100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 03, 1977 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, !March 3, 1977,

THE MICHIGAN, DAILY

Page Three

Thursday, March 3, 1977 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

_--7-

Trapped Pa.

miner found

Advisory group predicts riots

TOWER CITY, Pa. (J)-Voice
contact was made yesterday
with one of eight miners trapped
since midday Tuesday inside a
flooded coal mine, a mining of-
ficial said.
There was no word on the.oth-
er seven miners entombed a
mile inside a 400-foot mountain
in the heart of Pennsylvania's
hard coal region.
RESCUERS bored through 60
feet of solid anthracite, then
spliced a one-and-a-quarter inch
pipe capped at the end to keep
out dirt. Deep inside the moun-
tain, at the other end of the
pipe, miner Ronald Adley re-
moved the cap and told rescuers
he was alive.
The searchers had heard a
tapping noise as they assembled
the pipe. It was 'the first sign
of life from inside the pitch-
black mine where 10 miners
were trapped at midday Tues-
day when a torrent of water
flooded in through a tunnel in
the Kocher Coal Co. mine.
So far, two bodies have been
found.,
THE MEN who made contact
with Adley fed juice to the 37--
year-old miner through the
same pipe used to confirm he
was alive.
At the mine entrance, where
relatives of the trapped men
kept vigils, Adley's mother and
sister hugged each other.
"They talked to him!" said
Carol Krieser, Adley's sister.
"THEY HEARD sounds at
first," said Adley's brother-in-
law, Steve Kafora. "Then he
gave his name. There's no
doubt."
Kafora said he knew Adley
would be safe because he

worked in an area that would abandoned shafts that over the car, from the mine and load-
have been on high ground when years have filled with rain. ed it into a station wagon.
the water broke through. Tons "We had a breakthrough of Many of the relatives of the
of coal, debris and shattered impounded water," said Leon men 'still inside kept their vigil
timber block Adley's route to Richter, a Kocher vice presi- in a washhouse where their
freedom. dent. "We don't know where it loved ones. normally cleaned up
"They're trying to dig through came from." I before coming home for supper.
the coal to that part of the Miner John Morgan was in Two ambulances were parked
mine," said Jack Tisdale, an of- the next base and climbed up outside.
ficial of the federal Mining 60 feet 'til we couldn't go any Earlier rescuers had inched
Enforcement and Safety Admin- higher. As fast as you could their way underground through
istration. the rock and debris said they
after you. I never thought it heard noises that sounded like
WITH THE fate of the other would come that high. I came "rapping on coal."
seven miners still unknown, Tis- to upside down."ap onfcaa"
dale said: "We don't know for Safety officials at first said
sure there is anybody else WATER WAS STILL chest deep they could not be sure the noises
there." in some parts of the mine yes- came from the trapped men, but
The body of 50-year-old Philip terday, hampering the teams of 1 the news lifted spirits of rela-
Sabatino was discovered short- miners and federal and state tives who had been maintain-
ly after a rescue team inside investigators digging through ing a vigil since the disaster
the mine dynamited a wall of splintered 'timber and mud. struck.
debris that had dammed a pool Most of the water dispersed "There's tapping. That means
of water blocking their progress throughout the network of tun- there's hope,' said Colleen Shof-
into the shaft. nels, but some was still trapped fler, daughter of one of the
A federal official had said as in low spots blocking the res- eight men still missing.
early as Tuesday night that it cue teams. Workers stepped up their ef-
was "very unlikely" that seven "You ever hear Niagara forts to bore through 80 feet
men still missing would be found Falls?" asked a miner who also of rock and earth to establish
alive. was underground when the great a communication line after
wave hit, generating a whipping1 hearing the noises.
"BUT WE'RE STILL hunting wind through the shaft. "Well,
and we're still hoping," said it was worse than that," said
John Shutack, another official the miner, who identified him- Three dirigibles built by thel
with the federal Mining Enforce- self only as Larry. United States - the Shenan-
mer.t and Safety Administration. Asked what he did, he replied, doah, Akron and Macon 1- all
Three other miners were seri- "You run. You run faster than crashed. A huge hangar, usedk
o.sly injured about mid-day hell." to house them when they were
Tuesday when the wave of wa- ABOUT A DOZEN miners es- on the Pacific Coast, still stands
ter raced through a tunnel of corted Sabatino's body, draped and is in use at Moffett Field,I
the Kocher Co. in the heart of in canvas and ferried in a coal near San Jose, Calif.
the state's anthracite region, 40---~--~----
miles northeast of Harrisburg. -WT 1 A

i
z
1
i
1
i
I
t

WASHINGTON (UPI) - A al Justice Standards and Goals,
government task force said to- said, "the task force set out to!
day the urban rioting of the prepare for the worst."
1960y theourecurtandrg te It detailed 100 "standards and;
1960s could recur and urged goals" in a 660-page report in-
communities to make contingen- tended to help small communi-
cy plans against disorder and ties cope with civil disorders
terrorism. and terrorism.
Recommendations included It recommended, for example,
wiretapping, mass arrests and that police be immune from
granting police immunity from criminal and civil liability for
prosecution or suit for emergen- emergency actions taken in good
cy actions done in good faith. faith.A
"THE PRESENT tranquility ASKED whether that might'
is deceptive," the task force not encourage brutality, Byrne'
said in a report td Attorney Gen- said, "The law enforcement of-
eral Griffin Bell. "Many of the ficer having to make a difficult
traditional indicators for disor- decision ought not to have to
ders are clearly present and make it in terms of what is
need but little stimulus to acti- safer for him in terms of a pos-
vate them." ,,,ible civil suit for a good faith
But Jerry Wilson, the former judgment, even if it's wrong."
Washington, D.C., police chief The report also endorsed wire-
who headed the Justice Depart- tapping to discover impending
ment Task Force on Disorders disorders or terrorism. Asked
and Terrorism, presented a far if that might not revive the
rosier picture at a news brief- widespread wiretapping abuses
ing. of the past, Byrne replied. "I'
"Our task force did not see! don't think we advocated wide-
any increased potential for wide- snread wiretapping. I think we
spread urban disorders at this recognize it as a tool."
time." Wilson said. "In fact, ' Wilson said the taps would re-
the contrary is true, for the quire "close judicial supervi-I
next few years. The mood of the sion."
country at this time is good." ;.
TAT' YVORT ln inrl d d

1971 internment of some 7,0001
May Day antiwar demonstratorsj
in Washington while he was po-
lice chief.1
"In civil disorders generally,

there should be no mass ar-
rests," Wilson said. He said the
report simply recognizes the
technique as a possibility ir,
some situations.

I
t
Il
S
Ci
'P
t]
Z
s
U
u
v
p
I
v

U' eys phone plan
(Continued from Page 1) number to get through to Se.,
noney has yet been allocated.jcurity.
"I'm hoping other units will WAYNE'S Director of Safety
:ontribute," Foulke said. "I'd Dallas Schneider emphasized
ike to see housing and the hos- that in addition to the increased
dital contribute. When you put access to phones, the psychologi-
he two together, it is half the cal factor for students of feel-
University." ing safer is important.
"The main factor is psycho-
FOULKE explained that the logical in terms of knowing
success of the system depends emergency assistance is avail-
)ncssatheylaemeendstheable no matter where you are
>n strategic placement of the on campus," he said.
inits. "Phones should be placed Referring to the "blue light"
where there is a good traffic which highlights the phones at
pattern and security surveil- WSU. Cook added, "We need to
ance," he said. Foulke also designate places well. Paint
tressed the importance of poles red and put a light on.
>hones remaining free from van- them. Make it as common as a
dalism. traffic signal and everyone
Foulke, a member of the Uni- would know where it's at."
versity Personal Safety Aware-
ness Committee, said that his FOULKE said he was particu-
:ommittee, designed to educate larly interested in having hous-
Jniversity members, strongly ing financially support the sys-
upports the system. tem so that he could have some
Davids is optimistic about the say in phone placement around
ystem in part because of the campus. Foulke pointed to areas
uccess Detroit's Wayne State such as the crosswalk bridge to
University (WSU) has had-with' the "Hill" dorm area and North
ts "blue light" system since Campus as places in need of
1970. Its 122,phone system op- more security.
erates through the campus "cen- Cook said he was particularly
rex" telephone system where a concerned about the Women's
person has to dial a specific Hospital parking structure.

ij
{
i

The water may have climbe
as high as 60 feet up the slant
ing tunnel after breaking throug
from a cavity in the rock o
from an adjacent, adandone
mine shaft.
THE MINE BURROWS int
400-foot-high Keppler's Moun
tain, which is honeycombed wit

Union, 'U' differ
on effects of strike
(Continued from Page 1) the walkout lasts that long "w
notify picketers when emergen- will have learned to cope wit
cy supplies were coming the situation better. We expe
cyuh ple wemany (union members) to com
Such efforts have not received back to work by then."
-much cooperation from hospital Block admits that many built
officials, AFSCME representa- ings will have a chance to stoc]
fiilssaid Ct pile supplies over the brea
but he said "they need othe
AT DORMITORIES, admini- things."
strators and supervisors say Specifically, he said, the can
that conditions are "very near pus needs people to maintai
normal.' Students, resident staff its operations.:
and even secretaries from cen-
tral campus offices have been THE UNION'S morale appear
recruited to fill in for striking high. No significant numbers(
AFSCME employes. AFSCME employes have "returr
"Many of the students are ed to their jobs as of yet, an
cleaning up after themselves," AFSCME lines boast an ave
one dorm supervisor said. age of 5 to 10 picketers in e
In most dorms, food supplies ery location.
are still arriving, and garbage The individual strikers too-
is 'being picked up as usual. both young and old - appez
ready for a long strike.
"IF WE WANTED to stop "When we first went out, u
supplies from coming in, we figured we'd be out until afte
could," Block argued. "It's only the spring break," one strike
because we've decided, to be said. "Workers knew what th
passive" that the food arrives, were getting into and are n
Block also said that the Uni- worried."
versity "is using its power to ATTEMPTS AT negotiatio
prevent health officials from between the two parties earli(
coming in and closing down" this week failed when a sta
many of the buildings. mediator found the Universi
It's not clear yet whether and AFSCME too far apart (
AFSCME will still be on strike wage offers to justify furthi
when skudents return from their discussion.
spring break on March 14. No furture contract talks ha'
REISTER BELIEVES that if been scheduled.

d
h VA ury selet
,d DETROIT (UPI) - The num-; July and August, 1975. Two of
ber of tentative jurors jumped the victims died.
0o to 11 yesterday in the trial of As with prospects interviewed,
n- in the first day of the trial
h two Filipino nurses charged with Tuesday, Pratt spent more than!
- poisoning nine local Veterans a half hour with each individual,
Administration Hospital patients ,asking questions on a wide
in 1975. range of topics to find any pos-
The careful questioning by -- - --
U.S.' District Judge Philip Pratt MISSOURI TRANSIT
produced five new jury pros- JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. -
pects in the second day of se- '
lection. But attorneys said the Due to its centrality as the U.S.
final 12 jurors and four alter- crossroads in terms of location
e nates probably won't be deter- and population, Missouri's trans-I
mined before next week. nortation system is a significant
factor in beckoning new and ex-
Ac FILIPINA Narciso, 32, and panding industry.

THE REPK also inciuu s
NEW JERSEY Gov. Brendan provision for mass arrests. Re-
Byrne, chairman of the National porters reminded Wilson of the
S
Advisory Committee on Crimin- controversy generated by theI
S
g i
-i
ion continues
:t
sible reasons for keeping them! counts of murder, 19 counts of
off the jury. poisoning and one count of con-
spiracy. The charges were later
QUESTIONS centered on mil- dropped and the nurses were in-
itary background, attitudes to- dicted again last month.
ward Filipinos and other Asians, The case has stirred great in-
experiences with hospitals and terest in the Philippines, the
whether the trial, which could a nurses' homeland, and some;
last four months, would cause a $60,000 has been raised there I
hardship for the juror. for the defense, according to a
Government and defense at- defense spokesperson.
torneys refused to comment on The Philippine governmentI
their impressions of the jury un- has sent an official observer to!
til the full panel is selected. the trial here, Bienvenido Llan-
The nurses, who have lived in eta, assistant Philippine consul
the United- States for about six; general in Chicago.
years. are charged with two I-----__

m

re'
A-
k-
ik,
er
t-
iin
ors
Of
nd
sr-
;v-
we
er
er
Bey
lot
ins
ier
ite
ity
on
ier
ive

Leonora Perez, 30, returned for
a second day in court with their;
parents, other relatives and
friends sitting behind them.
The two nurses were indicted'
by a federal grand jury last!
June for allegedly injecting Pav-!
ulon, a powerful muscle relax-!
ant, into intensive care patients
at the Ann Arbor hospital in

It claims the nation's busiest
port on the inland waterways
(St. Louis handles 18-20 million
tons of cargo annually); two in-
ternational airports (St. Louis
and Kansas City); 3,200 com-
mon carrier truck lines and the
second - and third busiest rail
centers (St. Louis and Kansas
City) in the U.S.

counts of murder, seven counts
of poisoning, and one count of
conspiracy to harm patients.
THE DEFENDANTS were ori-
ginally indicted last June after
an 18-month investigation by the
Federal 'Bureau of Investigation.
The original charges were five

SPECIAL PERFORMANCE"
SALEM
WwITCH-
CRAFT
THURS., MARCH 3
SWEET CRYSTAL
FRI. and SAT.
at the
SURE THING
327 MICHIGAN
Ypsi.
482-7130

I

ANAUUICU [ELM CC-C~4DE
Tonight in Auditorium A, Angell Hall
"AGU IR RE, WRATH OF GOD"
WERNER HERZOG 1971
The story concerns the descent into the madness of a 16th century
Spanish conquistador in search of gold. Peru's mysterious jungle
proves the perfect set for Herzog's cinematic poetry, visualizing a
concern for the individual at odds with his world. "There are
many memorable moments, most particularly the final shot of
a lone figure Aguirre ranting on a raft as hordes of monkeys
clamber over the timbers-as potent a visualization of madness
as one might wish for."- Flm and Filming Ann Arbor Premiere.
"werner Herzog is the greatest filmmaker alive and making films
today."-Francois Truffaut. German with subtitles.
Showtimes are 7, 8:45, & 10:30
Admission-$1.50
Friday, Mar. 4 in MLB-
"THE PINK PANTER"
AND
"THE RETURN OF THE
PINK PANTHER"
Saturday, Mar. 5 in MLB-
"MORGAN!"
"THE BED-SITTING ROOM"
"(LOVES OF) ISADORA"
"KING OF HEARTS"

CELEBRATE
YOUR BIRTHDAY
WIT H US
PRETZEL BELL

U

pw

IF II L/flI
*~C 1197 ILfL4
SCREENING INFORMATION:
Screenings are held in the old Architecture and Design Auditorium at 7:00, 9:00, 11:00 p.m. daily-
1:00, 7:00, 9:00 p.m. on Saturday. Winners and highlights are screened on Sunday at 7:00, 9:00,
11:00 p.m. in both the old Architecture and Design Auditorium and Auditorium A of Angell Hall.
Single admission is $1.25. Series: $16.00. Advance sales begin at 6:00 p.m. for that day only.Series
tickets are on sale on Tuesday, March 15th at 5:30 p.m.
I ,INi IQ YURAI 1//IV111YHS.I:
I1 1|131|N H

INSTITUTE
OF SLAVIC
STUDIES
WRITE:
Reoistrar, ISS
P.O. Box 1 122
Wheaton, Ill.
60187

THE INSTITUTE OF
SLAVIC STUDIES

offers graduate opportunities related
to Eastern Europe and Russia for
qualified Christian personnel.
" Studies in lanquage, culture, and
Christian missions a m o n q the
Slavic peoples of the world
" Experience in researching East-
ern Europe
" Traininq in radio broadcastinq
and writing for Eastern Europe
and Russia
" Learninq methods of Evangelism
and Christian disciplinqi

Daily Classifieds
Get Results

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN FOR
THE 1977-78 SCHOOL YEAR

An Evening of BLUES with
.JOHNNY WINTER
MIDDY WATERS
JAMES C4TION

l~~~t~pt y

coft U vi CJ

E D
TH DAILY

Bargain
For
Hunters

jo s /4fI.,.*.
I - 1

e~ite
d.2QL ilL -

CLASSIFIEDS

.,. ,. w .010% AM

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan