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March 01, 1977 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-03-01

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i!uesday,Ivlarcm I, i'y 1l

PaF Te H MC-~A~L

DEMANDS LARGER POLICY INPUT:

Orde Faculty deba
Your (Continued from Page 1) Some members expressed con-
ery effort should be made to cern that the purpose of the re-4
S r lace tenured ittructional staff view process within a school or
members in another suitable college be clear from the begin-
position." But Cecil Nesbitt, fning. Health Education Profes-
To ay math professor, asked why there sor Scott Simonds said all par-
was "no guarantee' that tenured ties should .know whether the
professors would keep their jobs review intends to improve the
if programs are cut. He noted quality of the program or to
7640558
that a one-year warning before judge its value with termina-.
firing is "minimal notice for the tion in mind.
tenured faculty at the Univer- "I'm very troubled by this
sity of Michigan." He suggested document," protested English
at least a two-year warning. 1 Professor Eric Rabkin. Claim-

tes unit cuts

AFSCME returns to
original contract demands

ing support from a 1975 state-
ment of the American Associa-
tion of University Professors,
Rabkin asked that greater re-
sponsibility be given to faculty
in such matters. Program dis-
continuance recommendations
coming from a school's execu-
tive committee and dean should
be directed to the school's fac-
ulty before action is taken by
the Office of Academic Affairs,
he said.
MEDICAL SCHOOL Professor

T 1

Bennett Cohen was one of sev-
eral faculty members who ques-
tioned the urgency of the pro-
ceedings. Davis responded by
pointing to the scarcity of funds
- both state and federal - that
have already threatened two de-
partments. She also said the
new procedure is being "sharp-
ened" by "the current experi-
ence of DPP."
"Safeguards for students
aren't taken' care of," accord-
ing to Professor Donald Port-
man. He saidthat students have
been overlooked and that they
are a . high priority" concern.
ANOTHER KEY ISSUE cen-
tered around the separation of
money matters from quality as-
sessment. Gordon stressed the
distinction between these two as-
pects of the review procedure.
Some of yesterday's recom-
mendations will be incorporated
into the final document sched-
uled to go before the Regents
for approval on March 17. The
Faculty Assembly's steering
committee - the Senate Advi-
sory Committee on University
Affairs (SACUA) - will work
with the Office for Academic
Affairs in drawing up the final
draft.

4 Y 4
/ NS
h.<
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(Continued from Page 1) j
not satisfied with the settle-
ment brought back to them by
bargaining leader Art Ander-
son. Anderson himself offered
the chief position to Block, but
the union president refused it.
Today's talks will be Block's
first appearance at the negotia-
ting table.
Neff said he was aware that
the union's proposals today
would not resemble anything
'ciose to compromises previous-
ly reached by the two teams.
"I prefer to niake my com-
ments initially to the union,"
Neff said when asked for his
opinion of the AFSCME de-
mands.
Neither party would say what
they thought might be accomp-
lished at today's session. Thom-
as Badoud, the state-appointed
mediator who requested the ne-
gotiations, will probably chair
the talks.
AFSCME workers will contin-
ue their strike throughout the
renewed bargaining and until
a new contract is ratified, union
officials maintain.
BLOCK HELD a news confer-
ence yesterday where he an-

nounced AFSCME's intent to

prefer charges against Neff for dent will be brought up or where
driving a truck which struck a we would be dealing on any oth-
union member, Tim Seguin.. er than economic issues," Neff
The incident occurred Satur- said.
day at the University laundry fa- Neff said he could not com-
ci'ities. ment on the truck/striker mis-
Seguin, who was not seriously hap until he knew whether
injured, is a member of the charges were actually filed
AFSCME bargaining team, and against him.
sat across the table from Neff
during four months of negotia-! THE UNION said it would also
tions prior tonthe union walkout. press charges against Neff for
an alleged assault on two wo-
ASKED yesterday what he men picketers. Neff was said to
thought the atmosphere might have "charged" and pushed the
be when he and Neff faced each women.
other again in today's negotia- An AFSCME spokesperson
tions Seguin said, "It will be said last night that the union
tougher on him than it will be was waiting for city detectives
on me.". to complete their investigation
"I can look him straight in the of the incidents before filing
eyes, but I don't know if he'll charges.
be able to look at me straight," As negotiations begin, the
Seguin added. walkout continues into its sev-

"I don't see where the inci-

He said that the two teams
will "just have to play it by
ear" in order to find out if Sat-
urday's incident will have any
effect on the actual bargaining
process.
NEFF SAID IT was the Uni-
versity's intent to "bargain in
good faith" today.

a1
t
i
I

enth day with pickets still pres-
ent at most major buildings.

--

Johin t~tt'{ tti/C fStalfwri1j1 e'1 (' 1.
Choose from a wide variety of introductory
and advanced courses taught by Stanford's
own distinguished faculty and guest
professors. Courses in such fields as:
history / humanities / languages / sciences
mathematics / technology / social sciences
education / special programs and institutes

stanwod
summer
ses0sion.

-hille 20 -.J1lfrll/ 13

Surround yourself with our unusually pleasant climate,
nearby beaches and redwoods, and enjoy the cultural
and recreational attractions of a great university and the
San Francisco Bay Area.
* 1 he Summer Visitor Program is open to undergraduate and
graduate students in good standing, persons aged 25 years or
over and qualified high school students.
The application procedure is smple, and summer visitors need not
nie( o the usual admissions requirements.
[or your copy of our 1977 Summer Session Bullet in and an application
for admission, clip this-ad and mail to.
Stanford Summer Session
Stanford University'
Stanford, CA 94305
(415) 497-3109

THE UNION strategy remains
the same - to slow down the de-
lierv of s-noies to the campus.
In East Ouad, results of the
strike are becoming more evi-
dent as leftover food dominates
the meals, garbage clutters hall-
wavs. and bathrooms get
"st-ffed im."
Fa ved with a shortage of heln
in the kitchen, East Quad offi-
l- ltast week closed down one
of the dorm's two cafeterias.
1?Q --ln-s were crowded into the
ramniniina cafeteria. "forcing 'is
to eat in hot,. hot onnressive cir-
.,tces. according to one
5t-r det.
Stdents eventvaly contacted
the University fire marshal for
an annraisal of the situation,
and he ordered the second cafe-
teria be re-opened to accommo-
date diners.
The dorm now faces an added
dilernma. S'iidents must pass
throngh the inner-kitchen to get
to the re-opened cafeteria, since
malsare only being served in
n~ nortion.
Residents took it upon them-
selves again to tell the Univer-
sity health officials, who con-
demned the situation, students
said.
Last night's dinner, they said,
found diners marching through
the food prenaration area with-
oit proper attire or hairnets.
Sipoorters of AFSCME say
they will continue their efforts to
get both cafeterias opened.
One East Quad resilent re-
norted last night that a fourth
floor bathroom was "stuffed up
comoletely," with toilets over-
flowing onto the floors.
The situation in other dorms
on camous has been reported as
much better.

y

'9

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Friday, March 4, at 8:30, iu Hill Auditorium

NAME

I

One of the strongest music centers of Europe has long been Brno, the city of famed
Czech composer, Leos Janacek. Established first as the Czech Radio Orchestra, the
exisemble was reorganized, expanded and renamed 20 years ago. Today, with 113
members, it is one of the world's finest, now on its second tour of the United States.

ADDRESS

PHONE.

PROGRAM
PAUER: "INITIALS"
DVORAK: SYMPHONY NO. 8 in G MAJOR
MARTINU: 'SYMPHONY NO. 3

I

Mail or Bring in Person with payment to:
420 MAYNARD STREET
MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO: THE MICHIGAN DAILY
ONLY $8 until March 1, 1977

Tickets are available from $3.50 to $8.50
(All tickets purchased for the Czech Philharmonic on March 3 will be
honored at the March 4 concert.)

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