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February 24, 1977 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-24

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Artsn Entertainm ent Thursday, February 24, 1977 - Page Five

I ®
Ilwr s

'A

Star is Born'

dis

By DOBILAS MATULIONIS
OUT OF A GREAT deal of
confusion, scandal, pro.
duction hassles and massive ego
trips came Warner Bros. extra-
vaganza A Star is Born (at
Briarwood), but you'd never
know it from simply seeing the
film. Director and writer FrankI
Pierson (script of Dog Day Af-
ternoon) has effectively hidden
the shaky production and inter-
nal discord of the making of the
movie with a solid script,
straight - on direction, and a
lot of diplomacy (with the ac-
tors).
A Star is Born contains a lotj
of talented people, and fortu-
nately everyone lives up to his
reputation. Three time Acade-
my Award winner Robert Sur-
tees gives the film its high gloss
ultra professional look with his
rich and beautiful photography,!
and because of it Barbra Strei-
sand has never looked better.
The music by Paul Williams
(Lifeguard, Bugsy Malone) and
many others sounds perfect, es-
oecially Kristofferson's never'
finished hard rock song "Watch
Closely Now". Every facet of
the film reflects quite a bit of
money and effort, but the most
important plusses of the movie
are the performances of Kris

Kristofferson and Barbara Strei- tremely well acted by Kristof-
sand. |ferson.
Kristofferson 'plays a rock| As for Streisand, her singing
superstar who is slipping out in the film (a substantial part of
of the spotlight because he is A Star is Born) is excellent. Her
eternally boozed and spaced love affair with John Howard
out, especially at his own con- has that ethereal, short lived
certs. He even forgets the lyr- fairy tale quality about it that
ics to his hit song during a per- gives the whole movie a very'
formance, and tries to cover up enjoyable flavor.
by quickly moving into another Predictably, John cannot ac-
song amidst a hail of garbage cept the success of his wife
from the audience. Although Esther along with his decline.
Kristofferson's character is per- The reason, however, is not his
haps stereotyped in that it is male ego, but the loss of his
the portrayal of what everyone career, which gave a meaning
imagines a rock superstar to be, and a direction to his life. His
it is still very interesting and lultimate suicide (somewhat am-
entertaining. biguous in the film, though it

,plays,
Unfortunately, the last scene,
Barbra Streisand tour de fort
is very weak and pointless. P
haps it was Streisand's id
since she had the final c
rights to the film, not Piersor
Happily, the final scenec
tracts little from the basic o
standing entertainment valu

ta ent
, of the movie. Although A Star
ce, is Born is a high budget "Hol-
er- lywood" film, it contains a cer-
ea, tain ineffable energy that
cut sweeps the viewer along with
de-n it, and it is this quality that
ut- puts it a cut above most other
ies "mass audience" films.

Re C. players put
onThe Changeling'

i

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was written as a suicide) is the

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JOHN NORMAN HOWARD product of his public humilia-
(Kristoffersoh') is the typical tion and his feeling of failure
man who is jaded by success- (as in the other two early film
he is cynical, bored, dissatis- versions of the story). Not even'
fied., unpredictable and totally the love of his wife could save1
capricious. During one of his him.1
concerts he walks off the stage,
drives back on with a fan's THE FILM contains quite a'
motorcycle while knocking over few cinematically excellent1
equipment, roars off the stage scenes (especially the concerts).
into the crowd, and eventually The breathtaking helicopter shot
ends up in the hospital. When a nf the huge concert crowd cap-
publicity helicopter appears tures the electrifying excite-.
over John's house, he grabs a ment of a live performance,1
pistol and starts shooting at it. while the lighting of the per-1
The whole movie is filled with formers in the indoor scenes isI
effective bits of characterization as good or better than the light-
like these, all of which are ex- ing of many live rock bands.x

Doily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG
Art critic Nicolas Calas is one of the eldest living spokesmen for the Surrealist movement.
He was in town this month to discuss the movement and give anecdotes on its fascinat-
ing followers.
Nicoles Callas: fols the
Sur realicst call: Challenge

By SUSAN BARRY
T HE RESIDENTIAL College
Players are offering a
seventeenth century tragedy by
Thomas Middleton and William
Rowley as their major winter
production. This Jacobean dra-
ma, called The Changeling, is a
conventional period piece that
the Players stress will be pre-
sented faithfully in its original
Renaissance milieu.
Matthew Wikander, head of
the R. C. Drama Concentration
program, chose and will direct
the play. Wikander received his
doctorate in English at the Uni-
versity.
Lead parts will be played by
Cindy Bauml, Russell Som-
mers, Bob Brown, and Heather
Phillips, all veterans of earlier
R. C., Productions.
IN ADDITION, the R. C.
Players promise to include a
Renaissance Ensemble. Tony
B3urdick will be the musical di-
rector.
This offering promises to high-
light the efforts of assistant di-
rector and president of the R.C.

Players, Alisa Soloman, who
has been doing an independent
research study on Jacobean
drama. Hopefully the combined
efforts of the several experienc-
ed technical directors will cul-
minate in andadaptation that
accurately conveys the atmos-
phere of Renaissance tragedy.
The drama will be presented
tonight through Saturday night
at 8_ pm in the R. C. Auditorium.
THIS THURSDAY, FEB. 24
THE ARK Presents
DICK SIEGEL
Toaether with the Amazinq
MINISTERS OF MELODY
(Tom McGovern-Flute
Bruce Dondero-Acoustic Bass)
Some of the. finest
Original Music in the
"Free World"
~They play some damn stood
notes . '" LamRon Williams
Doors open at 8:30
Starts at 9:00
ADMISSION $1.50
761-1451

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By NICOLA BINNS
NICOLAS CALAS - author, art critic, and
poet - cast off from his native Greece
sometime during the troubled 1930s and headed
straight for Paris. There, in the vortex of Eu-
rope's constantly artistic flux, he joined the.
Surrealist movement.
In 1977, Calas has the distinction of being
among the eldest living spokesmen of Surreal-
ism. Since becoming an American citizen in
the 1940's, he has lived in New York, lecturing,
writing and thinking on the art form which has
absorbed his attention for over 40 years.
When Calas visited Ann Arbor earlier this
month to speak on "The Challenge of Surreal-
ism", it was to suggest art's relation to many
seemingly separate subjects. Yet, in the true
Surrealist manner, he managed to draw the
topics together under the rubric of Art: religion,
poetry, psychology and black magic all became
vehicles for fantastic inspiration.
SURREALISM, said Calas, "is something that
relates itself to art, but breaks away;" it is
"the bringing together of objects that no one
would think belong together."
Andre Breton, whom Calas grew to know
while in Paris, was the inspirer of the Surreal-
ist movement following the first World War.
One of his techniques was to include manne-
quins in his paintings rather than the antique
sculptures which were popular at the time. Fol-
lowers of 'the movement then developed further
the idea of adding seemingly out-of-place or un-
conventional objects - even words - to their
works.,
"Breton was against portrait painting because
you find your reflection in yourself," not in the
picture, explained Calas.

STUDENT PICS SOUGHT:
'U. Photo bO planned

;s
$,
i'
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WITH HUMOR gleaming in his eyes, he gave
an example of his old friend's eccentricity.
Breton, Calas related, was once asked to paint
his sponsor's portrait. Instead, he sent back,1
a telegram which read, "If I say this is your
portrait, then this is your portrait." His sponsor
sold the telegram later for an exorbitant price.
When the artist asked for his share of the
money, she replied by telegram, "If I say this
is your payment then this is your payment."
Calas' mind is a wealth- of such anecdotes
concerning the great twentieth century artists.
As an art critic and author of several books on
various movements, he has managed to remain
in touch with many of the artists he has met
over the years.
Of all the creative figures he came to know,
Calas calls Kandinski, Picasso and Duchamp
the most prominent forerunners of modern art:
Picasso "because of his critical renewal", hisj
constantly original imagination: "Kandinski forC
his radical transformation and his endeavor for
the fourth dimension, which was destructive of
painting:" and Duchamp "because of his caring
humor and his high degree of poetry."
AS FOR Surrealism's validity as a future
study, Calas feels the art students of today are
interested enought in it to make it play an im-
portant role in their education. He called the
"do your own thing" complex of today's genera-
tion a basically Surrealistic viewpoint and em-
pihasized the importance of "Museums without
walls", of learning about art through one's ownj
imacination rather than just through books.
Alienation, a problem to which today's stu-
d'nt is acutely sensitive, has a language, ac-
cordine to Calas. That language is art - and
es'-cinlly the fantasy-filled art known as Sur-
realism.

By NICOLA BINNS
.JAVE YOU EVER dreamed
of having your photo-
graphs published?
Well, here's your chance. A
group of photography students is
planning to publish a book of
photographs taken by Univer-
sity students - and you're in-
vited to submit your own.
"It will be a showcase for the
level of accomplishment that
the photograph people are do-
ing here," says Ken Wiatrak, a
member of the book's produc-
tion board.
"WHEN PEOPLE think of
art," he explained further, "it's
California or New York. No-
body ever looks at the Midwest.
"We're trying to get nation-
wide exposure fortthe students."
The finished product of the

black and white and as close Davis and Reider of the denart-
to 8" by 8" as possible. -Mount- ment, choosing the best 48 for
ing or matting them is optional. publication.
For those interested in pro-
THE DEADLINE for turning curing this piouant (non-profit)
in prints is next Monday. In- publication, it will become
terested students should contact available sometime this sum-
the photography department at mer.
763-3527. Prints turned in will----------
be examined by a council of
students advised by Professors-C ,3 , ;

i

Have a flair fo'
or writing are
stories a b out the
drama, dance fm
arts: ContatAts
Editor, /O The
AM Michi an Dail

40'

photo drive will be about 48 i
pages of duotone printing. Pho-
tographs submitted must be
ASTAIRE & ROGERS Double Feature 7
TOP HAT
(AT 7)
From the golden age of Hollywood musicals,,.
this film portrays the suave, carefree high life.
that, now as then, offers perfect escapism.
GAY DIVORCEE
(AT 9:05)
Ginger is trying to get a divorce while Fred
carries, on an uphill romance. Also starring
Edward Everett Horton.
BOTH FOR OLD ARCH.
$2.50 AUD.
RFSIDENTIAI CI I C P1 AVFS

SHOWTIMES 7:00 & 9:00
DI CK &JANE
DI 9106
Pty , , ,. ,.

ANN AIUEICI7U UEUAC;+-CL
Tonight in Auditorium A, Angell Hall
ZATOICHI (AT LARGE) -
(Issi Mori, 1972) 7:00 ONLY
zatoichi is a blin dsworsman who vanquishes every foe despite his
handicap, through a long series of extremely popular films. He is
popular because he is the underdog. This is the Ann Arbor Pre-
miere for the sightless wonder, one of the great characters of the
Japanese cinema. Stand aside, Zorrol Joseph Anderson] a specialist
on Japanese film, wil speak after the show about the relative
qualities of Japanese swordfighting heroes and America's western
gunslingers. Japanese with English subtitles.
JOHN FORD FESTIVAL
John Ford has been called a great director nonpareil by such
diverse directors as Bergman, Hawks, Godard, Bogdanovich, Truf-
faut. wim Wenders, Rivette, Welles, Eisenstein, Milius, Fuller,
Anderson. Scorsese, Kurosawa and Renoir. He created a body of
work unmatched in the history of cinema. Starting tonight with
THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE, we are presenting, in
conjunction with Cinema Guild, some of the key works in Ford's
career. "John Ford is not only merely a man for all seasons, but
an artist for all time."-Andrew Sarris. "I like mostly the old
masters, meaning John Ford, John Ford, and John Ford."-Orson
welles.
THE MAN WHO SHOT
LIBERTY VALANCE
(John Ford, 1962) 9:00 ONLY
Ford's most personal film, the poignant culmination of fifty years
of filmmaking. Ford uses a simple story (a senator returns to a .
western town for the funeral of a pauper and tells an inquiring
reporter the true story of who shot Liberty Valance) to\ explore
the conflict between reality and symbol, truth and legend, memory
and conscience, form and substance. Probably the masterwork of
one of America's greatest artists. "THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY
VALANCE achieves greatness as a unique work of art with the
emotional and intellectual resonance of a personal testament."
John Wayne, James Stewart, Lee Marvin, Vera Miles, Edmund
O'Brien.
Admission: $1.25 single feature, $2.00 double feature
"
Friday, Feb. 25 in MLB-
"TH E SMALLEST SHOW ON EARTH"
with PETER SELLERS
Kubrick's "LOLITA"
THE MARX BROTHERS in
"COCOANUTS"
"MONKEY BUSINESS"
"HORSEFEATHERS"

SHOWTIMES 7:00-8:25-9:50;

Roots' star looks for work

LOS ANGELES (AP) - Ac- his costar, Ernest Borgnine, in
cording to Hollywood lore, nifty a six-cart series called Future
things happen to an actor who Con that ABC will start in
lands a meaty role in a hit TV March.
show and gets great reviews. The show was a TV movie
All manner of Hollywood mendi- last season. Before Roots aired,
cants glide up, waving big mon- ABC asked Amos if he'd like
ey, offering big roles, speaking to do more episodes of Future
of superstardom and immortali-I Con.
ty. "THE MONEY was good, and
Nothing happened, really," you know this business is feast
grinned John Amos, 34, the tall, and famine," the actor said. "I
powerfully built man who drew knew I -wasn't going to get an-
mighty good reviews as the other Roots right away, so I
adult Kunta Kinte in ABC's top- said, 'Damn right',"
rated Roots a few weeks ago. ' Amos, born in Newark, rais-
"More recognition, maybe, but ed in East Orange, N.J., once i
that doesn't put money in the tried to be a pro football play-
bank. Everyone tells me it's er. He didn't make it. So, after
going to happen. So I'm just various jobs, he became a stand-'
waiting," he added. up comic, then a comedy writ-
THERE WAS NO bitterness er, then an actor. .
in his voice, just a matter-of- The proverbial big break came ,
fact tone suggesting he's been when he was cast as Cordy,
around long enough to realize the black weatherman of CBS'
that if you truly believe the Mary Tyler Moore Show. In ear- -
Hollywood dream it can ruin lv 1974, he got costar billing as
your whole day. head of the new Good Times:
On this particular day, he was ghetto household on CBS.
in a cop's uniform, having lunch THEY PARTED, WAYS last
before going back to work with season. Producer Norman Lear's
P.
r i

office says Amos was unhappy,
asked to be let out of the se-
ries. Amos says he was dropped
from the show. He also says he
prefers to discuss positive
things.
Such are Feets a new comedy
album on which he is working;
a possible movie about a Zulu
chieftan on which he began re-
search and writing five years
before Roots, and, of course,
Roots itself.
A friendly, straightforwardI
man, Amos didn't hesitate a
moment when asked what he
felt that series did for Ameri-
can viewers:
"I think the best thing it did
was to raise everybody's level
of awareness as to what the
institution of slavery was about,
what slavery did to cause such
tremendous schisrns in the coun-
try for so many years.
Midwest's Largest Selection of
European Charters
Canadian and U.S.
from $289
CALL 769-1776
-,Great Ploces ,
TRAVEL CONSULTANTS
216 S. 4th Ave, Ann Arbor

New

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t
(
I

rA Iv a.J"I I tifL LVL C L-fl F LN-)

present
MIDDLETON 6 ROWLEY'S
THE CHANGELING
As it was Acted (with great Applause) in 1623

SHOWTIMES 7:00 & ':05
10 ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINATIONS
NETWORK
R

JOIN THE DAILY STAFF

,_. .- ,

FEBRUARY
24, 25,26
8 o'clock PM
EAST QUAD
AUDITORIUM

lip

Admission $1.25

PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM irn the POWER CENTER
***FEBRUARY 25-27 * Fridayathrough Sunday
at 8:00 p.m
THE AWARD-WINNING BROADWAY COMPANY Saturday and Sunday
at 2:0r p.m.
The ( ad l 'Award- Winning

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