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March 30, 1977 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PalE Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, arc. 30, 197-1

Pa~c Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY We~esday, March 30, 1971

El

NOW!
SAME DAY COLO
In By 10:00 A.M.-Out B
Quality Photofinish
Competitive Pr
Open Until 6:0
8 Monday, Noon Sa
SUN PHO
3180 PACKARD-97
2 Blks. E. of Pla

R PRINTS
y 5:00 P.M.

SHS faculty blasts
department review

DEADLINE FOR COMMITTEES TODAY

Students:

Have

a

seat

ing at (Continued from Page 1)
program improvements have
ices been made since the 1973 re-
view, SHS faculty are upset that
10 P.K no staff members were able to
*N e read the original report. Sharf
turday said he did not see the 1973
report until last January, one
month after Medical School
ITO Dean John Gronvall and the Ex-
ecutive Committee voted to
3-0770 dump SHS in 1978.
tt -In a prepared statement to
the Daily, Gronvall said such
reviews, like the 1973 report,
are conducted confidentially
under the auspices" of the Med-
ical School's Executive Commit-
i j ~ tee. The 1973 report findings
were shared with the SHS fac-
j }cts ulty in 1974, he added.
1 l J fSHS faculty have formulated
a list of three possible alterna-

Daily Classi
Get Resu

tives that relocate the program
outside the Medical School. They'
are:
-creation of an independent
center under the Academic Af-
fairs office, similar to programs
like the Center for Human
Growth and Development.
-transferal of the program to
the School of Education.
-either relocating under the
Institute for Mental Retardation
and Related Dissabilities or un-
der the Center for Human
Growth and Development.
Before 1969, SHS was located
in the Literary College (LSA).
The LSA Executive Committee
rejected a proposal to reabsorb
the program last Jan. 20.
SHS 1 o s t its accreditation,
which was provisionally restored
after two appeals, when the
American Board of Examiners
in Speech Pathology and Audio-
logy examined the program last
spring, Gronvall said.
The accreditors were concern-
ed with what they considered
an unstable administrative struc-
ture within SHS, according tot
Sharf. The program stemmed
from the Medical School's fail-
ure to name a permanent direc-
tor and clinical director, he
added.
Sharf has been acting director
for three years.
SSHS was "not a program es-
sencial to the central mission of
the Medical School," Gronvall
stated. "The program's qualityI
and the lack of sufficient re-
sources needed to improve it
were ited as reasons for recom-
mending its closure."

By LINDA BRENNERS
You may not be seeing a
repeat of the 1960s - with its
building takeovers, flag burn-
ings, and other demonstrations-
but students are once again get-
ting involved in University af-
fairs, according to Larry Pul-
kownik of the Personnel Inter-
viewing Committee (PIC).
Pulkownik points out that 100
student applicants are fighting
to be placed in only 40 openings
on University advisory boards.
THE PIC, a committee of the
Michigan S t u d e n t Assemblyh
(MSA), has the task of deciding(
who gets on what body.
"Less than a year ago, we'
couldn't fill all the slots on the
committees. Now we can be se-
lective and get the best possible+
people to get involved, instead
of just settling for warm bod-
ies," Pulkownik said.
Phil Liner, a gradaute student'
in business administration and
a voting member on the Univer-
sity Budget Priorities Commit-
tee, said that students, faculty
and administrators work togeth-
er to seek solutions to budgetary
problems.
"On this committee, students!
don't play an advocacy role-
it's not 'us versus them.' We all
are integral members of a
group."
AL PETRO, a student member
of the Energy Conservation Task I
Force, said that his objective is
to effect small, but meaningful,'
changes, r..t "change the world

overnight."
Petro said that the task force
originated as an advisory coun-
cil that developed to implement
the recommendations proposed
by students and faculty alike.
"There is input from all levels
and the opinions of the students
coincide with what action has
been taken by the administra-
tion," Petro said.
IN ADDITION to "providing
insight that only we, as students,
can provide," Petro said that
serving on University commit-
tees gives students insight into
the administrative operations of
the University.
It is this give and take process
that is attracting more students
to these groups.
"Students are tired of bureau-
cratic red tape and want to
make the system more respon-
Nursooes

sive to t h e i r needs," said bilily and visibility of student
Blanche Trerice, head of PIC government."
and a member of MSA. Those interested in any o 40
positions currently being offered
IN THE PAST, Trerice said, on various University boards
MSA had to resort to "crony- should take note: today is the
ism" to fill the vacant commit- deadline for filing applications
tee seats. Due to a massive pub- with the PIC.
licity campaign targeted at re-
cruiting "fresh faces," however, Interesting facts
Trerice said, "For the first time
in a long time, it looks like we'll Boston University has one
have to turn people away, we've home football game. It's
got so many applicants." against Holy Cross Oct. 15.
The ability to work effectively
within the administration's "bu- Michigan State's Wolverines
reaucratic web is crucial if any- play their first five 1976 football
thing is to be done and students ' nes at home.
want to make sure that they get
a fair chunk," Trerice empha- Dayton plays seven night
sized. football games this season. The
Scott Kellman, president of first four are at home.
MSA, attributes the resurgence
of student interest in University Hawaii plays all 11 football
affairs to the "increased credi- games at night this season.
atto eys hit"

government 's evidence

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Sponsored by Office of Ethics ond Reliicon)cc

(Continued from Page 1)
O'BRIEN TOLD the 12 jury
members and four alternates
that they will present evidence
that a VA nurse, Bonnie Bates,
and an unidentiifed man dressed
as a doctor and wearing a green
scrub suit may have been pres-1
ent during many of the myster-
ious breathing faliures.i
According to O'Brien, who
gave detailed accounts concern-
ing these persons, Bates was
granted immunity from prose-
cution and now will appear as1
the government's "star wit-
ness."
O'Brien also said they will
delve into the story of Betty
Jakim, a nursing supervisor at
the hospital who allegedly con-
fessed the crimes to her psy-
chiatrist at the University's
Neuro-Psychiatric Institute be-
fore she committed suicide. I
O'BRIEN QUOTED Jakin as
having said, "You'll be sur-
prised in the very end to find out
who did it . .. I believe in the
innocence of these two Filipino
nurses . . . I'm horribly fearful
of the FBI and guilty."
Perez, 32, and Narcisco, 30,
are charged with using Pavulon,
a paralyzing drug to murder
two patients and poison seven
others at the VA hospital during
July and August 1975. They are
also charged with one count of
conspiracy to poison patients.
O'Brien and Detroit attorney
Ed Stein, who also presented'
opening statements, emphasized
they would produce evidence

THEY ALSO charged that the
hospital's poor security meas-
ures and record-keeping make3
it almost impossible to deter-
mine the movements of people
through the hospital during sum-
mer 1975. They added that the
summer is a particularly hectic-
time due to staff changeovers.
Although the VA hospital is
typical of many government run
institutions, characterized by!
much paperwork and an over-
worked staff, O'Brien said, "the
truth is that their record-keep-
ing is atrocious. When there is
a respiratory arrest, they don't
even know who attends to the
patient."
The situation during 1975 was
compounded by the absence of
the hospital's chief of staff, whoI

"THE NATURE of Pavulon is
not understood yet. It's a new
drug," he added.
The two defense attorneys
also charged that the FBI tried
to pressure hospital workers, in
particular, Narciso and Perez,
into confessing to the poisonings.
In addition, Stein said the FBI
"firmed up their case" by hyp-
notizing witnesses.
Threats
reported

that VA hospital administrators "The FBI claims to have done
did not act effectively during the what no hospital in the world
emergency situations a r i s i n g had done - did they find Pavu-
from the series of unexplained lon or do they think they did
respiratory arrests. because that's what the FBI
wanted to find?" Stein asked.

was on leave for six months, ! to A1ei. ine lieratur g
Stein said. lighted Pennington himself, who
WkriW i fnr TUi 3 picn idntial

i i
0-1.) Ulu
yuovc

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OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY EVENINGS UNTIL 9!00

- y
THE DAILY
make
interesting
reading

Bargain
For
Hunters,
CLASSIFIEDS
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to if "
people keep
telling you to
quit smoking
cigarettes
don't listen..
they're

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"In the summer of 1975, no:
one was in charge of that hos-
pital. They appointed someone
else (to replace the chief of
staff) but it was on top of his
other duties - which meant no
one was running the show,"
Stein said.
THE DEFENSE attorneys
also charged that the FBI,
which rarely works either on
murder cases or in a medical
setting, conducted a poor inves-
tigation.
O'Brien said that no reliable
tests had been performed on six
of the patients to determine if
Pavulon actually caused their
breathing failures.

wor ea or ua s presiaenuai
campaign.
"I really don't think it's any
real threat on me, .or, that any-
one's really going to 'hurt me,"
LaClair said. She added that she
thought the calls were probably
made by someone who is "fan-
atically dedicated to his candi-
date, but doesn't know how to
wage a campaign on ideological
grounds. So he's resorting to
threats, instead."
The giant redwood tree, says
the National Automobile Club,
was originally called Palo Colo-
rado or red tree by the Spai -
iards of Don Gaspar de Por-
tola's expedition in 1796.

I

f
"
"

probabl
trit
"_

ly trying to;
ick you
into '.

OLLETT'S
WILL BE CLOSED

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... r ^oi
- yr
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Y.
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f/l.

"" living ""
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*." AMERICAN
CANCER
- SOCIETY

Friday, April,
AND

1st

I!

ti

!'

Saturday, April 2nd
FOR INVENTORY

t ihx di

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.:.. :

iii
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r %
}i
..

p

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T..

ig4r, mir4isgttn DWI

it's a favorable

i

forecast for Miss J
when she ties on a
dirndl-skirted raincoat
of polished polyester
and cotton poplin. . .

I

a

lightweight, nylon-lined
topper that goes daytime
or dress-up with its
full-skirt shape, tucked
FROM OUR yokes and pockets and
topstitched welt seaming.
In a versatile ale color;

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