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March 20, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-20

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Page Two

THE !MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, March 20, 1977

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, March 20, 1977

APRIL
GRADS!
Commencement
will be held on
April 30, 1977.
ALL CAP & GOWN orders
MUST be placed by MARCH
30.
LATE ORDERS are subject
to availability and $2 late
fee.

Black involvement as effective
as desegregation, says Bell

By SUE WARNER
Black community involvement
and leadership could be just as
effective in assuring quality ed-
ucation for black students as
integration plans, Harvard Law
professor Derrick Bell stressed
yesterday.
In the keynote address of the
day-long conference on desegre-
gation, sponsored by the Black
Law Students Alliance, Bell
said:
"A L L F E A S I B L E
routes should be taken, includ-
ing desegregation, busing, and
racial balance - but not to the
exclusion of structures, curric-
ulum, personnel and parental
involvement required to provide
the effective schooling which is
the heart of equal educational
opportunities.",
iU

BELL, who has spent the last "In the final analysis policy
20 years in the civil rights field decisions on every level are bas-
and particularly in school de- ed on self-interest," he added.
segregation activities, believes "For most white people blacks
that a review of effective all- are not a part of the self."
black schools in New York, Bos- Schools, said Bell, must con-
ton, and Chicago would provide sist of involved people who in
solutions to the problem. He turn can go into the community
urged analysis of such successes and involve parents - what he'
and their translation into "en- called "the self-help community
forcable relief and programs of type of thing."
action. "I DON'T THINK we should

BACHELOR
MASTER
DOCTOR
All orders must1
Sun. 12-5

Rental
$6.25
7.00

Rental

Deposit
$2.00

Total
$8.25

5.25 2.00 14.25

7.50 5.50 2.00 15.00
be prepaid IN FULL when placed.
Mon.-Thurs. 9-9 Sat. 1-5

"The limits on school deseg-!
regation are becoming clearer,"
Bell emphasized. "The risk of
equating desegregated schools
and effective schools is obvious.
The priorities of black parents
have been sacrificed to the ideal
of integration."
The conference was designed
to provide a forum of thought-
provoking discussion of deseg-
regation. Bell's speech came be-
tween two panel discussions,
which dealt with legal tactics
and future trends in the field.
BELL FAVORED a move
away from systematic solutions
to the integration question.
"We've tried both integration
and separation and haven't
been successful with either," he
said. "The lesson is that blacks
must rely neither on separate or
integrated schools but must
work for successful education.

ignore the effectiveness achiev-
ed in all-black schools," Bell
said. "Where we went wrong
was placing total reliance on the
full momentum of the integra-
tion process. They ca'n cheat us
just as effectively when we're
with them."
But Bell did not rule out legal
action by blacks. "Litigation
has some leverage value," he
said. "Without a city order, we
can't deal with teacher's un-
ions, for example."
"We are witnessing the close
of an era of hope and no little
accomplishment," Bell sum-
marized. "We urge a broader
theory of the Brown, decision
(Brown vs., Board of Education,
the 1956 case which outlawed
"separate but equal" schools)-
one that focuses on the equal
educational opportunity provi-
sion of that decision."

y , .

I 1

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Sports

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Council to discuss
lot repair funding

__
TAKING UNDUE
SAFETY MEASURES?
University Towers offers you 24 hour security and we are only two
blocks from main campus. 2-4-month Spring-Summer and 8-month
Fall-Winter lease reservations are now available. Call us or stop by for
more information.

..".....

U of M MEN'S GLEE CLUB
LEONARD JOHNSON, Director
PRESENTS
I Ink
ASPRING CONCERT.
APRIL 2
HILL AUDITORIUM-8:00 P.M.
For Ticket Information Call: 764-9238
BOX OFFICE OPEN MARCH 23
Extra curricular
ctivi
j,..

(Continued from Page 1)
part of the deal."
The original repair plan had
included construction of a new
parking structure with 1000 ad-
ditional parking spots and was
supported by local businessmen.
But that decision is postponed
until after the upcoming may-
pral and council elections April
4.
An administrative memo re-
porting that repairs could be fi-
nanced solely by rate increases
has also decreased support of
the program. This rate increase
would involve boosting hourly
meter rates a nickel higher to
25 cents an hour and monthly
parking rates to $25.
SOME touncilpersons said
that by raising the rates too
high, people will start avoiding
the downtown area and using the
free parking available at the
malls.
Mayor Wheeler would prefer
property owners 'to pay either
40 per cent of the cost or none
at all, leaving the entire cost to
be borne by carport users.
"THERE ARE a number of
people in the defined (special
assessment) district who don't

use cars at all," he said. "Apart-
ment owners are going to col-
lect the money for the carport
repairs in increased rent. If I
use the parking structure, -I
ought to pay for the repairs. If
you don't even own a car,
there's no reason for you to pay
for it."
According to Wheeler, two dis
tricts were created to assume
the cost for the repairs. "One of
the districts would group togeth-
er property owners in the South
University commerical area,
who would pay 60 per cent of
the $350 000 estimated cost for
repairing the First Ave. car-
port." he said. "The second
world lump together central
business district property own-
ers to pay 60 per cent of $80,000
for the Maynard structure and
$250,000 for the Fourth-Ave.-
William St. carport."

Mayor protein Louis , Belcher
(R-Fourth Ward), however, ad-
vocates the plan. "The plan is
justified unless we go to a spe-
cial assessment program where
a homeowner or an apartment
dweller would have to pay as
much as Jacobson's or any oth-
er business," Belcher said.

1

UNIV6PSITV
Corner of S. FOREST & SOUTH U.

TOWELS

OPEN POETRY READING
An opportunity to read your own poetry. An
opportunity to hear the work of student poets.
TUESDAY, MARCH 22nd
8:00 p.m.
PENDLETON ROOM
second floor, Michigan Union

761-2680

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HOW TO LOWER THE COST OF GOING TO
(AND COMING FROM) COLLEGE.

'LiJn'&~u

z

'i

: ,.

r Take Amtrak The train is a very
; " inexpensive way to go. An average
trip of 200 miles with Amtrak costs
under $17 in coach. The drinks and
food available on our trains are
inexpensive, as well.
s When you go Amtrak, traveling
time isn't wasted time. Our coach
cars are comfortable and quiet
enough for last minute cramming or
term papering, if you can resist the
social atmosphere that tends to
develop in our snack and lounge cars.
Think it over. When you're ready to give the train a try,
these people can help make the going easy for you.

l
loll

N

From one beer lover to another
THE STROH BREWERY COMPANY DETROIT MICHIGAN 48226

CONLIN TRAVEL
;;. uth University-Plymoulth Mail- mr
Wolverine Tower
Tel EN CA9-6uEO
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AitINF ORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE.

.r

MINiYWj rA

vAll 6 15V

730, sat. march

26

rackham auditorium, $3.-50 -j
v:I

The greatest collection in town of the books of: Aldiss,
Asimov, Anderson, Blish, Brackett, Bradbury, Burroughs,
Carter, Delaney, Sprague, de Camp, Ellison, Fardier,
Henderson, Herbert, Laumer, LeGuin, Leiber, Lewis, Lord,
Lovecraf't,,Moorcock, Niven, Ioriman, Norton, Mutt,
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Vnnet andi'V many others.

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IAIIh..Lim

The Robert Altman Festival presents:
FI I]OTT GItLDtnr of M*A*S*H The Long Goodbye, and California

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