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March 26, 1977 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-26

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, March 26, 1 77

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday1 March 26, 1977

TIME lauds 'U' law prof
(continued from Page 1) ! which allowed women to play Citing the Nixon-Mitchell ad-
he was presented the Susan B. on male tea sin non-contact ministration as a source for the
Anthony award from the Worn- sports. change, Kamisar said, "The
Anthny wardfro theWom 1 sort. (smell of all the revelations of
en Law Students Association. According to the March 14!sm e IAl didvan w fa
The award honors the professor TIME article, Kamisar has been w the C and what
doing the most for advancement Mitchell did as attorney general
of women in the law school. criticized for being too commer- could give a healthier mood to
Kamisar attributed the award? cial. Questioning the usage of the courts. I think the person-
to two factors -his input in the word commercial, Kamisar nel is important."
hiring two full-time women in- said, "I think they meant I'm He explained that friendship
structors while he chaired the . played a large part in the se-
Faculty Hiring Committee, and too interested in writing things lection of judges. "Until Nixon,
his involvement in a litigation and explaining things. I'm not most Presidents didn't really
concerning women athletes. s y."care much about their appoint-
"They must have thought I! After thinking for a few mo- ees. They just appointed their
tried hard to get women, al- ments, he burst out, "What the friends. That wasn't very good.
though we had ' made several hell is the point of writing things Nixon. for the first time, system-
offers previously to women," he nobody reads. What's the point atically tried to pick everybody
said, trying to play down his of writing? What I'm trying to in terms of a certain ideology."
contribution. "The other women do is translate my scholarship toI
didn't want to come to Ann Ar- the public." "A GUY LIKE (Chief Justice
bor. They preferred California." Is Warren) Burger," he continued,
"I THINK the public has be- "who's established himself as a
KAMISAR GOT INVOLVED in come more interested in the conservative judge on the Fed-
the athletic litigation when two law," he continued. At least eral Court of Appeals. is pretty
women he knew were not allow- the kind of law I'm interested set. Hopefully, we will get dif-
ed to play tennis on their all- in: criminal law, constitutional ferent types of people on the Su-
-male high -school team. He testi- law, and politics. I believe theprm Cot.
fied before the state legislature mood of the country has changed preme Court."
on behalf of new legislation in the last 10 years." Kamisar became reflective:
"The law professor reminds
me of Teyve, the dairyman inj

ARMY GRABS POWER:
Coup ousts

Thai leader

i
i
i

BANGKOK, Thailand ,P) - A
military junta seized power in
Thailand Saturday from the gov-
ernment of Prime Minister Tan-
in Kraivixien, which had been
installed only five months ago
after another military coup.
Radio Thailand, in a brief
broadcast, said Army Gen. Pra-
sert Thammasiri and a revolu-
tionary council had taken con-
trol because "the government
cannot govern the country prop-
erly and the junta felt that it
was necessary to take over in
order to preserve sovereignty
and religion and uphold the mon-
archy."
TANIN, whose removal ap-
peared to reflect disagreement
within the miiltary, was appoint-
ed sprime minister last October
after the armed forces ousted a

three-year-old elected civilian in the country were "deterior-
government. ating."
That coup was led by Adm. The junta's announcement
Sangad Chalawyu and Sangad's said it seized power while the
National Reform Council picked country was under martial law
and would continue it to keep
the 49-year-old Tanin to head peace and order, according to
the new miiltary-based govern- the radio.
ment: I Prasert said, "In order to
Tanin, Thailand's 15th prime avoid panic among the people,
minister, had not been active in all the government forces, com-
party politics and had served posed of the army, navy and air
only one term in the National force, are ordered to remain
Assembly in 1974-75. He is a for- with their units."
mer supreme court judge and
political science professor. THE announcement urged the

crushed by police with at least
26 persons killed and nearly 200
injured.
Thousands of persons were de-
tained for questioning as the
military rulers cracked down on
left-wing movements.
A RULTIGmilitr oiif

'U *dles
Iocal
(ni ro
1Ieaider
Contnuedp fronm Pa~ze 1)

i
i
of

ACCORDING to Radio Thai-
land, the revolutionary junta
seized power at 5:59 q.m. (5:59
p.m. Friday EST) because Tan-
in's military-backed government
could not solve economic and
social problems and conditiLns

people to cooperate with the
junta.
The armed forces seized con-
trol Oct. 6 from the civilian gov-
ernment of Prime Minister Seni
Pramoj following severe rioting
between leftist and rightist uni-
versity students that was

A, ui i~umintary courlcl U1L UUAUL uc1
was established and Tanin was The three additional employ-
named prime minister. es s-spended yesterday will
In a speech last October, Tan- have their preliminary hearings
in announced it would br at with University and AFSCME
least 12 years before demo:racy representatives next week.
would be restored in Thailand.
He said the civilian govern- THE UNION PLANS to chal-
ment established by the armed lenge all disciplinary actions
forces would be backed by the taken by administrators.
military for four years and then Through an agreement with the
it would gradually restore an University, AFSCME can take
elected, two-house parliament any of the cases directly to ar-
over the next eight years. bitration, where it is decided
Thailand, a monarchy under ?whether discipline is actually
King Bhumibol, has had a long necessary.
history of military governments. There will be no more suspen-
Student uprisings led to the sions made by the University,
collapse in 1973 of' the armed since yesterday was the last
forces government headed by day for such announcements to
Field Marshal Thanom Kittaka- be made, according to the
rchorn. who had ruled since he agreement.

Dlead clam halts dam project

DECIDING ON
MEDICAL SCHOOL?
PINFORMATION NIGHT
Monday, March 28 at 7:30 P.M.
AUDITORIUM C, ANGELL HALL

Fiddler on the Roof." Kamisar
said, rummaging through the
papers and books that covered
his desk and pulling out a copy
of the play. He spotted the
quote he was looking for and
paraphrased "On the other
}hand ... on the other hand this,
on the other hand that. That is
the typical law professor."

1

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of the snail darter!

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In a manner like that rare'
three-inch fish that's stopped
work on a multi-million dollar
Tennessee dam, one dead clam
the size of a squashed tennis
ball forced a temporary halt in
a dredging project on the Min-
nesota River.
THE U.S. ARMY Corps of En-
gineers shut down its $281,335
project here Thursday after a
half shell found at the site was
tentatively identified as "lamp-
silis bigginsi," an endangered
species of clam.
The corps decided to resume
dredging today after divers
turned up no other evidence of,
Looking for an1
The program at the Univer
Chapel Hill has an excellen
A distinguished faculty, anc
an innovative curriculum, an
among employers. For addit

the endangered clams, common.
ly called "Higgins Eye."
Malacologist David Stansber-
ry, who was flown to Minneapo.
lis from Ohio State University
in Columbus to study the clam,
said he was unable to make a
positive identification and would
need to make further tests.
DIVERS ARE continuing their
search, and if more clams are
found at the dredging site, the
corps may try to transplant
them to another location, said
Bill Geotz, chief of the corps
construction and operations divi
sion in St. Paul.
Such a project has never beer
tried before but may be pos-
sible, said Del Rasmussen, as
sistant regional director for the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
MBA Program?
rsity of North Carolina at
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LIKE THE snail darter, the
clam has no commercial v'alue.
Work on the $116 million Tel-
lico Dam on the Little Tennes-
see River, more than 95 per cent
completed, remains at a stand-
still following a January cour*
ruling that the snail darter had
to be protected. The Tennessee
Valley Authority plans to appeal
the ruling.

MISA must reform charter
or method of representation

l

succeeded another general in
1963.
With Thanom out, a conscitu-
ent assembly was elected and
drafted'a new constitution that
was approved Oct. 5, 1974, es-
tablishing the return to an elect-
ed civilian government that
could only remain in office three
years.

AFSCME, meanwhile, has
scheduled a general member-
ship meeting for tomorrow after-
noon in order to discuss, for
one, the disciplined strikers.
The University maintains that
those persons being disciplined
were involved in malicious van-
dglism, threats or assaults as-
sociated with the strike.

Planning
Placement
764-7460

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* The Cartter Report on the Leading Schools of Education, Law, and
Business.

By LINDA BRENNERS
The Michigdn Student Assem-
bly (MSA) has until next fall to
either rewrite part of it consti-
tution or change its method of
representation, if it is to con-
form with a recent ruling by the
Central Student Judiciary
(CSJ).
The CSJ has said that the
presence of 17 school and col-
lege representatives is not in
accordance with MSA's birth
certificate, the All Campus Con-
stitution.
THE ARTICLE under fire -
which provides for one voting
representative from each school
and college government - vio-
lates the "equal weight of the
vote" guaranteed in the Assem-
bly's Bill of Rights, CSJ said.
Currently, LSA, with a con-
stituency of 13,000 students, is
represented by a single MSA
member, as is the School ofi
HATHA YOGA
CLASSES
Startnq March 28. 1977
6 WEEKS-$20
Mon. Beginner 7:30-8:43
Tues. Beqinner 7:30-8:45
Thur. Elementary 7:30-8:45
Sat. Children 9:45-10:30
($10)
Sat. Beginner 10:30-11:45
Tauht by Kamalo of
Siddha Yoga Dham
CALL 761-9396
4.

Architecture and Design which
has only 300 students. CSJ has
ruled that this type of distribu-
tion of voting power is malap-
portioned according to the con-
stitution.
Furthermore, CSJ found the
constitution contradicts itself.
For instance, a clause prohibit-
ing any exemption to the "equal
weight" rule is directly follow-
ed by an amendment which ex-
empts representatives from that
rule.
THE ASSEMBLY basically
has two alternatives at its dis-
posal.
In order to maintain its pres-
ent status, MSA, by approval of
the student body; can delete or
replace the "equal weight of the
vote" clause.
MSA presidnt Scott Keller-
man said that most students are
"probably" confused about the
malapportionment issue and
would not vote to strike the
equal weight clause from the
constitution.
But, Kellman added, "If stu-
dents don't vote to strike that
clause down, MSA will, in effect
become an LSA government."
He explained that the 17 school
and college representatives
would be removed from the As-
sembly, leaving 18 members
elected at large.
H I S T O R I C A L L Y,
Kellman says, the vast major-
ity of those seats have been
filled by students in LSA. Con-

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LI~~

ALIYAH
If you have recently considered
making Israel your home or if the
idea has been germinating in the
back of your mind, contact the
Israel Aliyah Center. Learn about
special benefits available to new
immigrants, as well as facts about
employment, professional
retraining, education, housing,
etc. Ask about financial
assistance and special material
designed for students. If you are
interested in Israel, Israel is
interested in you.

sequently, Kellman believes,
"with essentially all LSA mem-
bers, MSA would be more
grossly malapportioned than
now."
The seven month grace per-
iod grantd MSA by CSJ will
allow the Assembly "adequate
time to re-work the constitution
before it is presented to stu-
dents in the Fall election," ac-
cording to MSA member Chris
Bachelder.
Presiding* CSJ justice Bob
Morton said the court granted
the reprieve because "if we in-
voked immediate implementa-
tion of the remedy, we would
destroybMSA by fractionalizing
it and by undermining its cred-
ibility with therAdministration."
HOWEVER Bachelder feels
that although the terms of the
Judiciary's decision were leg-
ally justified, no decision was
really necessary. "When and if
MSA is required to draw up a
new plan, Bachelder says, "it
won't inherently be any better
than the one w have now."
Although many might peg,
ceive the MSA situation as an
either /or dilemma, that is,
dropping the "equal weight"
clause or changing school and
college rpresentation, CSJ jus-
tice Tyrone Tartt has offered
a third choice.
Tartt said his proposal "would
not differ substantially from
the present MSA plan at all."
Through technical legal chan-
ges, Tartt's recommendation
would allow MSA to retain
school and college representa-
tion, while keeping the "equal
weight" clause in the constitu-
tion._
Join The Daily
Arts Department!

. 41 . down

2

I

I

213 S. MAIN STREET

Israel Aliyah Center
25900 Greenfield Road
Suite 352
Oak Park, Michigan 48237
(313) 968-1044

NOTICE
Non-Native Speakers of English
All speakers of English asia second language'
are invited to take part in an experimental test

'E

I

I

ET INVOLVED
POWERFUL PEOPLE NEEDED
* Do you have personality and organizational skills?
" Would you like to get involved in the decision-making process
at U of M?
Because of graduation and term expiration the Student Government
has student openings on the following committees:
UNIVERSITY COMMITTEES:
Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics
Program Evaluation
Budget Priorities
Residency Appeal Review Committee
University Steering Committee
Office of Student Services Policy Board
ACRICS (2 veor position)
Energy Conservation Task Force
University Cellar Board of Directors (2 year position)
University Council
Union Board of Directors
Academic Planning Analysis Committee
SACUA COMMITTEES:
Civil Liberties Board
Student Relations Committee
University Relations
Classified Research
MSA Committees
Personal Interviewing Committee
Insurance Committee
Budget Priorities
Program Committee
Student Organizations Board
Previous committee experience is not reguire.d. All that is necessa-y is the willingness
to devote a small ariount of time to the/committee work.

of English language proficiency to be given
ROOM 1025 ANGELL HALL at 7:00 P.M.
the 31st of MARCH. You will receive $5.00f
approximately 1 1/2 hours of your time. If"
terested you, must call and register at the f
lowing number: 764-2413 or 764-2416.

in
on
for
in-
ol-

*No ELI students currently enrolled in the intensive English
courses ore eligible for the test at this time.

APRIL GRADS
to attend commencement
you must order a
cap and gown by
MARCH 30, 1977
From the U. CELLAR
769-7940

1

I

Ill_

I

CLASSES
GETTING
YOU
DOWNto

6

U-1

it

II

I 112;11igI .

* II

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