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April 02, 1977 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Oege SE

THE MICHIGAN DRILY

oturday, Apm Z, i y I I

*O§O S~. THE MICHIGAN DAILY ~oturdOy, April 4 I VI I

PUT A STUDENT
ON CITY COUNCIL

DEFEND BIG TEN TITLE

Thinclads

HOUSING
No new student housing has
been built in e i g h t years.
Since there is a visible need
for it, we must clear the way
for developers to build new
housing. This w o u I d bring
down the high cost of rents.
Val iaskiewicz
CITY COUNCIL, 1st Ward

I

By ERNIE DUNBAR
Michigan's basketball team
may have found sour grapes
when they visited Lexington,
Kentucky two weeks ago, but
the Wolverine track team is
hoping their participation in to-
day's Kentucky Relays proves
more fruitful.
Among Michigan's competi-
tion in the non-scoring meet will
be Kentucky State, host Ken-

For
PD. POL. AD

p.

tucky, Ball State, Cincinnati,
Eastern Kentucky, Purdue and
Louisville.
RUNNING IN THEIR first
outdoor meet of the season, the
thinclads begin defense of their
1976 Big Ten Championship,
starting two weeks earlier than
in past years.
"Last year we felt that we
went down to our first meet
and we weren't really prepar-
ed," said Michigan coach Jack
Harvey. "We felt that if we
added a couple of more weeks
to the season we could also get
in some more individual races,"
he added.
"Last year we spent the
whole month of April running
relays and then we really only
had two weeks in which to get
individual races and get seed-
ing times for the Big Ten
meet," Harvey said.
Even though the meet is the
initial competition of the out-
door season, Harvey said he's
not putting much emphasis on
the performances.
"We're really low-keying this
rneet," commented Harvey.
"It's basically just a chance
to get outside and run."
HOWEVER, DUE to a Big
Ten ruling, Harvey will be able
to take only 28 members of his
The
Cross Eyed
LA...

egrn
team.
"It hurts a team like Michi-
gan," said Harvey. "We've got
a team where we've develop-
ed the whole thing around this
big idea of a large team, and
28 definitely hurts us.
"I can't think of any other
reason they (the Big Ten)
would limit it than for financial
reasons," he added.
As is the custom in big re-
lay meets, most of the thin-
clads will -be participating in
more than one event,
Namath waived
Joe Namath's career with
the New York Jets officially
ended yesterday when the
NFL team announced that it
would not pick up his $450,000
contract for another season.
The 33-year-old quarterback
was given his freedom in or-
der to negotiate a contract
with the Los Angeles Rams.
-AP

quest
also compete in the 1500 meter
run.
MICHIGAN'S indoor world
record sprint medley relay
team of James Grace, Doug
Hennigar, Jeff McLeod, and
Andy Johnson will try their
hand at the outdoor version.
Johnson sees additional action
beforehand, running with Dave
Furst in the 880-yard run.
Grace will also try the 200
meter dash, while McLeod goes
in the 400 meter dash and Hen-
nigar races in the 100 meter
dash.
ONE ADDITION to the Michi-
gan threat will be All - Ameri-
can running back Rob Lytle.
He'll compete in the 100 met-
ers plus the 440-yard relay.
"He was a little reluctant to
go (.to Kentucky) because he
didn't feel like he was in very
good shape," said Harvey. "He
wants to run the whole outdoor
season, so we decided if he
wants to run the whole season
he should get into it right
away."
While Michigan should be
competitive in each of the re-
lays, Harvey doesn't feel the
Wolverines will be running at
top strength, due to the short
rest periods in between events.
"We're running them (the
relays) as strong as we can,"
said Harvey, "but they aren't
what we'd call our "A" team
relays. We're running guys in
individual events and then
bringing them back to run on
relays. Everybody's doubling
even with the short rest per-
iod they'll have."
LR Y SEEN

Speed, strength
typify ruggers
By GEOFFREY OLANS
The rugby season is once again in full swing, and with an
impressive 18-0 victory over Windsor already, the University
of Michigan looks at the immediate future with much op-
timism.
In the past three seasons of play Michigan has compiled
an 27-4 record. During this period they became the fir.st
Michigan team ever to wn the Traverse City 15-a-side
Rugby Tournament.
In addition, the Blue also made an impression by
placing second in last year's Big Ten tournament.
This year the Wolverines have been asked to represent
the State of Michigan in the Mid-America Cup. This, to-
gether with an imposing schedule may seem threatening.
If there is a threat, however, it's met with optimism.
When asked of his season's expectations, Rory O'Connor,
both a co-ordinator and an outstanding player, replied, "to,
go undefeated."
The Michigan Rugby club, unlike most American ama-
teur teams who come on strong in only certain facets of
the game, the Wolverines are multi-dimensional.
"We have the balance of a quick backfield and a
strong bunch of forwards," said O'Connor. He later re-
marked that the real strength of the team lies in its
technique.
Also O'Connor noted that the team abounds in talent.
Standouts among the forwards include Mike Malenfant and
his brother Jim, Angelo Tocco, Rory O'Connor, Keith Stone,
and Tom Raboine.
In the backfield both Cleland Child, scrum half, and Dave
Weber, fly half and captain, made the Michigan select side.
Also, centers Bill Conway and Bill Chung have gained re-
spect as well as fullback Dan Gulek.
Today, Michigan squares off against the Cincinnati Wolf-
hounds in what may prove to be an assessment of Mich-
igan's- ability. Cincinnati ended last season ranked second
in Ohio out of 32 teams. Ohio is one of the most competitive
rugby states in the Mid-West.
With potential on their hands, the Michigan Rugby club
has the one goal of actualizing it this season.

BIG TEN steeplechase cham-
pion Greg Meyer will run his
specialty along with Bruce Mc-
Gee in the 3000 meter event.
Meyer joins Jack Sinclair,
Dan Heikkinen and Bill Dona-
kowski in the four-mile relay,
which is figured to be one of
the team's strongest events.
The Wolverines' other 'strong
event should be the two-mile
relay where Greg Thomas,
Steve Elliott, Tim Thomas,
and Jim Baumgartner take on
the field.
Elliott and Greg Thomas will
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Nettei
by LJSA ALLMENDINGER
"This is the beginning of a
rivalry in the Big Ten," said
Michigan's w o m e n' s tennis
coach John Atwood.
"This" refers to the North-
western-Michigan match up to-
day, which should prove to be
one of the women's toughest sea-
son contests.
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BOTH SCHOOLS have under-
gone major changes, not only in
their women's tennis programs,
but also in their women's ath-
letic departments. With the ad-
dition of women's athletic direc-
tors at both universities, the wo-
men have full schedules in many
sports.
But, the tennis program at
both schools has made the big-
gest turn around.
"When I came here a year
ago, Northwestern coach June
Booth said, "I coached ten nice
girls but they couldn't play ten-
nis. The kids never won a
match."
"We had one thing . .. zero.'

OF

S. University near Washtenaw
7694744

ANN ARBOR ART ASSOCIATION
1 117 W LIBERTY
APRIL 3rd
./ 10 am. to 5 pm.

We were at the bottom of the
Big Ten."
But, this fall, Booth's squad
had a 5-5 record. Her Wildcats
swept Wisconsin and all of a
sudden the Northwestern team
came into the spotlight.
"NO ONE in the Big Ten
aside from Michigan would play
us until we beat Wisconsin, then
everyone wanted us on their!
schedule."
Despite the big improvement
in her team's status, Booth isn't
expecting to take it all this year,
but she does have two ranked
players. Aimee Conlan is nation-
ally ranked and fills the number
one spot on the team. Clair
Roehn in the third slot has asec-,
tional ranking in Texas and has
played in national tournaments
all summer.
Behind the talent of Conlan
and Roehn, the Wildcat spring;
season has been a successful
one. They traveled to Kentucky
and returned to Evanston 4-0.
Now, they face Michigan.
Michigan is the reigning Big
Ten Champion. They beat Ohio
State, the toughest league oppo-
nent, in Columbus during the
fall, and have been improving
ever'since.
A BIG PART of this improve-
ment is due to the new tennis
program and the enthusiastic
coaching of John Atwood.
When asked abput his chances
against this Northwestern team,'
he replied, "Don't count them
out. They will be a strong com-
petit#r."
Atwood thinks highly of the
Northwestern t e a m, although
Wildcat coach Booth summed it
up this -way, "Michigan is a

OPEN
613

10-MI DNIGHT
E. Liberty

P'

I

BUy
Y

A

YERO

I

'Cats
year ahead of us and they have
much more depth."
The two schools should de-
velop a big rivalry in the next
few years. Both schools have
money for tennis scholarships
and coaches are taking advant-
age of it by recruiting for next
year.
ALTHOUGH BOOTH doesn't
expect to finish better than fifth
or sixth in the Big Ten, both At-
wood and Booth think North-
western will be a power next
year.
Today's match will tell the
story though. It begins at 2 p.m.
at the Track and Tennis Build-
ing and the line ups tentatively
look like this:
In the one and two singles
positions, Northwestern p i t s
Aimee Conlan and Nolan Julia
against Michigan's Kathy Kar-
zen and Ann Kercher.
Bev Tuite and Micki Perket
will be in the fourth and fifth
singles slots for the Wildcats
while Barb Sheldon, last year's
number one player, and Debbie
Rentschler fill the bill for the
Blue.
In the sixth singles spot, Ann
Yoshidi meets Jan Karzen a
Wolverine co-captain.
IN DOUBLES action, Sheldon
and Karzen are matched against
Northwestern players C o n 1 a n
and Roehn in the first doubles
position.
Northwestern's Julia and Tuite
face Rentschler and Kercher
while Michigan players Melinda
Fertig and Clair Crosby meet
Perket and Stacy Miller.
B o t h squads have 1 a d d e r
matches scheduled so there
could be some last minute
switches made in the line ups.
Regarding the outcome, Coach
Atwood is quietly optimistic
while Booth says her team will
give it everything they can.
"We're the underdogs fighting
from the bottom up."
Briggs named
captain of
wrestling team
The Michigan wrestling team
selected junior Karl Briggs as
captain for the 1977-78 season,
yesterday. Briggs succeeds sen-
ior Mark Johnson who captained
the team for the past two sea-
sons.
"I just can't believe it,"
said the elated Briggs. "It is
a great privilege to be cap-
tain."
Briggs just completedhis fin-
est season as a Wolverine, com-
piling an 18-9 season record. The
142 pounder from Linwood fin-
ished fourth in the Big Ten and
qualified for the nationals.
-Daily Sports
UNIYERSITY
SHOWCASE
PRODUCTION
BINGO

I

1111

Just fill in and bring to Student Publications Bldg., 420 Maynard,
behind Student Services and Betsy Barbour Hall. Price is $11 .00 'til
April 1, $12.00 thereafter . . . $1.00 extra for mailing.
Lots of Rose Bowl fun!! Woody and Bo at OHIO!
NnAme ______
Ann Arbor Add ress _______

III

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