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February 24, 1977 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-24

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Page Eigf f

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, February 24, 1977

Page ig1~tTHE MCHIGA.DAIL

Y - ., I - I -

Prelude to the
AFSCME strike:
A summary
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(Continued from Page 1)
But at the end of January,
the teams still had not discussed
the economics of a new con-
tract, and negotiators were be-
coming entangled in revising
employe promotion, transfer
procedures, and other non-eco-
nomic issues.
On February 7, University
and union bargainers sat down
for the first time with a state-
appointed mediator in hopes of
speeding up progress.
BY THIS TIME, the mood
around the bargaining table had
begun to change.
Anderson abandoned his op-
timism and warned that nego-
tsations were "going to have to
pick up considerably if we're
going to be done by the dead-
line."
"There is no way the union
will extend the negotiation dead-
line after February 15," Ander-
son added on February 7.
AFSCME'S original proposal
called for a $1.04 per hour wage
increase over three years, the
removal of a University "cap"
on cost of living payments, and
other economic benefits.
When the University first re-
sponded to AFSCME's wage pro-
posals on February 8, the union
termed the counter-proposals

"unacceptable" and began prep-
arations for a strike.
Negotiators finally resolved
the key non-economic issue -
promotions - which had block-
ed progress in their talks. But
with only three days left be-
fore the deadline, they were just
beginning serious discussion of
wages and benefits.
BOTH SIDES announced their
renewed optimism for a swift
settlement on remaining eco-
nomic issues, since non-econom-
ics were out of the way. Ander-
son said he did not see a strike
materializing.
It was the bargaining team's
optimism which prevented
AFSCME members from voting
for a walkout effective at mid-
night, February 15. Instead, at
the team's urging, union em-
ployes gave bargainers the pow-
er to negotiate as long as they
felt necessary. That decision
was made 'at a mass union
meeting on Sunday, February
13.
Three days later, with the aid
of the mediator, the University
'and AFSCME walked away from
the bargaining table with a ten-
tative agreement on a new con-
tract.
THE SETTLEMENT provided
a 55 cent per hour wage in-

crease over a two-year contract,
or roughly a five per cent raise.
The union had originally asked'
for a 15 per cent raise.
The proposed contract was
placed in jeopardy almost im-
mediately because of a split
ill AFSCME leadership over
whether members should ratify
it.
LAST TUESDAY, union men-
bers overwhelmingly rejected1
the tentative agreement and vot-
ed to strike.
At membership meetings be-
fore ratification was rejected,
union employes expressed their
outrage, not over non-economic
issues which took weeks to re-
solve, but on wages and bene-
fits which negotiators spent only
a few drays discussing.
In spite of the current walk-
out, either side can seek re-
newed discussiions at any time.

I

Hatcher, Gary mayor,
addresses conference

(Continued from Page 1) the have-nots of this countr3
Hatcher said of the new presi- who put him in office."
dency: "I am concerned that Hatcher's views on goals foi
the Carter administration does the present administration sug-
not become a joke, that we do gest rejection of the B-1 bomb-
not have four years of tremen- er program and an end to rac-
dous gestures. ism.
"Nonetof us expect Jimmy "RACISM IS still alive and
Carter to be Kris Kringle or well in America today," re-
Harry Houdini because James marked Hatcher. "The city of
Earl Carter is essentially a very Chicago preferred no mayor
smart politician from Georgia," rather than to allow the blaclk
the Democratic mayor contin- man who was chairman pro-tem
ued. "He must recognize a size- of the city council to fill the of-
able outstanding balance from fice of mayor for four days fol-

Y
r
,
i
f
r
Z k
f
.

lowing the death of Mayor Da- I1
ley."
In summation of his lec-ure, ,
Hatcher returned once more to -
the Carter administration, urg- '
" " " 1 ing it to be more responsive to1
the needs of blacks.
"I think that we must ask
a President Carter to listen well
Continued from Page1) -- Secretary of State Cyrus and to seize the opportunitiest
American people who Vance's recent Middle East tp that are his," the Mayor said. i
recitizen es old to was "very successful." Vance ALSO participating in the con-'
ovote."reported to Car'ter on the trip ference activities were Mayors'
during a morning meeting with George Goodman of Ypsilanti
national security advisers, and Albert Wheeler of Ann Ar:
* Carter said he plans to see bor, as well as University Poiti-t
Arab and Israeli leaders in cal Science Professor Pauline'
TONIGHT Washington starting March 12 Stone. The trio addressed a!
i .m. with Israeli Prime Minister Yitz- small audience yesterday in a;

marked. "Reward is unimport-
ant for the real reward comes in
seeing things change."
GOODMAN, a University pro-
fessor of public health, is also
the director of the University's
Opportunity Program-a branch
instrumental in supplying finan-
cial aid to minority students.
Voicing the same concerns as
those of Wheeler, Goodman said,
"The essential thing in politics
is for us to first register to vote,
then start to deal with the politi-
cal process as we expect the of-
ficers we elect to do."
Goodman also speculated on
the role blacks currently play in
the political process.
"When you represent a back-
ground that really has had no
effect on the system, the people
tend to become complacent see-
ing one or two black represen-
tatives," he said. "The public
is right now engrossed in their
own world." Goodman explained
this was due in part to the fact
that there is no mechanized sys-
tem that allows for constant
feedback from voters to admin-
istrators.
STONE, AN instructor of po-
litical science at the Center for

1. ./

11

NOON LUNCHEON
Homemade Soup and Sandwiches 50c
VIRGINIA HUNT
Women's Athletic Director-U of M:
"Women's Athletics at
the University of Michigan"
FRIDAY, FEB. 25
GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE (Corner of Oakland)

Ohak Rabin. The White House
later said the proposed visit is
611 CHURCHA2 996.955 planned for March 7 and 8.

(3)

Save and bundle
old newspapers
for recycling

1

I

panel discussion on politics in Afro - American and A f r i c a n
urban communities. Studies, was the third and final
Each mayor offered an in- panelist of the afternoon. Stone
depth account of how he, being voiced regret that black elected
a black, runs his city. Wheeler, officials are not representative
a University professor of micro- of the majority of blacks in the
biology, was also the first black cities. She acknowledged the
faculty member here. His re- fact that black politicians are
marks regarding blacks and pol-' usually middle class elites.
itics in the cities were geared "The issue we have to address
toward mobilizing black people is 'Who are these black elected
toward their goals and essential- officials governing for?' ", said
ly "learning to play the game."' Stone. "What will be a major
"We have to hurt when we impact on their governing pcli-
see injustice," Wheeler re-; cies - class or race?"
Party sentiments
ky to Carter wi
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(Continued from Page 1) ed Carter with almost any Dem-
sues like the Vietnam War ocratic candidate and blacks
were strongly emphasized, con- i would have voted for him."
servative Democrats supported Although voters did not asso-
Republican Nixon instead of ciate the candidates with stands
their own candidate, George on issues, 60 per cent judged
McGovern, j the candidates on liberal-conser-
P AR T Y identification was vative terms, Miller states.
graphically demonstrated in the Surprisingly, Carter's image
1976 election by black voters. changed from moderate (or
- Blacks, who traditionally vote conservative) to liberal during
Democratic, gave 94 per cent of the course of the campaign.
their votes to Carter. But notes Another important factor in
Miller, "you could have replac- the election was the voters' im-
pression of the competence of
INTRODUCING: the two candidates. Carter and
EDWARD5 Ford received nearly equal
ratings as individuals, but 44
PROFESSIONAL per cent of the voters felt Car-
HAIRSTYLIST ter was capable of running a re-
for men & women sponsive, efficient government
appts. 668-9329 while only 30 per cent felt Ford
was.
DasCOla Barbers THIS DIFFERENCE w a s
Liberty off State partly inspired by the themes
of the candidates' campaigns.
"The primary emphasis (in
the Republican campaign) was
Fresh crab 6hef s on Ford as the president and as
1 a family man - not as a deci-
t ,SmGIf- Th C pri3es sion maker," Miller says. Car-
ter, on the other hand, stressed
O n AC. le y Ov! 6 e beleadership in his campaign.
Q o O w -t rather The aftermath of Watergate
did not affect Ford's campaign
So C - C as was predicted, according to
Miller- Voters registered about
the same level of distrust in
government in 1976 as they had
at the height of the Watergate
scandal in 1973. But Ford's par-
don of Nixon did have an im-
pact on voters' decisions.
"ABUUO p per cent of the
- --__ voters disapproved of the par-
don, even after two years,"
C Miller says.
Economic issues, although
stressed heavily by the two can-
didates, were relatively insigni-
ficant in voters' minds.
47 $T"Economic conditions weren't
even as important as the Nixon
pardon," Miller says.

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