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March 25, 1977 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-25

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Page Ten'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, March 25, 1977

Paae Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY

a lovin'
glassfulI

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ADVERTISING
IN THE
MICHIGAN
DAILY
DOESN'T

CARTER SPEAKS TO PRESS
U.S. seeks arms reductions

COST .
IT

WASHINGTON (AP) - Presi-I
dent Carter said yesterday that'
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance'
will go to Moscow this week to
seek actual arms reductions+
rather than a ceiling on future
arms growth.
Carter said his administra-
tion's- goal is a cutback in ex-
isting weapons, "for a change."1
THE PRESIDENT outlined at
a broadcast news conference an
ambitious agenda for American-
Soviet talks ranging from a ban
on nuclear testing to demilitar-
izing the 'Indian Ocean.
Carter said Vance and other
U.S. negotiators will have as
their "fall back position" the re-1

negotiation of the less ambitious1
1974 Vladivostok accord arrang-
ed by Ford and Soviet Leader
Leonid Brezhnev that expires in
October.
While strategic arms based on
the Vladivostok formula would
place a ceiling on the nuclear
weapons delivery systems of
both countries, Carter empha-
sized his real goal is actual
arms cutbacks.
Other highlights of the Presi-
dent's meeting with reporters
included Carter's statements
that:
* Inflation this year is likely
to hit six per cent "or a little
better" and the administration

within two weeks will present crossed the border into Zaire."
to Congress a very strong "an- Carter emphasized that "we
ti-inflation package." !have no obligations as far as
" If Vietnam acts in good military aid goes" in the case
faith to account for American of -Zaire.
servicemen missing in Indochi- The President opened the con-
na, "I would aggressively move ference with a brief speech in
to admit Vietnam to the United which he noted "there have
Nations and normalize rela- been some expressions of con-
tions" between Hanoi and Wash- cern" about his extensive dis-

. "

PAYS
I
YOU'RE
READING
THIS,
AREN'T
YOU
164-0554

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NOTICE
Non-Native Speakers of English
All speakers of English as a second language*
are invited to take part in an experimental test
of English language proficiency to be given in
ROOM 1025 ANGELL HALL at 7:00 P.M. on
the 31st of MARCH. You will receive $5.00 for
approximately 1 1/2 hours of your time. If in-
terested you must call and register at the fol-
lowing number: 764-2413 or 764-2416.
*No ELI students currently enrolled in the intensive English
courses are eligible for the test at this time.

ington.
At the same time, "I don't
feel we ought to apologize or
castigate outselves" for the Am-
erican role in the Vietnam war,
indicating he feels no moral ob-
ligation to help rebuild that
country through economic aid.
However, Carter said he would
"respond well" to a request for
American economic assistance
if relations are established.
Brezhnev and his 'Soviet
colleagues "have been very
cooperative up to this point"
in preparing for forthcoming
negotiations, not withstanding
disagreements over human
rights statements by Carter and
others.
The President said Brezhnev
has been working on the agen-
da for the Vance visit and gives
every sign "that he hopes that
the talks will be productive."'
* The United States has "no
outstanding commitments in
Zaire," although there are sub-
stantial U.S. commercial invest-
ments there, and "we have no
hard evidence or any evidence
that Angolans or Cubans have,

cussions of foreign policy issues
at news conferences and in oth-
er forums.
DEFENDING his practices,
Carter said:
"I think it is very important
that the strength of the presi-
dency itself be recognized as
deriving from the people of this
nation, and I think it is good
for us even in very complex
matters, when the outcome of
negotiations might still be in
doubt to let the members of
Congress and the people of this
country know what is going on,
and some of the options to be
pursued ..."
In discussing Vance's Moscow
mission, Carter said the secre-
tary of state will be discussing
restrictions on arms sales as
well as on the arsenals of the
two superpowers.
"We are now the No. 1 ex-
porter or salesman of arms of
all kinds," Carter said. "We
have been-working with our own
allies to cut down this traffic,
and we hope to get the Soviet
Union to agree with us on con-
straint."

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cholarships

SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS-

A career in law-
without law choola
Whft can you do with only a bachelor's degree?
Now there is a way to bridge the gap between an
undergraduate education and a challenging, respon-
sible career. The Lawyer's Assistant is able to do
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choose one of the seven courses offered-choose
the city in which you want to work.
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has placed more than 1600 graduates 'in -law firms.
banks, and corporations in over 75 cities.
If you are a senior of high academic standing and
are interested in a career as a Lawyer's Assistant,
we'd like to meet you.
Contact your placement office for an interview with
our representative.
We will visit your campus on
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30
THURSDAY, MARCH 31
The Institute for
Paralegal Training
235 South 17th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania '9103
(215) 732-6600
Operated by Para-legal, Inc.

Parents cautious in
tense Bir/ingham
(Continued from Page 1) "MAYBE IT'S a false as-
"IT'S A BAD situation," she sumption," he suggested.
said. "We don't want it to hap- In front of the green-gray
pen again." building, a Michigan State
But not all parents were as University student was among
nervous. the people waiting for children
"I don't mind my son walking or siblings to emerge.

home," one mother said: "I'm
afraid this is turning into a cir-
cus. The kids don't need this."

"She used to walk home,
Claudia Kidd said of her 13-
year-old sister, abutn right now
she's pretty upset. Last nght

4

Fall Winter 1976-77

Each year at this time the LSA Scholarship Committee extends congratula-
tions to those students who were awarded scholarships throughout the current
year. Names and scholarships awarded last year are as follows:

AT NEARBY Derby Junior she was really emotional.
High School, which Tim's broth- The King murder as well as
er Mark attends, one adminis- the six other' Oakland County
trator reported that more par- slayings, she said, has "left a
ents than usual were driving big impact on Birmingham."
their children home from
school. AT A PRESS conference yes-
Though it appeared to be terday afternoon, State Police
business as usual inside the Sgt. Joe Kriese, a member of
school, the administrator con- a special investigative task
ceded that the murder had left force formed as a result of the
an impact on the student body: murders, said plce have re-
"They're concerned. They talk ceived "well in excess of 3000"
about it. Most of the kids are tips since the series of slaying
interested in getting home in a began in January, 1976. Police
heck of a hurry." are acting on the assumption
fie said the school had issued r that only four of thetmurders
a few announcements over the were committed by thesame
public address system which person.
warned students to be careful, Investigators theorize that the
but he added that staff mem- killer is a well-educated white
bers "assume these kids know male with a white collar or
what's going on and can take professional career. They be-

GENERAL UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS

Daniel Kaplan
Buff Kavelman
Stuart Kieran
Chung Kim
Leonora Knoblock
Nancy Koptur
David Koss
Pansy Ku
Connie LaClair
Linda Lamping
Sandra Levine
Ruth Lewis
-Elaire Lopez
Eliana Loveluck
Mark Lowenthal
Kristi Lubeck
Edwin Madai
Walter Mahoney
Richard Malaby
Gertrud Maurer
Sandra McAlpine
Kevin McBride
Joyce Mechling
Todd Mennenberg
Clifford Merlo
Beverley Meyers
Judith Miller

Stephen Moser
Jean Nahan
Ruth Naiditch
Frederick Neumann
James Nichols
Timothy O'Connor
Candace Oyler
Terri Palma
Patricia Pancioli
Andrea Parmelee
Christine Pendzich
James Piasecki
John Poceta
Judith Polakowski
Michael Porte
Donald Pritchard
John Purnell
Lea Reinharz
Ann Renauer
Anita Riddle
Dennis Ritter
Carolyn Rosenberg
Mark Rubens
Ronnie Ruff
Caroline Rushford
Lynda Schuster
Christine Sedmak

Liana Sher
Peter Shinevar
Cynthia Shulak
Susan Silagi
Howard Snyder
Marcia Solomon
Steven Soper
Nancy Spangler
Susan Stevens
Roberta Stewart
Ian Stockdale
Doreen Sukenic
Harvey Sukenic
Patricia Sweeney
Wayne Tsang
Mark Torf
Latricia Turner
Helen Uete
Jacqueline Urla
Ronald VanderLoan
Darlene Vorachek
Elaine Warren
David Webb
Shari Wolinsky
Eitan Yanich
Linda Zeff
Gregory Zott

'care of themselves.
- - -- - --- " - I

HOUSING DIVISION

MARKLEY HALL

RESIDENT STAFF APPLICATIONS
FOR SPRING/SUMMER 1977
Available Starting March 28, 1977 in

Ms. Charlene Coady's Office,

1500 S.A.B.

ALDRICH SCHOLARSHIPS PHEBE HOWELL SIMON MANDELBAUM
Richard Capriccioso SCHOLARSHIPS SCHOLARSHIPS
Roberta Kasman Kathleen Foster David Calzone
f ~Kerrin Hoban t
Dennis Peck Cynthia Rowry Gary Cohen
HARRY HELFMA N SCHOLARSHIPS
Sharolyn Max Bidle Helen Giessler Denise Meininger Kevin Roth
Aschenbrenner Lynn Brenman Jodie Kangas Joan Moses Karla Ussery
Catherine Beaumont June Entus John Les Barbara Moultrup John VanHulle
Laurie Berman Shelly Gilbert WilliamMalone Gregory Rose Robert Weintraub
RUTH ABBOTT JONES SCHOLARSHIPS RONALD BUCK MEDICAL
Joan Binder Carol Harding William Sanders MARTINEZ TECHNOLOGY
Thomas Bryan Lisa Lipcaman Michael Snyder SCHOLARSHIP SCHOLARSHIPS
Penny Comm Robert Morton James Spurr Mary Jo Burpee
Thomas Rooke Cynthia Chang
Darnl Eekie Kenet Ric Bran TnenaumMarianne O'Connor

POSITIONS INCLUDE: Resident Director and Resident Advisor.
Advisory positions require Junior status or above for the Resident Ad-
visors positions. Graduate status preferred for the Resident Directors
positions. However, qualified applicants who have Junior status' or
above during the period of employment may be considered for the
Resident Director positions.
QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Must be a registered U. of M. student on the
Ann Arbor Campus in good academic standing during the period of
employment. (2) Must be Junior status or above during the period of
employment. (3) Must have lived in residence halls at University level
for at least one year. (4) Must have a 2.5 grade point average at time
of application. (5) Preference is given to applicants who do not intend
to carry heavy academic schedules and who do not have rigorous
outside commitments. (6) Applicants with children will not be consider-
ed. (7) Proof of these qualifications may be required.

lieve the man has a fetish for
cleanliness,, abnormal sexual
preferences, and lives or works
in Oakland County.
But Kriese, added, "There is
a, strong possibility of two
males involved. We don't want
to discount that."
AN AUTOPSY performed on
the King boy's body revealed
that he died of suffocation and
had been sexually molested.
'Since the body was found in
Livonia, Wayne County authori-
ties have now entered the case.
"Perhaps (the killer) thought
he outwitted us by dropping the
body there." Kriese said, "but
he did cross the county line."
A WITNESS believed to be
the last person to see Tim be-
fore his disappearance said the
boy was talking to a man in
a parking lot behind the Hunt-
er - Maple Pharmacy in Birm-
ingham. The pair were report-
ed to be standing beside, a late
model blue Gremlin. Police
said that man is being sought
as a witness in the case, not
necessary as a suspect.
Kriese said he believes there
is "someone out there who has
knowledge (of the killer) that
could tell us. I dont know why
they're holding out."
Horseback Riding
(NO GUIDES)
Hayrides-
Rec. Hall for rent
.Y2 hr. South on RT 23
To Sameria
Exit on M 151-East 5 min.
DOUGLAS MEADOWS
RANCHI
2755 M 151
Temperance, MI 48182
Ph. 313-856-$973
ORIENTAL RUGS
, AT a..

I

Current staff and other applicants who have an application
on file must come to this office to update their application
form. Staff selection and placement shall be determined in
the following order:
1. Current staff in Markley Hall.
2. Current staff throughout the Residence Hall system.

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