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January 14, 1977 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-01-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
rts En te rtc n e n t Friday, January 14, 1977 Page Five

t
ISM

(Aside)

Ann Arbor arts,
throgah not too
jaundiced eyes

Ramp.al

to

J

.L*O IS JOSIMOVICH___ICH_
JANUARY is not one of the most popular months of the year -
it's too cold and snowy and there are .no more holidays for
about three months.
But for an arts critic, January is laden with bliss. At last,
a chance to make public all one's most violent ikes and dislikes
of the previous year! These usually take the form of a list, and
already Americans have been inundated with opiniens on the
"Best of" and "Worst of" 1976 for various creative genres.
While I usually try to avoid foisting my views on the com-
munity, Wednesday's Grammy Award nominations were enough
to set even the most tolerant radio listener's teeth on edge; and
I have always been somewhat of a musical elitist. So I made a
list of my own, and here it is - The 10 Most Revolting. Songs
of 1976:
(1) - Without a doubt, first place goes to "Afternoon De-
light". The perpetrators of this musical monstrosity are known
as the Starland Vocal Band, a previously unknown group which
would have done better to remain that way. "'Skyrockets in
flight; Afternoon delight" is the chorus and the rest is coyly left
to the imaginataion. Get with it, Bill Danoff! Coyness in popu-
lar songs has been passe for practically a decade. Maybe not
though, because this odious piece has been offered a Grammy
nomination.
(2) - There were lots of contenders for this position, but I
finally settled on "Car Wash", the song from the movie of the
same name. This consists mainly of some raucous voices bawl-
ing "Car Wash" and is devoid of both tune and vocal talent. At
least when you're watching the movie you don't have to pay too
much attention to these failures.
(3) and (4) - There were so many new disco songs released
last year that even Newsweek did a cover story on "The Disco
Whirl". Well, "these songs are all right for dancing to, but why
torture every car radio owner with them too? Myself, I'd rather
hear the engine.
Anyway, in this genre the two worst of the year have to be
"Disco Duck" and "Disco Lady". The first is rendered by a
group named, appropriately enough, Rick Dees and his Band
of Idiots. They do a lot of quacking, which keeps them from
saying much. But then, limited vocabulary is typical of disco
songs: "Disco Lady", for instance, simply advises the dancer
to shake "it" in various directions (what "it" is, we can only
guess). Then there's_
(5) - "Shake Your Boodie", which has about the same mes-
sage except that its beat and tune are even more boring, a char-1
acteristic which should make you leap up and exclaim, "Why,
that must be K.C. and the Sunshine Band!" It is, and the lessj
said the better.
(6) - Sixth place goes to that king of kinky kitsch, Elton
John for his duet with Kikki Dee, known as "Don't Go Breakin'
My Heart". The rest of the lyrics go: "I ro'idn't if I tried."
Well, that's fine - who cares? And that teenybopper music is
enough to make my toes curl.
(7) - I'm not sure if the next entry can really be called al
song, since - like "Disco Duck" - It's mostly a collection of
animal sounds. At any rate, "Muskrat Love" may have a nice
tune, but I'm sorry, it's just too cutesy for words; it reminds me
of a pair' of animated love-birds in a .Walt Disney film.
(8) - Here I'll run into some controversy because I'm going
to give eighth place to Anything By Peter Frampton - that idol
of a million screaming teenagers. If this list were based on the
ability to bore, Frampton would go to the top. All he does is
yodel up and down the scale. .
(9) - And if that wasn't controversial, this will be: Paul
McCartney and Wings are fine singers and musicians, but "Let
Me In" is simply inane. The lyrics are dull:
Someone's knocking at the door,
Someone's ringing a bell,
Open the door and let him in.
The tune is catchy and perhaps explains its popularity. I
tend to think that McCartney is trying to put something over in
his fans because now that he's a star he can sing about pain ing
a wall or slipping on a banana peel if he wans to.
(10) - Last place goes to Frank Zappa for a cut from his
latest album, "The Torture Never Stops" As more than one wit
has already commented, the title serves as sufficient description
of the song, which is a tasteless collage of groaning and moaning
backing up some vivid descriptions of slimy dungeons and other
scatological passages.
Well, it's not too early to start thinking about next year's
Revolting nominees. I understand there's something new out
called "Dis' gorilla". It's by someone named Rick Dees . ..

By JIM STIMSON Mozart Festival last fall, andi
IT'S HARD to say anything is one of the finest Mozart in-1
new about Jean - Pierre terpreters. He also strives toN
Rampal, the French flute vir- expand the existing flute re-
tuoso. He is the most widely pertoire by unearthing and re-
recorded and highly acclaimed searching older works.
flautist of the century. R A M P A L ' S appearances
R a m p a 1 and pianist- with pianist Ritter will be no<
harpsichordist John Steele Rit- new experience. When he be-1
ter will appear at Rackham| gan touring in 1946, it was withc
Auditorium tonight., The con- harpsichordist Robert Veyron-1
cert has been sold out since Lacroix, who still accompanies
early September, as well as Rampal occasionally.
Rampal's repeat performance , Like many eminent virtuo-
in March. When Rampal toured sos, .Rampal received flute in-
the states last season it was; struction at a very early age
SRO everywhere. from his father, a flautist In
The "flute king", as Rampal the Marsielles Symphony and
has been termed by some cri- professor at the Marseilles
tics, seems at ease with many Conservatoire. "I am sure that
kinds of music. Friday night's my sonority (tone) is mostly!
concert will open with Baroque the result of listening as a
works by Handel, J. S. Bach child to my father," says Ram-
and C.P.E. Mach, then shift to pal.
modern works by Jin'drich Feld Rampal has recorded al.
and Poulenc. jEbums for over a dozen different
Rampal has also recorded an companies, many of them bud-
album of flute and jazz piano get labels affordable to the av- I
music with Claude Bolling. erage listener. He has recently
Says Rampal of his playing released an album titled Ram-
technlique,"I p~rnrm best pal Plays Bach (you may no-
when I forget my flute is there tice other artists, especially so-
You must never play the loists, who use this same title).
laas though it were only a Rampal plays with the Paillard
flute." This seems a common Chamber Orchestra, and the
trait among virtuosos - the
ability to forget about tech-
niqie aid concentrate on the M ixed Bow/
rn"sic alone.d B
Rampal is more than a vir-
tioso. He conducted the San Now Fc
Francisco Symphony in its j
- ' _ _.- i in . ^

p ayr
record includes Bach's ce-
brated Suite No. 2 in D Minor,
which you heads may recog-
nize from Walter Carlos's
Switched-On Bach II album.
In any event, the Ann Arbor
audience will see Rampal in
a time-tested setting, with key.
board accompaniment and oc-
casional solo work. It should
be one of the good ones.
I if
you
see
newvis
76DA LY

#1

Daily Photo by BRAD BENJAMIN
Beeit dance
Members of the Theater Company of Ann Arbor rehearse last night for a collection of
scenes from "Mad Madonnas", "Bitch You C cazy" and other plays-which they will be per-
forming this weekend for the benefit of the V 1 Nurses' Fund. Tickets for the shows, which
are tonight and tomorrow night at 8 in the T 'ueblood Theater, are $3.
Poet Maxine Kumii graces
Hopwood awards ceremony

ing Leagues
Drming

_...

'u M stylists
at the UNION
"GET STYLED BY
A PRO"
Open 8=30

SIGN UP NOW--UNIUN LANC

PU
nir
read
poetry
anti -
whole
and a

By CIND
L I T Z
ng poetI
a wide co
- inclu
pastoral
bunch of
"funny a

Y HILL some not published in her five
E R prize win- volumes of poetry, described
Maxine Kumin the humorous and the poignant
)llection of her alike. She read from a series of
ding "pastoral, comic poems about her horse,
poems," "a including "Amanda Dreams
Jesus poems," She Has Died and Gone to
cademic poem" Elysian Fields" and "Thinking
1977 Hopwood of Death and Dog Food."

In addition to poetry, Kumin
has published four novels and
19 works of juvenile fiction.
Jud es for the IHopwood
Awards were Prof's. Diane
Be nrtt, Ce-il' Ehv, and Jo'}n
Kolars. Sixty - three contest-
ants entered seventy - three
manuscripts.

- during the

Underclassmen Award presen-
tations Wednesday afternoon in
Rackham Amphitheater.
The Bain - Swiggett, Gutter-
man, and Academy of Ameri-
can Poet Awards were also
presented during the hour-and-
a-half reading.
Kumin's poetry, including

SHE also touched on her long
friendship with the late poet HERE ARE the awards:
Anne Sexton in the elegv -Essay: No awards.
"Snlitting Wood at Six Above,"' .-Fiction: Charles ('iavarini,
which reads, "We'll snlit the $100: Janet Smereck, $100;
nhone bill. It's expensive call- Carrie Smith, $100; Eric Zorn,
ing from the other side . . . $100.
It is the sound of your going t --Poetrv: Amy Pattallo,
drive into hard wood." $100: Barbara Schroeder, $100;
Kristoffer Jacobson. $50; An-
drew Knrtzman, $IM.
--Acadelmv of Amerioa

Cinema Weekend
Friday - Jeremiah Johnson, Nat. Sci. Aud., 7:30 &
9:30; Lost Horizen, Aud. A Angell, 7 & 9; Shampoo, MLB
4, 7 & 9.
Saturday - One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, MLB 3,
7 & 9:15 and MLB 4, 8 & 10:15; A Man For all Seasons,
Aud. A Angell, 7 & 9:15; Some Like it Hot, Nat. Sci. Aud.
7 & 9:45.
Sunday - Two Are Guilty, MLB 4, 7; Boudu Saved
From Drowning, MLB 4, 9:15; A Propos de Nice, MLB 4,
following Boudu; Desk Set, Aud. A Angell, 7 & 9.
All Weekend -- A Star is Born, The Seven Per Cent{
Solution and The Pink Panther Strikes Again; The Movies,
Briarwood (769-87$3); How Funny Can Sex Be, Fifth For-
um (761-9700); King Kong, Michigan (665-6290); The En-
forcer, State, (662-6264); The Clockmaker, Campus (668-
6476); The Silver Streak, Fox Village (769-1300).

Poets Award: James Paul,
X100.
S ai - Swiggett: David Vic-I
tor, ".50.
-M I c h a e 1 Gutterman:
Jeffrey Wine, $100.

Di1ning and Ilis
AN',N ARBW I:J

215 N Main Arm Arbor 661.775$

1

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AM OPEN 6:45
This film is recommended
Theatre Phone 68-64 for mature audiences
AN EXTRAORDINARY FILM!"
--Newsweek
"FINE, PRECISE, VERY
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"ONE OF THE BEST
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ANN ARBOR'S GONE APE OVER 'KONG'!
The most exciting
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event of time.

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HELD OVER-
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SHOWS TONICHT at
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OPEN 6:45
Is He PISSED!

Open I1 a.m.-12:30 a.m. Mon.-Thurs.
11 a.m.-l a.m. Fri.-Sat.
? ~1 p.m-12:30 a.m. Sunday
IIUS
218 ' n t WStv
&rn arbor, mih, 9r j80$ #tcedphorte 665-06
A CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY SPIRITUAL EXPRES-
SION & INQUIRY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SPONSORING IN THE WJMNTER TERM, 1977, MAJOR
PROGRAMS IN THESE AREAS:
EPISCOPAL CAMPUS MINISTRY
This year Canterbury House is committed to working with
students and other people in the University w.io are inter-
ested in new approaches to Christian liturgy. Individual
counseling on personal and spiritual matters is available
by arrangement with the Chaplain.
HAIR-RECONSTRUCTING
VIET NAM
Canterbury House is sponsoring a production on campus
of the Broadway musical HAIR. One dollar fromn each
ticket will go-tod Friendshipment for thereconstruction of
Viet Nam which is necessary because of vast damage re-
maining from the American involvement in the war.
HAIR will be performed in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
from February 17 through 20. Group ticket sales are
available.
C.C. JUNG SEMINARS
A six session course in Basic Principles of Jung's Analyti-
cal Psychology will be offered on Thursday afternoons,
1 to 3 p.m., at the Residential College, room 32, begin-
ning January 20. The Wednesday Evening Jung Seminar
will meet at 8 p.m., at Canterbury House throughout the
term to consider more advanced topics in Jungian psy-
chology,
NATURAL HEALING
Programs on health and healing energy will continue each
Friday evening,beginning with herb tea at 8 p.m. A series
of workshops where people can learn about particular
natural healing approaches will be added to the lecture-
presentations. A booklet on educational resources in the
area of natural healing is being compiled and will be
published anddistributed this term.
GAY ISSUES
Discussions are held each Sunday at 3 p.m. which give
gay people an opportunity to discuss questions- of personal
meaning in their lives. Canterbury House also participates
in efforts to improve the rights of.gay people at the Uni-
versity of Michigan. The Canterbury House staff is avail-
oble to talk with gay people who are experiencing dif-
ficulty, either connected with religion or not connected
with religion.
STUDENT POETRY READINGS
Canterbury House is sponsoring a program this Winter
term to encourage Michigan students to read their own
poetry inpublic readings on campus. This includes help
in arranging locations for readings, small amounts of
money for advertising, and the opportunity to be pub-
lished in the Canterbury House poetry series, copies of
which are available in the Pendleton Arts Information
Center on the second floor of the Michigan Union or -at
Canterbury House.
MORE IDEAS ARE WELCOME
Canterbury House will sponsor additionl programs as
ideas and issues emerge during this year.- Your ideas are
welcome at any time for progrms which address the
spniia ande thicanI neds of nonle at the University of

';

I

I U~ - 77 7~7-1M

'{ xa .... 4A : r. s{ .fi I

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