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March 15, 1977 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Arts & Entertainm ent Tuesday, March 1 5, 1977 Page Five

1 I

9
SUPERB NEW TELEVISION BOOED
Gabrels.ow: Mie
By MIKE TAYLOR pected clapping. This was a with Genesis. Gabriel', use of
9pHE PLIGHT of the warm-up shame, because bands as good mime and unuual vocal effec ,t
rock'n'roll band is a great as Television need to be given were impressive the few timesu
one. As these groups are often a chance. they did crop up.p
matched with an artist bearing The star of the show, -1 e t e r Il dconcert opene with Gab-
no similarity to them in style,I Gabriel, is having proolems of riel playing "Here Comes thet
they are usually lucky if they his own. The leader and I e a d Flood" softly on the piano. No-0
are not booed off the stage, singer of Genesis until rwo years bert Fripp, the legendary :rutar-s
hardly a sign of encouragement ago, it will be a while before he ist best known as King Crirn-;
for a group just starting out, draws the crowds that row son's former leader and for h'
This has happened before when come to Genesis concerts; w;e avante-garde music making with
bands like Mott the Hoople and their show last month at Ma- Brian Eno, soon joined in to
Yes were unknown, and it hap- sonic Temple was sold out, Ga- make it 'a duet. The rest of thec
pened at Sunday night's Peer briel drew so few that the bal- band, which included Synergy'sf
Gabriel concert at Masonic cony had to be closed off. Nev- synthesizer whiz Larry Fast and
Temple to Television, New ertheless, he gave-a fine show, guitarist Steve Hunter, m o s t
York's premier punk rock band. even if it was not without flaws. recently of Lou Reed and Aliz
Playing a few songs from PLAYING with most of the Cooper fame, entered net. In-c
their superb debut album, Mar- musicians who grace his mar- stead of finishing the song, ho-
quee Moon, Television proved velous new solo album, Peter ever, they went on t> performf
that the energy and dynamics Gabriel, he filled the evening what was to be the first of sev-
that once made the Rolling with much of the musical diver- eral new songs playeR dling the
Stones and the Who great was sity and innovation that has evening.
not lost forever. Unfortunately, characterized his work through- Fripp's role on the stage was
for their efforts they received out the years. Although the a pzling one. Sitting virtuallyr
boos, catcalls, and general si- stage show was not set up to par motionless on a stool so far off
lence where one would have ex- with his previous performances' to the right that most of the
audience couldn't even see nim,;
he was introduced as "Dusty
'Rhodes". He played sparingly,
1S , Layperson. as did everyone else in the band.
Critics, and No one seemed to be comptuig
i.for the spotlight; while this led
Meg Christian to much excellent instrumental
(A si e ) tu-interplay, it also created a feel-!
--------L-O-S JOSIMOVICH ing of listlessness at times.
I HAVE OFTENED WONDERED what prompts people who ALTHOUGH he performed all
know little or nothing about the daily workings of a stu- the songs from the new album
dent newspaper to advise its editors on technical matters. by not playing any Genesis tune
This problem crops up continuously concernimg The Daily until the encore, and then he did
arts page, which is the object of endless criticism from per- only one, "Back in New York
formers, public relations people and other highly cultured City". This was especially JY-
specimens. tirbing considering the short-
Most of these technical complaints center around the prob- ness of the concert. Gabriel
lem of 'too little, too late' reviews of various concerts. In this could easily have performed'
morning's paper, for example, I am accused of being 'irre- more of the material the au-
sponsible' for running a play review four days after the event. ience wanted to hear, but op-
WHAT CRITICS FAIL TO RECOGNIZE is two rather infinite parently he just didn't want to.
limitations working against the arts page - time and space. However, the combination of
First, a word about deadlines. Arts copy is expected to Gabriel's terrific songsand the
be sent to the typesetters by 6 p.m. the day before it is to many talents of the band mern-
run. Occasionally we are allowed to go as late as 11,but thisb roll. "Modern Love", a scorocner
causes problems of coordination with the news and other de- on record, came off even more
partments, whose deadline for sending copy is about 1 a.m. powerfully in concert. Gabriel's
Unfortunately for all you culture buffs, arts events usually' rendition of the Kinks clasic "All
occur between the hours of 8 and 11 at night. Logic, then, Day and All of the Night" was
excludes the possibility of an arts review running the day another highlight as he ran men-
after the performance. "Aha," you say, "but couldn't you acingly around the stage beore'
run it the next day?" The answer is usually yes, and we do. a nightmarish backdrop of musi-
But there is another problem. There is no arts page on Sat- cians.
urday, Sunday or Monday. So if something happens on Thurs-
day night, its impossible to review it before Tuesday unless
there is extra room somewhere in Saturday's paper, which
there usually isn't. Ditto for Friday, Saturday and Sunday shows,
which make up the bulk of Ann Arbor arts events.
SO MUCH FOR TIME. But cramped space is just as fre-
quent a cause for frustration. Basically, the ads get put in
first, and whatever is left over has to be filled with stories.
Since so many things happen on weekends, a small page on
Tuesday often results in holding a story which should have
run then until the next day. Priority is given to what are also:
seen as the major stories, and many reviews have to be cut
to the bare bones. This is a sad but basic fact of newspaper Donald B
routine.
I hope that this brief explanation will deter at least one
well-meaning person from complaining about problems that SU
cannot be helped.flT

2l

film

fest:

Innovative antics

By C. S. NICHOLS The genre's label is not as im- ± and sound techniques are ex-' corn are passed between season
portant as its form and intent. I pldred, stretched, refined. Fa- ticket holders and judges who
t")R THE NEXT six days, Certain characteristics define' miliar film tems such as plot, will sit through over 40 hours of
the Old Architecture Audi- the experimental film; these characterization, and dialogue films this week. By Saturday;
orium screen will put aside its are flexible, but remain a ; are usually abandoned. Sexual, evening, their blood-shot eyes
usual nostalgic, movie fare to framework for the filmmaker, political, and social norms are %ill betray an 'altered state of
present strange and new things'. viewer, and critic. examined, often attacked and consciousness, a film overdose
A different audience will"fill Experimental films are an al-, ridiculed. The films can be vio-
he seats, including filmmakers, ternative and, in many cases a lent, vague, or pornographic to
out-of-town critics, and cinema rebellion against "commercial" "get the point across - some
Scholars. A number of curious I Hollywood movies. They are us- are frankly outrageous and dis-
students will probably come to ; ually shorter than feature-length gusting. Others are fantastic or
see if the 15th Ann Arbor Film films, because the filmmakers poetic. The overall result:' ex-
Festival will present material are usually financing their films perimental film, an eclectic and
as provocative as the nude wo- themselves, or with limited as- fertile form of art.
map pictured on the Festival sistance. The Ann Arbor Film Festival
poster. TAc a ar fp is one of the country's oldest
kU~I~ au~ jicii~~ ax ' n '" dmsi

that makes everything look like
a movie. It's worth it, even for
all the disappointing entries
that may crop up. At 40 hours,
or at any fraction you may see,
the Ann Arbor Film Festival is
a very special experience.

..

71

To the curious and uninitiat- cl
ad, the films will be more be- e
tvildering than provacative, for m
experimental cinema is too eas- i
ly misunderstood by those un- h
familiar with it. However, a
learning the basics of the me- T
dium, and keeping an open mind fi
will make the show enjoyable, di
and you'll probably go back for
more.
to
"IEXPI E RIMlE NTAL" ti
film is synonymous with "avant- m
garde" and "independent" film. a

poked by a tight budget. How- and most important experiment-
ver, financial independence lal film competitions. This year,
eans the filmmaker is ac- ,over 400 films were submitted
or from across the country, and a
nrse nly, thimselfms screening committee has picked
erself hence, the film becomes apoiaey10frpbi
highly personal expression. approximately 150 for public
he goal is not to bring box .- viewing. Judges will distribute
'e realipsno tbrinese xof--over $1500 in prize money to the
ye receipts or please an au-! winning films.
fence, but to express oneself.
The Festival is rich in ritual
TIE EXPRESSION and con- as well as film. Unique live en-

Ire

'a

ent are often rebellious anima-
on, pixillation, slow and fast
notion, computer graphics -
11 kinds of unconventional film

tertainment opens each screen-
ing. Coffee thermoses and pop-
Independent study programs in
17 countries around the world!
COLLEGE
SEMESTER
ABROAD
Unique program for adaing
dimension to your educa-
tion and developing per-
sonal initiative: orienta-
tion, languages, in-country
homestay, contemporary
I culture seminar, indepen-
dent study project. Apply
now.
The Experiment's
School for International Training
BRATLEBORO. VERMONT 05301
inqures Olt ce 4

TUESDAY, MARCH 15
Hope you had a good Spring Break and are ready to
haul in the last half of the semester . . . better save
time from papers and studies to fit in some concerts.
Some of the shows we have been working towards all
semester are beginning to finalize.
Tickets went on sale yesterday for the March 27th con-
cert starring RUFUS featuring Chaka Khan and special
guest stars Donald Byrd and the Blackbyrds. And tomor-
row tickets go on sale at 9:30 a.m. for Harry Chapin
who will perform the entire show in Hill Auditorium on
Friday, April 1st (no foolin'). Our box office is located
in the lobby of the Michigan Union. Five more major
concerts are scheduled for April and May and as soon
as contracts are finalized you'll be hearing about them.
A special FLASH column will run in the Daily this Thurs-
day in conjunction with a press conference Thursday
morning to announce a big name concert which will
go on sale this Saturday morning at Crisler Arena (all
this secrecy at request of the performer's management).
Suibscribe to The Daily-Phone 764-0558

ums
hakl

fcatit ,4
akhan

yrd & the Blackbyrds
NDAY, MARCH 27th
SLER ARENA-8 p.m.
ESERVED SEATS $7 and $6

ON ANOTHER SUBJECT, The Daily arts staff - myself in
particular - would like to reiterate its disapproval of
singer Meg Christian's policy excluding male reviewers and
interviewers at her concerts. Meg, who will be doing a bene-
fit concert with Holly Near this weekend for the VA nurses,
is an excellent and interesting performer. Her politics-using
the term loosely-make John Foster Dulles look conciliatory.
WHAT'S COOKING?
MARCH 17, 24, 31, APR. 7
BASIC FRENCH COOKING, 1-3, Thursdays.
Thru the Ann Arbor Y.
MARCH 16, WED.
Mini-Class QUICHE, 12:30-1 :00. FREE.I
MARCH 18, FRI.
Intermed. BREAD WORKSHOP, 7:30-9:30.
$10.00. Bring a bag lunch.
MARCH 24, THURS.
AN EASTER BRUNCH, 7:30-9:30. $4.00.
MARCH 30, WED.
Mini-Class HOW TO USE YOUR KNIVES,
12:30-1 :00. FREE.
MARCH 30, WED.
PASSOVER DESSERTS, 7:30-9:30. $4.00.
COMING UP IN APRIL AND MAY:
APRIL 6, WED.
MEXICAN COOKING, 7:30-9:30. $4.00.
APRIL 16, FRI.
UKRANIAN E G G DECORATING, All Day.
FREE.
APRIL 14, WED.
A MEDIEVAL EVENT! Prof. Mermier will lec-
ture on Medieval Gastronomy, "AVANT " LA
FOURCHETTE"
MAY 3, TUES.
Dr. Virginia Roberts will cook authentic ME-

It -J 1
K]

Tickets on sale at the Michigan Union Box Office 11:30-5:30 M-F.

Sorry, no
Hudson's,
Ypsilanti.

personal checks. 763-2071. Tickets also available at all
Huckleberry Party Store and Wherchouse Records in

1
1
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3
s
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I

U of M MEN'S GLEE CLUB
LEONARD JOHNSON, Director
PRESENTS
SPRING COiCERT
APRIL 2
HILL AUDITORIUM-8:00 P.M.
For Ticket Information Call: 764-9238
BOX OFFICE OPEN MARCH 23

A MAJOR EVLEN'TS OFIC EPRESENTAIION

~~rib
1 ,.rI LS7--"{ " ,, .
Li~ ~ .4R
<2f,

TUESDAY, MARCH 15TH
8:00 P.M. 203 Tappon Hall
"Recent Archaeological
Discoveries in Jerusalem:
The convergence of Christianity
and Islam"
Miriam Rosen-Avalon, Hebrew
University (visiting at Princeton)
Sponsors: History of Art
Judaic Studies
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16TH
4:00 P.M. 451 Mason Hall
"The Sanctity of the Holy Land
in Islamic Tradition"
Emanuel Sivan, Hebrew
University ( visiting at Montreal)
Response: Andrew Ehrenkreutz,
University of Michigan, on
Crusader attitudes toward
the Holy Land.
Sponsors: History
Judaic Studies
8:00 P.M. Hillel, 1429 Hill
"The Sanctity of Israel in
Jewish Tradition"
Abraham Halkin, University
of California, Berkeley
Sponsors: History
Judaic Studies

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