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March 25, 1977 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-25

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'Friday, March 25 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rage Three

Friday, March 25, 1977 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

DAILY DIGEST MARCH 25, 1977

International

I'ndia changes
Russia policy
NEW DELHI, India - India's
new prime minister, 81-year-old
Morarji Desai, took office yes-
terday and promptly announced
a major policy shift away from
the country's traditional special
relations with the Soviet Union.
"We won't have any special
relations with any country,"
Desai said in a press confer-
ence minutes after he was
sworn in as India's fourth prime
minister since independence.
DESAI, long considered pro-
Western, said India would adopt
a foreign policy of "proper non-
alignment" and would seek
changesin the 1971 Indo-Soviet
friendship treaty if necessary.
"If the Indo-Soviet friendship
treaty involves any want of
friendship with others, then it
will have to change," Desai
said.
American officials in Washing-
tion of Desai. Despite his com-
mitment to India's traditional
nonalignment they expected him
to seek better relations with
the United States.
U.S., Cuba
negotiate
HAVANA - Informed suc
es said yesterday the United
States and Cuba have begun
talks on their overlapping fish-
ing limits, believed to be the
first direct negotiations since
the two countries broke rela-
tions 16 years ago.
Both Cuba and the United
States extended their fishing
limits to 200 nautical miles ear-
lier this month. Large areas of
the fishing zones are overlap-
ping as Cuba lies only 90 miles
south of Florida.
TALKS FOR the 1973 bilater-
al anti - hijacking agreement
were carried out through the
Swiss Embassy, which handles
American interests here.
President Carter has served
notice, however, that a resump-
tion of ties depends on Cuba's
removal of troops from Angola
and an end to "their aggravat-
ing influence" in this hemi-
sphere.
The American negotiating
team was headed by Terence
Todman, the assistant secre-
tary of state for inter-Ameri-
can affairs, and the Cuban
group by vice foreign minister
Pelegrin Torres. Each coun-
try had eight ' man teams at
the table.
EARLIER in the day, at 'a,
news conference, Carter said
he would like to see relations
established with all 14 coun-
tries with whom the United
States currently has no diploma-
tic ties. Carter's remarks were
addressed particularly to Viet-
nam where the administration
is also taking steps toward es-
tablishing relations.
Cuba, for most Americans,
is in a special category. Only
90 miles from Florida it at-
tracted American tourists, pro-
vided sugar for American tables
and a solid succession of Amer-
ican baseball stars.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 138
Friday, March 25, 1977
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan.News
phone 764-0562. second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a i l y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 42 Maynard Street. Ann
Arbor, Michigan 4109. Subscription

rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor;- $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

National
Ford's return
visit to D.C.

WASHINGTON - It was justI
like the old days yesterday forl
Gerald Ford. Police escort.
Secret Service cars in front 1
and back of his limousine. Sit-
ting in front of a fire in the
Oval Office.
Only this time it was Jim-
my Carter,'s Oval Office and
Ford was a guest.j
"YOU GOT me off to a good,
start," said 'Carter as he greet-
ed his predecessor in the White
House driveway. "You look so
healthy and tanned, I'm en-
vious."
Ford replied, "You're looking'
good yourself."
It was Ford's first visit to
the capital and the White House
since he left office two months
and four days ago. He was in
Washington to see his new of-'
fice at the American Enter-
prise Institutefor Public Poli-
cy, a conservative think tank
that has named him a Distin-
guished Fellow.
THE VISIT with Carter was
cordial but Ford was so solemn
that he almost looked grim.
In the presence of photog-
raphers and reporters the two
men chatted about foreign af-
fairs, the President commenting
that British Prime Minister
James Callaghan had "appar-
ently a tight squeeze" in win-
ning a vote of confidence in par-
liament.
Carter started to tell Ford
that the United States was
working on international air-
line negotiations with the Bri-
tish but Ford, an old hand at
that kind of thing, interjected,
"I'm familiar with it."
Carter told his predecessor
that he had had' "good visits"
with Callaghan, Japan's Prime
Minister Takeo Fukuda and
Canada's Pierre Trudeau.
Minimum wage
WASHINGTON - Organized
labor, outmaneuvered in its
first congressional test this
year, faces even more difficul-
ty with other legislative goals
such as repeal of state right-to-
work laws, Democratic congres-
sional leaders said yesterday.
"Labor is going to have to
make an awfully convincing
case to get anything else
through, both with Congress
and the public," said House
Majority Leader James Wright.
THE SURPRISING defeat in
the House on Wednesday night
of a bill authorizing unrestrict-
ed picketing at construction
sites dimmed chances for most
major labor legislation in this

session - and no one knew it
better than labor's own lobby-
ists.
"We got caught with our
pants down," said Victor Kam-
ber, top lobbyist for the AFL-
CIO Building and Construction
Trades Department.
But, by the same token, Kam-
ber and his fellow lobbyists
predicted the sting of defeat
would also work to stiffen la-
bor's resolve.1
"WE MAY suffer for it initi-
ally, but we're not dead," het
said.
"Sure we're going to have to
fight, and 14B repeal is going
to be more difficult, but it al-
ways has."
Fourteen-B, the section in the
Taft-Hartley Act authorizing
states to ban union shop agree-
ments, is part of a broad leg-
islative package being pushed
by the AFL-CIO, along with the
common situs picketing bill, an
increase in the minimum wage
and sweeping changes in fed-
eral law to make it easier for
unions to organize and negotiate
contracts.
Labor losses

posed that beginning in July
1978 and in future years, the
minimum wage be set at 50 per
cent of the average straight-
time, hourly wage of manufac-
turing workers.
The proposed 20-cent hike
was a disappointment to organ-
ized labor and many congres-
sional Democrats who want an
immediate 70-cent increase,
with future increases pegged at
60 per cent of average hourly
manufacturing wages.
State

Another

boy
_ _.-

reported lost
HOLLY - Authorities in this
northern Oakland County com-
munity were searching today
for a boy reported missing ear-
ly in the day.
Police refused to identify the
boy or disclose further details
of the case or the search, con-
firming only that a youngster
had been reported missing and
the case was under investiga-
tion.

WASHINGTON - The Carter "HE'S NOT where he's sup-
administration proposed on posed to me," a police spokes-
Thursday that the minimum man said. "But I can't give out
wage be increased from $2.30 to any information."
$2.50 starting in July, compared Police refused to speculate on
to a $3 minimum sought by' or- whether the youngster's disap-
ganized labor. pearance could be related to a
The administration also pro -series of child kidnap-killings in
I THE 13th CENTURY SERIES I

Detroit's northern suburbs over
the last 14 months.
All seven previous child dis-
appearances and slayings took
place in the southern part of
the county.
House puts off
Seafarer vote
LANSING - Members of the
House Policy Committee have
put off taking a stand on Pro-
ject Seafarer until next Thurs-
day - by which time Congress
may have taken them off the
hook.
Rep. John Maynard, a Sea-
farer supporter, asked the com-
mittee yesterday to support a
resolution setting up a legisla-
Have a flair for
artisticari ting?
ed in reviewu e
or writing feature
stories about the
drama, dance, film
arts: Contact Arts
Editor,'c/o The
Mihgan aily
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tive study of the project - a
study he believes would prove
Seafarer is medically and en-
vironmentally safe and neces-
sary for the national defense.
COMMOTTEE mem-
bers were told, however, that
a Congressional panel is sched-
uled to vote on Seafarer next
week and may well kill the pro-
ject.
Saying they needed more
time to study the matter, the
committee voted 7-2 to delay
action on Maynard's resolution
and one offered by Rep. John
Hertel (D-Detroit) which would
reaffirm the legislature's oppo-
sition to Seafarer.
SCIENCE FICTION-
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ALL YOU NEED
odIS LOVE .. .
.. of kids, the outdoors, lotsa energy and patience. If
you have these qualities, we'd like you to share the
summer with us at Camp Tamarack, a summer camp
operated by the Jewish Fresh Air Society.
We have openings for counselors, supervisors, social
workers. counselor specialists, and drivers. Our recruit-
ers will be interviewing for these jobs on Wednesday,
March 30 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Register in person for
:. an appointment at 3200 SAB, or send for an applica-
tion in care of the
FRESH AIR SOCIETY
6600 W. Maple, W. Bloomfield, MI 48033
6-y --ytOC' - !(O<--.' --y -- t<:-:C<--' -:Y'JC
POWERFUL PEOPLE NEEDED
Because of graduation and term expiration,
Student Government has student openings on
all of the:
UNIVERSITY COMMITTEES
S.A.C.U.A. COMMITTEES
M.S.A. COMMITTEES
POWERFUL PEOPLE are needed to fill
these vacancies and deal with the ad-
ministration and faculty members.
If you feel that you can handle the challenge
and the responsibility, apply now at the M.S.A.
Offices, 3rd floor, Michigan Union.
DEADLINE MARCH 30

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