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March 23, 1977 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-23

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, March 23 1977

Page EIght TH~ MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, March 23~ 1977

Council delays plans CONTROL OF CITY AT STAKE:
ouncildelaymelan

OURS

Tw
a
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WED., MAR. 23-4:30-6:30
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By LANI 'JORDAN
Although funding plans have
been in the works since late last
summer the $1.7 million repair
project on Ann Arbor's parking
structures and lots now faces
further delay. .
Monday night City Council
tabled three resolutions, in-
cluding a special assessment on
property surrounding the park-
ing areas, which would have set
the repair project in motion.
Council also defeated 6-5 a
fourth resolution which would
have increased parking rates in
the city's lots and structures to
fund a portion of the repair
costs.
COUNCIL MEMBER Louis
Belcher (R-Fifth Ward), who
initiated the motions to table
the first three of the four-reso-
lution package, said, "All we're
doing now is applying a band-
aid with this one time only re-
pair."
The original parking plan,
submitted last summer called
for repairs of city parking
structures, construction of two
Six
WAY S
GET A
FASTER
REFU fN D
ONE
Check
your math.
Use the right
schedule
or tax tabie.
THRE-E t
Use the peel-oft
label and

Ward 4 seat

new structures and the pur-
chase of the Forest St. parking
facility, currently leased from
a private owner.
The plan also included a
"sinking fund" - money set
aside to finance future parking
repairs.
A special assessment was or-'
iginally proposed to fund the
parking repairs. In the ensu-
ing months, however, purchase
of the parking structure and
creation of the sinking fund
were deleted from the proposal.
City statute prohibits the use ofI
a special assessment for suchj
uses.
C O N S T R U C T I O N
plans for any new parking
structures were also struck
from that proposal.
Under that proposal, 60 per
cent, or $1,073,040, of thefund-
ing for the repairs would come
from special assessment on sur-
rounding property with the re-;
maining 40 per cent,,or $715,360
from increases in current park-
ing rates.
Belcher said he opposed the
plan because "the entire thing
is chopped up now. There are
no plans for new structures,
nothing for a sinking fund."
HE ADDED that downtown
area businesses had only
agreed to the special assess-
ment earlier because new park-
ing facilities had been included
in the proposal.
Council member Carol Jones
Dwyer (D-Second Ward) told
Belcher he was "welcome to
write up the resolution and get
it on the road."
Most council Democrats have
long opposed construction of'
new parking facilities as well
as the special assessment to
fund repairs.
Democratic Mayor AlbertI
Wheeler proposed that Council
pass the resolutions to fundj
necessary repairs and "look at
the whole parking picture again
in a few months."

(continued from Page 1) emphasizing the city's improved'
THE LEFT-WING Human finarncial status, deg.lines in the
Rights Party, (HRP), which reported crime rate and what heE
kept any party from getting a terms improved government ef-'I
majority in the 1973 and 1975 ficiency which have occurred
elections, has no candidate this during his two years on the
year. If that voting block goes Council. His leaflets and ads4
to Hemervck instead, T r o w- stress promises he made in his
bridge could be in real trouble. 1975 campaign which he says
Because of the critical nature have been fulfilled during hisI
of the race and its far from cer- term, emphasizing his pledge
tain outcome, both candidates to block further expansion of the
are conducting vigorous canvas- Ann Arbor Airport.
sing efforts. "The candidate who Srveral observers have con-
campaigns door-to-door the most flicting assessments of the race
will win the election," according and its likely outcome.
to former Fourth Ward Republi- "The incumbent usually has
can Councilman Bill Colburn. an advantage, but Trowbridge
Colburn is presently managing has done little. He's had zero
Trowbridge's campaign. visibility," commented Ethel
Hemeryck focuses his attack Lewis, an active member of the
on what he calls Trowbridge's Democratic party and a former
"unresponsiveness to commun- City Council candidate in the
ity needs and concerns." He ward.
criticizes his opponent's 1976 run
for the Republican congressional KENWORTHY added, "I don't
nomination for taking too much think he's been south of 1-94
time from his City Council du- since he's been elected." Ken-
ties. And he charges that the worthy said Trowbridge has no
City Hall bureaucracy has too important committee assign-
much power and elected offi- ments, that he voted to pit a
cials too little role in running repeal of the $5 marijuana law
the city. on the 1975 ballot, that he
TROWBRIDGE'S campaign is blocked federal housing money:

as well as the creation of a I-
man Services department, and'
that he voted for ordinances'
that would hamper day care
centers in residential areas.
"Trpwbridge is popular with
students. He relates well with
students," Colburn observed.
But he called the ward's stu-'
dent vote unpredictable, noting
that there are no "hot issues"
like housing or marijuana to
draw students to the polls.
Kenworthy pointed to Hem-
eryck's work in housing as an
attraction for student votes. He
said Hemeryck helpad persuade
the Department of Housing and
Urban Development to sell!
abandoned houses and also'
backed tenants against land-
lords whose buildings violated'!
city housing codes.

SOME PARTY members crit-
icized the move, becauses so
much money was spent so early
in the campaign, but Colburn
thinks it was worth it.
Money and lack thereof con-
cerned members from both oar-
ties. Colbur.n cited the fall elec-
tions and Trowbridge's 1976 try
for the U.S. House of Represen-
tatives as drains on needed
cash.
"People aren't giving money
in the same amounts," he- ex-
plained. Kenworthy expects
Hemeryck to be "outspent two
or three dollars to one."
The outcome of the race will
also be affected by the mayoral
race. "A lot depends on how
Wheeler does," said Kenworthy.
"If he gets clobbered, there's no
way Hemeryck can win."
Likewise, the mayoral race
may be affected by the door-to-
door work and publicity efforts
of Trowbridge and Hemeryck.
If one of them does particularly
well, he will bring some votes to
the mayoral candidate of his
party. In this way, the Fourth
Ward council race takes on an
even greater importance for the
political future of this city.

I

An endorsement ad for Trow-
bridge which ran a week ago
Sunday pleased Colburn. It car-
ried 400 names and Colburn said
it was the first endorsement ad
he's seen run so far in advance
of an election.
"I was pleased to see that we
could do it. It was a gamble. It
was a good thing to do."

I
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3

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Surprise!

Keep students on
boards, MSA asks

Houingiu's

bad

Department of Nea
Is Sponsoring
D R. ARNOL
(Professor of Con
and Llteratu
ENTITLED:
S"VISIONS OF J
RECENT ISRAEL
THURSDAY, March
Lecture Rr
Pa P :a) Ad

--%_-x01P-f----By LINDA BRENNERS
Reacting to the Regents' interpretation of the Michigan Open
(continued from Page 1) roam, compared with 10 per cent Meetings, Act redefining the status of decision-making bodies, the
While crowding of tenants outside the "central eight" Michigan Student Assembly (MSA) last night urged that students
withn unts ws nt asseriu,3tracts.
iAnn Arbor asnt asherein TWENTY-ONE per cent of all be guaranteed membership on all University committees now
tin nitsAwason aswsereiun Th eets uig elrd htth or isl s o h
the county, the report saidcen- respondents said their heat was termed "advisory boards."
tral city residents were more "not very good" or "not good The Regents' ruling declared that the Board itself is now the
likely to find themselves with- at all" and over half indicated only decision-making body on campus, thus the only group sub-
out an "extra" room. they had to do something to ject to the act.
compensate for lack of heat. MSA MEMBERS expressed concern that the change in status
a oting a umb ntalu Other frequent tenant com- of many University groups from decision-making to advisory
Stiel roos o a entl unit paints included thin walls (52.9 bodies might lead University administrators to overlook the rights
position-two rooms and abath- per cent considered it a prob- of student representation on these committees.
roo fb asinleperon forn) ,insects (25 per cent) and
room fbr a sigle person, for broken plaster or peeling paint In the past, students have been allowed representation on
example - the study found that (20 per cent). Only one-fifth of University advisory boards.
40 per cent of all central city the units reported none of the MSA member Wendy Goodman said that her proposal for
residents lack at least one bed- city housing code violations they student membership on all University advisory committees
> were quizzed on. ' is consistent with the Regents' own beliefs.
The committee made several "Following on the advisement of the Commission to Study
ar Eastern Studies recommendations to the Mayor, Student Government report," she said, "the Regents supported
including: student representation on advisory committees."
a Lecture by j the University should ac- Though MSA is not subject to the Open Meetings Act, all
cept more responsibility for members voted to comply with the provisions of tlye law.
s .YA0housing oete buidincodesmust MSA members also overwhelmingly voted to condemn the
rparative Hebrew be reformed to permit build- administration fAr the firing of student cafeteria workers ab-
are, UCLA) ers to take advantage of new sent during the recent campus AFSCME strike.
technology. The housing code, Member Mike Taylor said that students were "fired for their
however, should not be weak- convictions."
E R U SA L E M IN v? ened and a provision requiring-- -- -- --
" security from break-ins should
LI LITERATURE" be added;
*Oall city inspections should
h 24th-4:00 P.M. be done with the permission of
n. , MLB the tenant; (Continued from Page 1) in mass transit."
Sa "Repair and Deduct" trolley car restoration, is ex- Mayoral candidate Louis Bel-
act, permitting tenants to make pected to donate his services to cher (R-Fifth Ward) said he is
minor repairs and subtract the restore the trolley. in favor of a downtown trolley
:C~t rr,+ repair costs from their rent But although the car itself line.
should be passed. Such repairs will soon be ready for use, there "It is a natural contingency
would take place only if the de- may be no tracks for it to run in connecting State St. and
71fect is a code violation and the on. Main St.," Belcher said.
landlord has been notified of it; Private support for the trolley The city of Detroit has a trol-
* a lease clause ordinance system has widened, but the ley system which began opera-
should be enacted requiring all Ann Arbor City Council is still tions last year.
leases to carry warnings, that split on the idea of a trolley line. DETROIT TRANSIT Depa
some lease clauses may be ille- Last year, -Council turned down meat Planner Alex Pollock, the
/ gal and to list telephone num- a request for money to study trolley's principle designer, said
bers of possible tenant help or- the trolley's feasibility, the Washington Blvd.- six-block
ganizations; trolley line cost $3/4-million to
0 the city and University "I WAS apposed to even install. He said most of this fig-
should insure mortgages for spending the money for the ure was for one-time costs, such
limited income and. non-profit study," Democrat Mayor Albert as the $600.000 for laying the
sponsored building programs in Wheeler said. "Even though street tracks
the central city. they (city officials) consider it "It's good for the city," Pol-
The survey expands upon more free money from the state, I lock said. "It is more reliable
limited work done by an earlier see too manq other priorities to than the mini-bus and it has
mayoral committee in 1975. spend money on improvements been very successful."
ten be responsive and act Pollock estimated that about
1 ,AA pronAia emrie

preaddressed
envelope.
FOUR
Include
all W-2 forms.
FIVE
Attach all
supporting
schedules.
Sign your return.
On a joint return
both should sign.
Internal Revenue Service

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University Housing
Council
WINTER ELECTIONS
Apil4, 5, 6
'e Filing Open Until Friday, March 25
0 F pti trntin n nrmq Avn i inhle t

1,000 persons ride the trolley
each day and it brings many
surburbians to the city.
"It's an attraction for per-
sons whol have never seen or
ridden one," said Harold Rose,
Superintendent of Detroit Trans-
it Maintenance. He said the
costs to operate the line are
slight compared to those of die-
sel buses.
"We don't expect the trolley
to pay for itself," Rose admit-
ted. "It never will. Show me
any transit system that does."
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