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March 22, 1977 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-22

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Page Two

Tuesday, March 22, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC
- and THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION present
Tuesday, March 22 8 p.m. Power Center
$3.00 AND $2.50 (STUDENTS)
Tickets are available at the Alumni Association Office in
the Michiqlan Union, at the Information Office of the
School of Music and at the door.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL (313) 764-0384

Strikers back on
job; some fired

Guidelines OK'd
for program cuts
(Continued from Page 1) He claimed the proposal fails
tary public flurry in deciding to to separate the issue of program
institute a new program or de- liquidation from the issue of fir-
partment," he cautioned. ing tenured staff.

Check your roots,
author Haley says

-AUDITIONS-
MARCH 26-1:00 P.M.-APRIL 2
ROOM 2058 SCHOOL OF MUSIC

(Continued from Page 1)
"Disciplinary action"' can in-
clude anything from a warning
to a complete discharge.
Chief University Negotiator
William Neff agreed with Ander-
son that 28 suspensions seemed
an unusually high figure, but
added that the final "true"
number would be much great-
er than twelve.
"TWENTY-EIGHT people is a
lot off the mark," Neff said. "I
was informed that we had only
suspended 18 so far."
He said that the University
contemplated a grand total of
about 20 suspensions for strike-
related activities.

T
r
t
T

When told of AFSCME claims
that supervisors were "jumping
the gun," Neff replied, "If that
is the case we will try to correct
it."
ACCORDING to Neff, workers
are being suspended only if
there is evidence they were in-
volved in assaults, disturbances,
or vandalism of University prop-
erty.

_
I

IN ATTEMPTING to meet the
overwhelming social needs of
the time, Elving said the Uni-
versity must consider the fu-
ture costs and viability of new
programs.

Tonight in Auditorium A, Angell Hall
Tuesday, March 22
OPHULS NIGHT
THE EARRINGS OF MADAME DE --
(Max Ophuls, 1953) 7:00 ONLY--AUD. A
Director Ophuls' famous tracking shots would follow the characters
into rooms, out of rooms, and through the walls of rooms as if the
cameraman had the mobility of a ghost. "This tragedy of love,
which begins in narcissistic flirtation and passes from romance
to passion to desperation is, ironically, set in aristocratic\ circles
that seem too superficial to take love tragically. Perfection."-
Pauline Kael, The New Yorker. Danielle Darrieux, Charles Boyer,
Vittorio de Sica. French with subtitles.
LOLA MONTES
(Max Ophuls, 1955) 9:15 ONLY-AUD. A
Ophuls' final and finest film depicts, through flashbacks, the life
of a famous courtesan, recounted as part of the lavish circus act.
Lola recalls her romances with Franz Liszt, a student and a king
before she was reduced to the humiliation of her present life-a
paid spectacle or the masses, a bravura masterpiece." . . . Andrew
Sarris. Martine Carol, Peter Ustinov, Oskar Werner, French with
subtitles.
ADMISSION: $1.25 single feature, $2.00 double feature
0
Wednesday, March 23 in Aud. A.
"EVERY MAN FOR HIMSELF
AND GOD AGAINST ALL"
Thursday, March 24 in Aud. A
POLANSKI NIGHT
"CUL-DE-SAC" and
"THE FEARLESS VAMPIRE KILLERS"

VISTA & PEACE CORPS
NEED YOUR SKILL!"?
REPRESENTATIVES
WILL BE ON CAMPUS ..
MARCH 22-24 IN THE
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
BUILDING
CAREER PLANNING AND
PLACEMENT
RM 3200

"None of the suspensions are English Prof. Eric Rabkin,
based upon one's status in the one of five faculty members op-
strike, they are all based on nosing passage of the draft, said
specific actions," he said. it lends itself "to a Machiavel-
I In other words, "no one is be- lian scenario. This document
fing suspended simply because may be a document for firing
they are a picket captain," Neff people a
said.
MANY OF the employes who: ATLANTA (UPI) - E v e r y
were suspended yesterday were year, an estimated 30,000 Amer-
taken totally by surprise, An- icans must undergo extensive
derson said. They are suspended and painful treatment after be-
rending an individual hearing ing bitten or scratched by ani-
later this week between the Uni- mals suspected of being rabid.
versity and Anderson. The treatments included one
Meanwhile, student workers shot of a quick-acting serum
are also feeling the conse- made from the blood of horses
quences of "striking." which produced reactions some-
Many student employes who times so severe as to require
refused to perform their jobs hospitalization for up to two
over the past weeks in support weeks. That shot was followed
of AFSCME have been told they by 23 vaccinations of a killed
have since been replaced. virus prepared from duck eggs
ACCORDING to University and spaced about a week apart.
Housing Director John Feld- The, 23 vaccinations, which
kamp, students "are not being usualiy produce no reactions or
disciplined for their sympathy mild ones, are still necessary
with the strike, they're being but physicians now have a new
disciplined for their failure to: serum made from human blood
report to work as employes who: that replaces the old horse
have an agreement with the serum and is essentially non-
University.'' reactive.
z 1

By ANNE GERTISER

'started nine years of research,"

IN OTHER action, the Assem-
bly approved the Civil Liberties
Board (CLB) proposal for ca-
reer recruitment policy at the
University. The policy, while not
condoning discriminatory em-
ployment practices, would nev-
ertheless allow compasies with-
out affirmative action programs
to recruit on campus. The pro-
posal does not include com-
panies that are not required by,
the federal government to in-
stitute affirmative action pro-
grams.
No reference was made to em-
ployers or multi-national corpor-
ations located in foreign coun-
tries sanctioning discrimination
because "legal discrimination is
difficult to define," CLB char-
man Bruce Friedman asserted.
Furthermore, the proposal
states that relevant information
concerning a student or alum-
nus would not be released to a
prospective employer.
Friedman said the new rules
would leave room for interpre-
tation because of the "great
heterogeneity of (campus re-
cruitment) practice."

1

Roots author Alex Haley Sun-, Haley recalled.
day night urged an Eastern He detailed the trying times
Michigan University audience to he encountered while research-
rid itself of "rootlessness" and ing his family'tree. "After pour-
to "stop wasting, throwing ing over names and names it
away. one of the most precious just got monotonous. It gives
possessions you have -,the heri- me the quivers how I had al-
tage among us." ' most left the archives.
His speech was sprinkled with ; "But on the way out, I walked
childhood memories and during through a geneological room,"
the evening program, Haley re- he continied. In this room, ev-
ceived an honorary Doctor of ! eryone was bent over old docu-
Humane Letters from EMU. - ments. letters and scrolls. These
people were trying to. find out
HALEY emphasized that ev- who they were. I walked back to
ervone's heritage is thrilling the microfilms and an hour la-
and unique and said he learned ter found myself looking down
much while researching his own; at' names I had heard as a
roots. child."
"I began to realize with em- HALEY THEN urged the audi-
barrassment and shame that I ence to make an effort to dis-
had become a grown man tin- cover its roots, and to talk to
aware of the peoples and cul- its elders before it is too late.
tare of Africa. My theory of Af- I He stressed the importance of
rica had been Tarzan and , hating the elders tell every-
JIM-le Jim." he said. thing they know about their an-
Halev recounted his exneri- cestry.
ence in tracing his roots. The "I's not a one shot visit." he
days snent at his grandmother's: ,1 sinned. "One has to 'o back
had inspired him to res-arch his and ba-k and back. Write it
ancestrv. he said. His Aunt down and make as many Xerox
Georgia, vears later. made Ha- co-i-s as it takes.
ley atare of his ancestors. "Tf we dally"' he warned, "if
"SHE SPOKE of these others we let or family elders pass
not as if thev were dead but asI away it is irretrievable. We will
if thev had jest walked offstage. never know the extent of what
It was an eerie feeling as I we have lost."

GEO to vote tonight on strike

1
i
I

- ,

(Continued from Page 1)
Council member. He was allud-
ing to the fact that GEO's very
existence may be in doubt since
members have been, working
without a contract since August.
If a spring strike is opposed
by the membership, a fall strike
is GEO's major alternative

presentation of the motion to;
the fell membership.c
The meeting, however, was
closed to the press.
Last Friday, 50 GEO mem-
bers staged a rally in front of
the Administration Building to
demonstrate their desire that
the Regents force University

explosive labor relations on this
qampus," the letter stated.
Following the rally, union rep-
resentatives met in an informa-
tion session with Regents Thom-
as Roach (D-Detroit) and Sarah
Power (D-Ann Arbor) to discuss.
GEO's current situation.
"We are very pleased that

t; ----

I7

AN EXPLORATION'
INTO THE
FORCES OF LIFE

215 N. Main 0 Ann Arbor 0 663-7758
AMERICAN, DOCUMENTARIES
Robert Flaherty's NANOOK OF THE NORTH
(The 1922 film about eskimos and nature),
THE PLOW THAT BROKE THE PLAINS (the
1936 film about the history of the great
plains) and SEE IT NOW-Murrow Report
on McCarthy.
AT 9:05
Frederick Wiseman's famous HIGH SCHOOL
and LAW AND ORDER.
CINEMA GUILD OLD ARCH AEE

course of action, according to bargainers to resume negotia- the Regents took the, time to
Van Alstyme. tions quickly. In addition, un- listen to us and were concern-
ion President Doug Moran pre- ed," said Steward's Council
OPPONENTS of immediate sented the Regents with a let- member Marti Bombyk. "The
action say it is too late in the ter to express GEO's concern. best part is that we got to have
term for a. strike to be effec- "(UNIVERSITY) attempts to face to face personal contact
tive. prevent us from carrying out with the Regents.
Supporters maintain that a our function as a collective bar- Bombyk added that GEO ex-
spring strike would be easier gaining agent and to deprive pects a response from the Re-
to mobilie than one im the fall GSAs of our right to be repre- gents before this evening's
because a sense of immediacy sented by a union will cause meeting and will discuss it at
exists now. In addition, they badly strained and potentiallyl that time.
claim the sooner a strike oc-___ __ - __ __ ____

curs, the greater the element
of surprise it will carry.
The Steward's Council, which
originally proposed a spring
strike resolution on Feb. 28,
met last night, to plan tonight's

Pin. stidv for SPH -9

Announcing a Major Weekend Conference
What are these powerful forces, within us and around us, which shape the way
we look at others and at ourselves? How can they be harnessed to make life
more rewarding for ourselves, for those we serve and for those we care about?
Topics include: Y a Conference leaders:

Midwest's Largest Selection of
European Charters
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from $289
CALL 769-1776
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--- TRAVEL CONSULTANTS
216 S. 4th Ave, Ann Arbor

(Continued from Page 1) "
Center for Population Planning,
and the formation of an inter-
departmental committee toreg-
ulate the admissions and curric-
ulum of any population planning
activities in SPH.
The Curriculum Committee,
Iwith the help of members of
the DPP ReviewCommittee, al-
so reported that an "entity"
must be kept in SPH. The re-
port also outlined five areas of
teaching which ought to be re-

S
0
0
0
S

Mapping your life
Future of marriage
Sexism and sexuality
Aging
Childhood and children
The family

1811

* Carl Rogers
(Author of "On Becoming
a Person, ' "Carl Rogers on
Personal Power")
* Sam Keen
" Jacqueline Doyle
" Richard Farson
" loan Halifax
+ Leni Schwartz

-.... -.

I

I

I

April
15-17
Plymouth
Hilton
Inn.
Plymouth, MI.

Send more information on Forces of Life Conference
Name
Street Address
City State Zip
Mail to: University of Michian Extension Service,
350 S. Thayer St., nn Arbor, MI 48109; 313/764-5304 MU

I

REGISTER NOW!I
Department of Romance Languages
SUMME R ST UD IES
in SPAIN or FRANCE
Information: 4108 MLB--764-5344
Program Date: JULY 3-AUG. 29
Courses:
FRENCH or SPANISH 230
(8 weeks equals 8 U-M credits)
FRENCH or SPANISH 360
(8 weeks equals 6 U-M credits)
Participar.ts must fly as a group. Other Stu-
dents and Faculty m a y participate in t h e
round-trip flight.

I.. I

I

[CL.
J -
AVOID THE FREEZE
At I..

The Program
in American Culture
will sponsor a mini-course entitled "The History of Ethnic
Groups in Detroit, 1850-1930," to meet Wednesdays and
Fridays, from 12-1 in Room 1437 Mason Hall beginninq
Wed., March 23. Interested 'students may register on a
drop/add formn through the P'ogram Office, 164 LSA Bldg.
More information is posted in the Program Office as well as
at Checkpoint. The course will be offered by PROFESSOR
OLIVIER ZUNZ, Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology.
There IS a differenceff! (
PREPARE FOR: Y
MCAT, DATe LSATe SAT
GRE GMAT * OCAT " VAT
Dur broad range of progrbms provides an umbrella of test-
ing know-how that enables us to otter the best preparation
available, no matter which course is taken. Over 38 years
of experience and success. Small classes. Voluminous
home study materials Courses that are constantly up-
dated Permanent centers open days. evenings & week-
ends all year Complete tape facilities for review of class
lessons and for use of supplementary materials. Make-ups
for missed lessons at our centers
ECFMG FLEX
NAT'L MEDICAL & DENTAL BOARDS
Flexible Programs & Hours
W/rite or call; j
1945 PAULINE, BLVD.
ANN ARBOR 48103P
662-3)49
CAL Ts lteenly 800-221-9840 EDUCATIONAL CENTER
*S"ECsIAISS SINCE "938M

tained in the school:
* The public health aspects
of population.
* Planning, management and
evaluation of programs deliver-
ing population planning services.
0 ocial intervention and com-
munication for population plan-
ning.
O ,Doctoral level training and
research in population planning.
DISCUSSION yesterday cen-
tered on the wording and rela-
tionship of the two committees'
reports. Sylvester Berki, Chair-
man of the Curriculum Commit-
tee, explained that words such
as "entity" were purposely
"chosen to be vague" because
I of the decisions that have not
yet been made by the Academic
Affairs Office - the office now
conducting its own review pro-
cess on the department. ,
Dean Remington said that he
doesn't see "any inconsistency
between" the two reports, but
several faculty members expres-
sed concern that the Curriculum
report was more specific and
that it might not have any effect
on the procedure.
The moratorium on student
applications was lifted yester-
day as some sort of population
studies for graduate students
will be available in the fall. Ac-
cording to Remington, "There
are lots of good folks waiting
out there" for a chance to study,
population in SPH.
DPP CHAIRMAN Leslie Cor-
sa complained that since the
Academic Affairs Offices gen-
eral guidelines for program cuts
have undergone "some signifi-
cant changes" recently, DPP is
being used as a "guinea pig."
He proposed a motion that the
Governing Faculty urge the
Academic Affairs Office not to
make a final recommendation
to the Regents until the proce-
dure is finalized and applied to
_ DPP.
The motion was defeated be-
cause it would slow the process
and, according to Remington,
"thicken the plat."
SCIENCE FICTION-
FANTASY FESTIVAL
March 21-April Only
Thousands of books
by all the greatest

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Sun-March

20

Marcus Sltrave & The Mew Detroit Jazz Ensemble
Cover 2.00

a

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