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February 25, 1977 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-25

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Friday, February 25, 1 977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

~iday, February 25, 1977 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

Merger
may save
DPP from,
extinction
(Continued from Page 1)
A SEARCH committee is try-
ing to redefine the twenty-year
old program's academic direc-
tion within the school. But ac-
cording to Remington, "It's not
a strong department.".
On' February 2, Remington
and his executive committeet
recommended cutting DPP on
the basis of the findings of the.
Population Planning Review
Committee, but both .Remidgton
and DPP advocates recognized
the possibility of strengtientng
both programs after SPH mem-
bers spoke to the Executive
Committee.
The recommendation to cut
DPP cited a predicted million
dollar deficit within SPH and
"major academic weaknesses.,,
REMINGTON said five cri-
teria were used to evaluate
DPP's academic quality-teach-,
ing quantity and quality, Ie-
search quantity and quality, rind
service.
"In the review of Population
Planning, only in the area of
service and teaching quality is
this department viewed by its
peers as strong. In the other
areas. there are major weak-
nesses," said Remington.
Remington agreed with mem-
bers of the department that
DPP is especially valu1le in
its public service efforts in both
the international and domestic
spheres. But he qualiied Hs
praise, claiming the department
probably overemphasized its
commitment to service Pt the
expense of the other criteria he
outlined.
BUT THE overriding concern
has been money. "If we elimin-
ate the Department of Popula-
tion Planning, we will save
$14,00," Selin said.
This money is needed, over
and above DPP's present budget
of $540,000, to address the pro-
gram's academic deficiencies,
according to Remington.
The DPP Review Committee,
appointed in the fall of 1975, re-
ported that a new chairperson
and two assistant professors
were necessary to upgrade de-
partment quality.
THE LEADERSHIP problemsi
in both DPP and MCH were also
discussed at yesterday's meet-
ing. DPP Associate Prof. George
Simmons called a DPP/MCH un-
ion a "viable alternative .
(that) properly handled, could
help us address the leadership
issue.
Ford son
goes to
Roling
stone
NEW YORK (Reter)- Jack
Ford, 24-year-old son of formeri

President Ford, was named yes-
terday as assistant to the pub-
lisher of Rolling Stone maga-
zine, a counter-culture bi-week-
ly.

Consumer Action Center gets
flak from Genesee Co. chief

By ANN GERTISER
Michigan citizens - usuallyG
low and middle income people
who lack the means to protect
themselves - lose three mil-
lion dollars each year through
fraudulent and unfair, business
practices. .
Furthermore, the Washtenaw
County Consumer Action Cen-
ter (CAC), formed to protect
consumer fraud victims, is not
fulfilling its potential accord-
ing to George Steeh, chief of
the nationally - acclaimed con-
sumers' unit in Genessee Coun-
ty.
"THERE ARE now fifteen or
twenty laws in the area of con-
sumer protection that have nev-
er even been brought to court
in Washtenaw County," said
Steeh, who unsuccessfully op-'
posed Washtenaw County Prose-
cutor William Delhey in last
I fall's general election.
A full-time CAC employe
agreed that "CAC should be
doing a better job prosecuting,"
and added that Delhey is not
really interested in consumer
protection.
'it's a non-traditional area
that Delhey doesn't emphasize,"
he said. "It gives us a slight
advantage th ugh - he never
tries to medde or dictate. We
have much greater freedom."
CONSUMER PROTEC-
TION programs are usually
formed under the auspices of
the prosecutor's office. Because
CAC employs only one part-time
prosecuting attorney, it fo-
cuses its resources on media-

! Lion and negotiation of com- fraud prosecution, they could
G plaints rather than prosecu- have a much greater effect."
tion. Students working four to six
Prosecution is not always the hours a week handle 55 per
best course for the consumer, cent of CAC's complaints, with
explained CAC director John three other full-time employes
Knapp. "The judge may give handling the rest.
r the offender two years and say
nothing about restitution to the "I COULD DO a lot more
complainant. "with the media if I were re-
Steeh, however, prefers to heved of the complaints," said
see a jail term. "Restitution is Knapp. "People could be in-
not enough of a disincentive to formed that there is a service
stop the person from rippg here. I could warn people of
people off another time," he as- frauds they should avoid."
serted. The Consumer Protection Act,
effective April 1, will sigiiifi-
STEEH ALSO FEELS CAC is cantly broaden the consumer
underfunded. "Delhey does not enforcement law. It will pro-
initiate action," he complained. vide for fines over $25,000 and
"If he's not interested, it is re- give greater subpeona power to
flected in the various divisions. bring evidence irnco court.
He is the one responsible for "The CPA ' is one law that
getting needed services funded. would render any prosecutor
"They (CAC) need a lawyer negligent if he doesn't provide
or else they will lack an en- -the service in his office to en-
forcement orientation. If they force that law as well as oth-
had a lawyer who could spot ers," Steeh said.
opportunities (for) consumer
I HAD
CANMAND
I1LUVED.
* Clasifre

Dalv Photo by ANDY FREEBERG
NarCiSsls
Legend around North University Ave. has it that if the
first commuter of spring sees his or her reflection in a puddle,
gets scared and runs back into the bus that'six more weeks
of winter will follow.jI his woman, however, seems more fas-
cinated than terrified.'
VE BANDS LIVE BANDS LIVE BANDS LIVEA
II--
-J DON'T MISS
4 MUGSYZ
W Friday and Saturday st
at ther"
-Jr
SURE THING
327 E. Michigan>
YPS ILANTIz
482-7130r
"1 SUNV 3A1 S®NYS 3A1 SCINVS 3AI T
- .

., ...

Chabad House presents
FRIDAY NIGHT
February 25-8:00 P.M.
"THE JEWISH WOMAN
as SECOND CLASS-
THE MYTH EXPOSED"
FOLLOWING FREE SABBATH MEAL
Rabbi Y. M. Kagan
author, educator, philosopher
GUEST SPEAKER
SATURDAY NIGHT
February 26-8:30 P.M.
TWO FILMS:
"'THE CHASSIDIN"
Chassidic Life in America
"SHALON OF SEFAT"
Life and Work of Self-Trained
Chassidic Artist
REFRESHMENTS--NO CHARGE

Gerry Pirce
You never seem to hear
about the people who
are cured of cancer. I
am one of them.
My cancer was dis-
covered early. Because
I went for a PAP test
regularly.
I want you to'have a
PAP test. Make an
appointment for one
right now. And keep
having the test regu-
larly for the rest of
your life.
The rest of your
life may be a lot longer
if you do.
I know. Ihad cancer
and I lived.
HaveaPAPtest.
It can save your life.

thee'
Classitfed

lu
r
1 l f i
'lot-
d6&ES1E¢ : :, tt

Amencan
Cancer Society.

4

at 715

HILL ST.

PGPU r urtAN

ii, V,

(near State)
Phone 99-LEARN

Iif$I SPACE CO NW1I8UOc'Y Ifif PUBuSO

.c ." ar a

-I

7'-

a

No salary was disclosed for
Ford, who will assist publisher I
Joe Armstrong with marketing, !
circulation 'and advertising as
well as development of a new
outdoors magazine called Out-'
side.
Armstrong said the magazine
became interested in Ford aft-
er doing a cover story on him
and his efforts for his father'
in last year's presidential elec-
tion.

..

1

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ABC CHARTERS
AIR ONLY FROM DETROIT

Amsterdam
Frankfurt
Honolulu
London
Munich
Zurich
WEEKEND
Montreal
N.Y. City
Toronto
Las Vegas
All Prices

f romr
f rotn
frunt
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$289
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and Dave Alan Prs
Mdnight Music Specials
TH E
- LENNY WHITE.
Fcrmer Drummer of Chick Coreo's
"Return to Forever" )
MARCH 4 MIDNIGHT
DOORS OPEN AT 11 :30 P.M.
Alk i~~Satst,:i'r'.i' , i.ii 'AI. tt',iiTliht.ii r ,
Sta e St ,I ' cordiw i. e t he riar i 'd ,
Ho use n'eod,,, I i. ~ir'.~ i
RA11SEYs'LEWVIS
MARCH2 6 MIDNIGHT ,
DOORS OPE T 1:0 PM
Ann Arbor s
00 4%i MICHIGAN THEATRE

I p..
SWORDFIGHTERS-GUNFIGHTERS SERIES
SAMURAI-PART I1
(AT 7:00)
Hiroshi Inagaki's trilogy on the life of Musahi Miyamoto ends with
Miyamotos showdown with his arch-rival, Kojiro Sasaki.
THE LEFT-HANDED GUN
(AT 9:30)
Arthur Penn and Paul Newman combined their talents in this highly
controversial and, at the time (1958) 'innovative, psychological presen-
tation of "Billy the Kid."
*As part of this series, film historian Joseph Anderson will speak on
Samurai and Western films between showings.
CINEMA GUILD BOTH FOR OLD ARCH.
~I~EU ~$2.00 AUDITORIUM
TRIBUTE TO LUCHINO VISCONTI 1970
(FRIDAY & SATURDAY)
THE DAMNED
The first of the films in our tribute to Visconti, this film explores the
li~acn - 4,+k arf n ri.nr.ti fmil i - - C-mnn A

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