Starting pay is $2.70 per hour.
V. Permanent positions which may open up after Rush will be filled by employees
who worked FALL RUSH. Post-Rush hiring is done departmentally, on the basis
of the employee's Rush performance and their availability for the unified hours.
VI. After SEPTEMEBER 30, 1977, all unused applications will be thrown away.
iTherefore, applicants must reapply for each future rush that they wish to work.
ABSOLUTELY NO APPLICATIONS WILL BE UPDATED OR KEPT ON FILE FOR
FUTURE RUSHES.

I

l

(Ernst Lubitsch, 1933)

7 & 10:30-MLB 4

Discussions of Ernst Lubitsch are all too often inclined to pay lip
service to his famous and delightful "touch," which generally
obscures the fact that he was a director of considerable scope and
depth. Happily, Lubitsch was at his best in this adult comedy
about a woman who, unable to decide which of two men she loves
the more, decides to live with them both. The witty screenplay
was written by Ben Hecht. "Lubitsch was a giant . . his talent
and originality were stupefying!" Orson Welles, Frederic March,
Gary Cooper, Miriam Hopkins.
AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY

I

GREENSH IELDS
OUTSPOKEN AND TO THE POINT
SOMETHING DIFFERENT-NOT THE
SAME OLD CONSERVATIVE POLITICS

I

(Joseph von Sternberq, 1931)

8:45 ONLY-MLB 4

Dreiser's monumental novel, adapted by von Sternberg, is a
similarly monumental film. Clyde Griffiths Is an unsure young
man in love with a rich girl, but unable to Creak away from the
factory girl he seduced. Von Sternberg's deft treatment of a tense
murder trial causes this film to leave its mark on American
cinema. Truly a classic. Philip Homes, Sylvia Sydney.
Admission: $1.25 single feature
$2.00 double feature
An.ar%%, . A....I A :- lAu

* University d or ms are a
holdover from 19th Century
Victorianism (in loco paren-
tis )
* Building codes are based in
many cases on conditions and
construction methods of 50.
years ago.
" Feminist studies show that
government controlleddand/or
funded schools and day-care
centers tend to f a s t e r the
same sexist values that we
have been fighting.

DEMOCRAT: The University
should be m a de to provide
more housing.
DEMOCRAT: Hire more in-
spectors and e n f a r c e the
building codes.
DEMOCRAT: People can start
their own day-care centers but
t h e y should be government
funded.

TODAY at 1-3-5-7:05-9:10
FOUR
ACADEMY AWARDS
RFBT ACTOR-Pet-r Finch

UNFORTUNATELY, WE HAVE ABSOLUTELY NO JOBS AVAILABLE
CURRENTLY OR FOR THE SUMMER. SORRY, THESE ARE RUSH JOB
OPENINGS ONLY.

I

I

._ ... . .. _ ,_ ...... 1

0

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan