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March 04, 1977 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, March 4, 1977

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Trony,
TUto
settle
(Continued from Page 1)
they will have five days to fix
it. If the ruling is against the
tenant, they may file a griev-
ance;
* Common living areas in all
houses and apartments are to
be cleaned at least once a week.
The contract will last until
January 26, 1978.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Bargainers given
free rein by union

GENESIS
"British folk, King Crimson-style space music, jazz
roc k . "
-ROLLING STONE, Feb. 24, '77
'g~~j.,,, ..r.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... ....'...:Y.: i ::
~ ~
t{
4 F
W
nh
ATCO
540 E. LIBERTY-LBERTY CENTRE
EntranCeornmer of Liberty and May nort
ABOVE BURGER KING
MON.-THUR. 10-10, FRI. & SAT 10-12 MriON(GHT,
SUNDAY >2-6
TWO LOCATIONS INsANN AR BOR
300 S. STATE-665-3679
1235 . UNIVERSITY-668-9866
HOURS: 10-9 MON.-SAT., 12-6 SUN.

(Continued from Page 1)
the strike as quickly as possible
continued to mount.
The Washtenaw County Demo-
cratic Party last night over-
whelmingly voted to support the
AFSCME local in its strike.
The party urged the Univer-
sity to "adopt a stance more .in
line" with AFSCME's'demands.
The Democrats further re-
quested that, "until such a set-
tlement is reached, the Board of
Regents cease the use of scab
labor and refrain from putting
police in the position acting as
strikebreakers."
THEY ALSO noted that the
University is acquiring a union-
busting reputation.
A committee has been set up
by the Democrats to look into
present labor practices.
In addition, a group of clergy,
faculty and other area residents
calling themselves the Commit-
tee for a Just Settlement yester-
day criticized the University's
handling of the walkout.
The group said they are
"deeply disturbed by . . . ac-
tions that appear to be aimed
SIX
WAYS,
TO
GET A
FASTER
R EF UND
ONE
Check
ycur math.
TWO
Use the right
schedule
or tax tabie.
THREE
Use the peel-off
label and
preaddressed
envelope.
FOUR
Include
all W-2 forms.
FIVE
Attach all
supporting
schedules.
Sign your return.
On a joint return
both should sign.
Internal Revenue Service

more at breaking the strike than
at negotiating a fair contract
settlement."
BUT UNIVERSITY Vice Pres-
ident for Financial Affairs
James Brinkerhoff noted last
night that "the employes are il-
legally absent from their jobs."
"We have no premeditated
conviction that the strike has toE
go on," he said. "I am extreme-
ly concerned about the employes
. . . I certainly don't know the
financial welfare of each . . . I.
will grant that their wages are
low, but it's a matter of work
being performed."
Local 1583's sister unions - in
the area, as well, have an-
nouncedatheir anger over the
campus walkout.
Today at noon, AFSCME pick-
eters and officials from sympa-
thetic unions will meet for a
demonstration in front of the
Administration Building.
Even though contract negocia-'
tions may begin again as soon
as next week, there is no guar-
antee that the AFSCME strike
will be over by the time students
return from their spring break
on March 14.
Both sides have emphasized
that they are prepared for a
long strike.

Lettuce bc
continue i
By PATTY MON
The Housing Office will co
Farm Workers lettuce for cafet
University Housing Judiciary (U
earlier University Housing Coun
tinue the five-year non-unionl
Today, the sole UHJ justice,
Housing Director John Feldkam
The Housing Office will stand t
cording to Feldkamp, because
with the University Housing Co
HOLLAND RULED last wee
continuing the lettuce boycott af
visory referendum favored endin
The ruling, stemming from;
Morton, said that UHC was bour
cember student mandate. UHC'
question was only advisory and
Holland said that although Ul
the referendum was non-binding,
UHC had a chance to appea
Central Student Judiciary (CSJ)
ing Freeman, a non-UHC memt
behalf, failed to appear before
"didn't have the time."
FREEMAN SAID he doubt
have any impact. Freeman said
with CSJ after spring break.
Holland contended his deci
Housing Office to end the boyc
choice."
IU

ycott to Wheeler,
n dorms Beicher
[TEMURRI
ntinue to buy only United
:eria saladl bars, despite a
HJ) ruling that invalidates (Continued from Page 1)
cil (UHC) decisions to con-
lettuce boycott. Wheeler then attacked Repub-
Jim Holland, plans to tell lican plans to raise $5 million for
p that the boycott is over. street repair through a bond is-
by the UHC decisions, ac- sue. He called the request "irre-
"my agreement is to work sponsible and dishonest," be-
uncil." cause he said it would cost much
more.
ek that UHC was wrong in City residents will vote on the
ter December's student ad- bond issue on April 4.
gg it by a two-to-one margin. Belch'er said the environmen-
a suit filed by student Bob tal issue is one which deserves
nd to the results of the De- more attention, and cited his
had argued that the ballot
not binding, plan to relieve Ann Arbor's gar-
MC noted in its minutes that bage disposal problem. "We are
stdnsthought otherwise. running out of landfill area
students tin (the next) five years" and
al Holland's decision to the he proposed a solid waste ener-
Wednesday night. But Irv- gy recovery system to remedy
ber acting on the council's the problem.
CSJ Wednesday because he
BUT WHEELER said the fea-
sibility of the plan was in seri-
ted Holland's decision will ousdoubt because a Washtenaw
e Hplansodileanappeall County study indicated that the
he plans to file an appeal largest potential user - the Uni-
versity - would not participate.
sion doesn't authorize the Wheeler then attacked Bel-
ott, "it only gives them a cher's environmental stand and
cited his opponent's support of
parking structures. Wheeler-said
they "invite auto pollution."
Public Health school
studies DPP options

-

The Eastern Michigan Office of Campus Life I
Presents the CONCERT PERFORMANCE of
Don Cherry and Oregon
March 5, 1977-8:00 p.m.
Pease Auditorium
For further info-(313) 487-3045
$4.50 TICKETS AVAILABLE:
IN ANN ARBOR:
SCHOOL KIDS RECORDS
BONZO DOG RECORDS
YPSILANTI:
WHEREHOUSE RECORDS
EAST LANSING:
WHEREHOUSE II
Division of Student Affairs
PETITIONS FOR
STUDENT PRESIDENT
OF THE
MICHIGAN UNION
NOW AVAILABLE AT THE
MICHIGAN UNION
LSA I N FO, DESK
OFFICES FOR STUDENT SERVICES

(Continued from Page 1)
headway in exploring alterna-
tives in eliminating the po
pr-}gram.
1aProfessorGeorge Simons, who
has been attending all of the
meetings as a member of both
the DPP faculty and the execu-
tive committee, reports that the
"tone" of the meetings has been
good.
HE OUTLINED the alterna-
tives:
! keeping the department
with the improvements recom-
mended by the Review Com-
mittee;
* creating a new Center for
'Population Planning under the
dean;
" moving the department to
another school like Education,
Natural Resources, or the Insti-
tute for Policy Studies;
* merging with the Maternal
and Child Health (MCH) pro-
gram;
0 moving within SPH into an-
other department;
* dispersing tenured faculty
to other departments with teach-
ing duties.
" dispersing the tenured fac-
ulty to other departments where
they will engage in non-teach-
ing duties.
DPP student Eileen Tell says
that the proposed merger with
the similarily doomed MCH "is

"Realgood
a...Gkinyi of a...
uhh...ouhv
maelike a
know.0.uhb6.
GayGraser U. of M. '77, replies to the
question, "What does Genesee Cream Ale
really taste like?"

exciting the students in a lot of
ways." Winnie Willis, associate
MCH professor, says that al-
though the departments "need
to get on top of the table" to
discuss the consolidation, she
supports the idea.
But Jason Finkle, DPP pro-
fessor, is wary of review by the
dean or the Academic Affairs
Office. "This is going to be re-
solved politically rather than
rationally," he explains. "Only
the choices palatable to the dean
and the administration will be
used."
Congress
clears
way for
tax. cuts
(Continued from Page 1)
comes up for debate next week,
an early vote is expected on
a Republican effort to shelve
the Carter rebate plan and sub-
stitute an $11-billion across-the-
board permanent tax cut.
That reduction would help all
taxpayers, but a share of bene-
fits greater than Democrats pre-
fer would go to families above
the $20,000-income level.
Republicans contend the re-
bate is a wasteful and ineffec-
tive way of creating jobs. But
Democrats favor the rebate be-
cause it is a one-shot provi-
sion that would not continue to
drain the treasury of money
needed to finance such social
programs as national health in-
surance.
Democrats say their stimulus
plan would create one million
jobs and cut unemployment this
year from the current 7.3 per
cent level to about 7 per cent.
That would mean a growth in
the economy of about 6 per cent,
with no unusual increases in in-
flation, economists say.
GOP strategists concede their
program would require longer
to take effect but say the jos
it would create would be more
lasting than those that arise
from the Democratic plan.
The consideration of economic
stimulation is taking longer than
in the Dast because of new
congressional procedures aimed
at giving the lawmakers great-
er control over federal spend-
The new law requires that
Congress amend the budget
adoted last September before
it can approve any decreases
in taxes or increases in fed-
eral sending. That was the
amendment aoroved by both
the Senate and House yesterday.
OVER-POWERED
JOPLIN, Mo. (AP) - Mis-
souri has energy to spare -
abot 10.000 years worth.
In 1975, 85 per cent of the
state's electric power cme
from coal (compared to 45 per
cent for the U.S. average) and

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