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March 30, 1977 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
En te rta net_ Wednesday, March 30, 1977 Page ive

t

Ramones

run

amok

By DAVID KEEPS
THE RAMONES, New York's
white - hot frenzy, swoop-
ed down and devastated a
packed to the rafters mob at
Second Chance in their Ann Ar-
bor prenmiere Monday night,
sharing the bill with local fav-
orites, Sonic's Rehdezvous
Band.
Sonic's opened with a chord-

ripping deluge that immediate-
ly blew an amp out of com-
mission and drove hyped-up
scenemakers onto the dance
floor for some updated Detroitj
style strutting.
MC5 legend Fred "Sonic"
Smith, and ex-Rational Scott1
Morgan shared vocal chores
while blasting interwoven pas-
sages of rapid fire psychedelic
pad work and rabbit punching

rhythm guitar - all against the
steady, skull shattering back-
beat provided by bassist Gary
Rasmussen and drum menace,
Scott Asheton.
MORGAN'S raw, bluesy vo-
cals simmered expressively in
band originals like "Dangerous"
- and, in perfect contrast,
"Sonic" Smith growled through
the tough as nails lyrics of fin-

Sonic sizzles
gerpopping numbers like "Step again, repeating only a few,
by Step" and "Let's Do It and the best I might add, of
Again." their numbers in a precision:
The Ramones mounted the timed explosion .featuring su-
stage to a hysterical onrush of perb background vocalizing by
photographers . and dance-Jhap- Dee Dee and blistering, bare-
py ravers -responding with knee to the floor guitar slash-
a letter perfect onslaught of ing by Johnny.,,
their stripped bare musical hy- Undeniably the loudest, fast-
perkineticism. est baud around,. The Ramones
Decked out in ripped jeans, managed, thanks to an excel-
T-shirts, sneakers, leather jac- lent sound system, to be over-
kets and shade, lead sir4ger Joey powering without deafening,
hovered over the mike, in a quite a feat considering the
slouch that merely accentuated spine-vibrating echo effects
his extreme , thinness and used in "California Sun" and
height. Dee Dee's crazed signal calling
After an intermission that was - which sometimes took the
shorter than .the set, The Ra- totally appropriate form of
mones wreaked havoc, once "Em, zwei, drei, vier."

I? (Ilflw'V l1P , i4c dill Ulil

z tit. A/ v==E- tV 5l V 5/9 W.J tUi
By ARTHUR LUBY his sidemen were two guitarists,
a drummer, and a saxophonist
JN THE EARLY sixties the who doubled on flute, sang and
Ramsey Lewis Trio care up played the bongos with his chin
with an instrumental version of when his lip got sore. Lewis
"The In Crowd" which was one himself came equipped with a
of the only popular bits pro- synthesizer, an electric organ
duced by a jazz musician in and a piano, all of which got
close to a decade. Despite his about equal use during the
solid piano work on the brief night.
cut a numoer '1 critics accused
Lewis of going commercial. MOST OF the 90-minute con-
Lewis, though, had no philoso- cert was drawn from Lewis' new
phical hangups about making album Salongo (PC 34173), and
money and. in fact, told his clearly the highlight of the eve-
critics that to him making ning was the performance of the
money was where it was at. title song from the album. The
number stood out primarily be-
Lewis' influence as an econo- cause Lewis decided to take a

u u u +uJv u tuA

i
,' i
,a

Universey Pries
"Les Glacons."

R u eum gets

Ey -NICOLA BINNS
THE UNIVERSITY'S Mu-
sum of Art is now the
proud own'r of its first Monet.
The painting, whose acquisi-
tion was made possible by a
large contribution from Russell
and Andree Ste rims, is entitled
{Les Glacons" aad was pain:-
ed in 1880-1881. Its rich, subile
oil coloraton does justice to the
ice flowing in France's Seine
River.
In an unveiling ceremony held
last Saturday night, museum di-
rector Brett Waller introduced
University President Robben
Fleming and the two removed
the white cloth draped over
the work.
WALLER THEN colored in
the details of the painting's pur-
chase for the benefit of the au-
dience. This began with a letter
from Stearns to the museum
stating that he wished to donate
a 19th century painting to them.
The museum, he explained, had
been very important to him
when he was a student in LSA
in the teens.
"We began immediately to
search," Wailer said, "studying
auction catalogues, visiting
dealers who handled Impres-
sionist paintings and generally
keeping our eyes and ears
open. "
Their efforts were rewarded
after several months when the
museum contacted the posses-
sors of "Les Glacons",

painting, pages of documenta-
tion and a certain amount of
treuidation," continued Walter.
But Stearns had no doubts
about the search group's exper-
tise and the purchase was
made.
After Saturday's unveiling, the
guests - a select mixture of
facalty, alumni, artists, dealers
and students - moved to one
end of the museum's main hall,
where a "French country pic-
nic" had been laid out to match
the atmosphere provided by the
Monet. However, the food was
hardly your average picnic
fare: chicken, artichoke hearts,
salmon mousse and quiche, fol-
lowed by a variety of fine
cheeses and pate. Nor were the
guests dressed for sitting among
a bunch of impressionistic dai-
sies.
"I'M GLAD I wore a blue suit
and not a sports coat,"' avowed
State Senator Jack Faxon.
And Faxon was not the only
one who came slightly unpre-
pared; Fleming himself admit-
ted that this was "one of my
first unveilings of any sort as a
matter of fact."
The general reaction to the
evening and the painting was
good.
"IT'S A really good thing
that this museum has finally
acquired a major nineteenth
century Impressionist painting,"
said Joy Allaun, a 1975 Univer-
sity graduate. "There was a
large gap in that area in light of
the .fact that the museum has
one of the major authorities on
Monet, Prof. Joel Isaacson,'

Monet
she added.
Isaacson called the work "an
atypical Monet", and claimed
that "Michigan (now) has a
painting that people from all
over the United States will come
to see."
However, State Representa-
tive Perry Bullard, also pres-
ent, qualified his pleasure with
the purchase by saying it was
not something "one would
choose to have in their living
room."
THE EVENT followed a ser-
ies of lectures on "perspectives
on collecting" sponsored by
the museum, in which art deal-
ers and auctioneers from New
York came to speak on the
subject.
Perhaps free access to works
by well-known artists like Mo-
net will act as a panacea for
those art students who sensed
from the lectures that art
which was of high value ten
years ago is now out of reach
for all but the richest elite
among collectors.
Sam Houston and 800 Texans
defeated 3,000 Mexicans in 1836,
forcing Mexican Gen. Santa Ana
to sign treaties ending hos-
tilities.
John Elgar built the first iron
steamboat, Codorus, at York,
Pa., in 1825.
[[-

mist is probably more profound
that his influence as a pianist,
but Saturday night's concert at
the Michigan Theater revealed
that he is still a pretty solid
man at the keyboard.
These days. L e w i 'i group
comes in quintet form -or sex-
tet if you count the eectrician
who swrfaced now and then from
in back of the amplifiers. Among'

five or six minute solo during
which he again revealed the
smooth yet soulful piano style
which originally brought him in-
to prominence. His p 1 a y i n g
evoked a number of cries of
"tell it Ramsey" and was gen-
erally so interesting that I won-
dered what he needed the rest
of' those folks for.
The answer to the above ques-

"WE MET with Mr.
for the first time with
tographic transparency

Stearns
a pho-
of the

TONIGHT is
STUDENT NIGHT
STUDENT ADMISSION ONLY 50c
AT
Appearing Thru Friday:
ONCE UPON A TIME
99 -5350 516 E. LIBERTY
6.9 9 9 i 9 9} i+ ,i . 9 9 VA 9 9 l9i l b 9 9L,

UNIVERSITY
SHOWCASE
PRODUCTION
BINGO
by EDWARD BOND
MARCH 30 thru APRIL
8:00 P.M.
Trueblood Theatre
(Frieze Building)
$2.00 admission
PTP Box Office
764-0450

2

}
_

m
"The
MA
Tickets o
10-5 C-
rn. i n

it

A
c;
P

USKET Presents
Music Man"
RCH 31-APRIL 3
Each Evening at 8:00,
unday Matinee at 2:00
OWER CENTER
r-, sale at Power Center from
two hours before each perform-
76 -f 107 or 753-3333:
DOCUMENTARIES
FOREIGN (
(AT 7:00)
PROGRA'M (1895), MAN WITH
AMERA (1928) By Dziga Vertev,
CHANIQUE (f924) By Fernand

EARLY
A LUMIERE
A MOVIE C
BALLET ME

3 2 I

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