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February 20, 1977 - Image 7

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Michigan Daily, 1977-02-20
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Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY MAGAZINE

February 20, 1977 February 20, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY MAGAZINE

*0@@o.

events and entertainment
week of Feb. 20-26

This week's IHi'/f>wuiins fin reviews
were written by Christopher Potter and
Mark Hill. The bars and events listings
were compiled by Jin Sinmson.
sunday
CINEMA
Experimental Films-(Ann Arbor Film
Co-op, MLB 4, 7 & 9:30)-A collection of
nine short films.
Story of a Love Affair - (Cinema II,
Ang. Aud. A, 7 & 9)-Michelangelo An-
tonioni's first feature film, concerning
the suspicious involved in an unhappy
marriage.
This Sporting Life - (Cinema Guild,
Arch. And., 7 only)-A brilliant English
critic as well as filmmaker, Landsay
Anderson directed this film before he
subsequently ascend :jto the surrealistic
pathos of If ... and (0Lucky Man. ***1/2
The Loneliness of the Long Distance
Runner-(Cinema Guild, Arch. Aud., 9:05
only)-Tony Richardson's film from the
Alan Sillitoe novelette about an incor-
rigible, individualistic teenager in an
English reform school.
BARS
Blue Frogue - Fito (salsa rock) $2
cover, $1 for students.
Second Chance-Masquerade (rock 'n'
roll) $L50 cover, $1 for students-
EVENTS
Musical Society-The Guarneri Quar-
tet, Rackham And., 2:30 p.m. (sold out).
Trombone Students Recital - Recital
Hall, 2 p.m.
Percussion Students Recital - Recital
Hall, 4 p.m.
Degree Recital-William Allgood, DMA
bassoon: Recital Hall, 6 p.m.
Degree Recital-Stephen Smith, DMA
piano: Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
Horn Students Recital - Cady Music
Room, Stearns Building, 8 p.m.
mond r
CINEMA
Nothing scheduled.
BARS
Blue Frogge - Fito (salsa rock) $2
cover, $1 for students.
Second Chance - Mojo Boogie Band
(rock) $1.50 cover. $1 for students.
Win Schuler's-Jason (soft contempo-
rary) no cover.
EVENTS
Musical Society-Alvin Ailey Dancers,
Power Center, 8 p.m.
Tuba Students Recital-Recital Hall, 8
p.m.
University of Michigan Wind Ensemble
-H. Robert Reynolds, conductor, Hill
Aud., 8 p.m.
tuesday
CINEMA
Red River-(Cinema Guild, Arch. And.,
7 & 9:05)-Howard Hawks' great film
follows the lives of a cattleman and his
adopted son as their relationship evolves
from love into bitter emnity during the
course of a huge cattle drive West. John
Wayne, Montgomery Clift. ****
The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoise
-(Ann Arbor Film Co-op, Ang. Aud. A,
7 only) - Luis Bunuel's film is an
immense dream-within-a-dream-within-a-
dream absurdity that lacks the bite of
some of Bunuel's earlier savages on the
privileged, but at the same time, is con-
siderably funnier. ****
The Phantom of Liberty-(Ann Arbor
Film Co-op, Ang. Aud. A, 9 only)-Bu-
nuel's s u r r e a 1 extension of Discreet

Charm, only fare more labarynthian and
far less funny.**
Titicut Follies-(Sociocinema, MLB 1,
4 & 7:30; FREE admission)-A terrify-
ing look at the inner workings of a seedy
state mental hospital by a master of
documentaries, Frederick Wiseman."**
BARS
Blue Frogge - Fito (salsa rock) $2
cover, $1 for students.
Second Chance - Sonic's Rendezvous
Band & The Rockets (rock) $2 cover,
$1.50 for students.
Win Schuler's-Jason (soft contempo-
rary) no cover.
EVENTS
Musical Society-Alvin Ailey Dancers:
Power Center, 8 p.m.
University Philharmonia-Concertos-
Clark E. Suttle, conductor; featuring
winners of the graduate and undergradu-
ate performance competitions: Hill Aud.,
8 p.m.
Degree Recital-Phil Thompson, clari-
net: Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
CINEMA
The Prisoner of Shark Island-(Cinema
Guild, Arch. Aud., 7 only)-Early '30's
John Ford film about the luckless doctor
imprisoned for giving medical aid un-
knowingly to John Wilkes Booth.
Young Mr. Lincoln-(Cinema Guild,
9:05 only)-John Ford's paen to Abe Lin-
coln as a lawyer in Illinois. '
Jimi Plays Berkeley-(Ann Arbor Film
Co-op, Ang. Aud. A, 7 & 10:30)-Hendrix
at the Berkeley Memorial Day Concert,
presumably of 1970.
Sympathy for the Devil (One Plus One)
-(Ann Arbor Film Co-op, Ang. Ad. A,
8:45 only)-Godard uses a Rolling Stones
rehearsal as a kind of Greek chorus to
his usual socio-political broadsides.
BARS
Blind Pig - Benson-Drelles Quintet
(jazz) $1 cover.
Blue Frogge - Fito (salsa rock) $2
cover, $1 for students.
Second Chance - Mighty Joe Young
(Chicago blues) $1.50 cover, $1 for stu-
dents.
Win Schuler's-Mustard Retreat (folk)
no cover.
EVENTS
Musical Society-Alvin Ailey Dancers,
Power Center, 8 p.m.
University of Michigan Jazz Band -
Louis Smith, conductor, Rackham Aud.,
8 p.m.
Degree Recital-Thomas McGee, cello,
Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
thurs day
CINEMA
Zatoichi-(Ann Arbor Film Co-op, Ang.
Aud. A, 7 only)-One of an ongoing Japa-
nese series about-no kidding-a blind
swordsman. Apparently he always wins.
The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance-
(Ann Arbor Film Co-op, Ang. And. A, 9
only)-No, not the end-all Western, not
John Ford's -end-all Western, not even
really much of a Western. Ford's story
of the post-dated unravelling of a famous
sagebrush shootout is old hat plotwise
and often downright shoddy in execution
(practically the entire film was shot on
a studio set). **%
Top Hat-(Cinema Guild, Arch. And.,
7 only)-Astaire and Rogers musicals,
like Busby Berkely musicals, are an
acquired taste but difficult to shake once
hooked. This particular episode is con-
sidered by many to be the top of the
form. ***
Gay Divorcee - (Cinema Guild, Arch.
Aud., 9:05 only)-Whimsioal whispy plot

which serves only to deliver the dancing
scenes, as in any Astaire-Rogers film.*
A Doll's House-(Peoples' Bicenten-
nial Committee, Nat. Sci. Aud., 8 only)-
Can a liberated woman be a lover?
Henrik Ibsen raised more than a few
eyebrows when he posed this question
in 19th century Europe, in his play. This
Joseph Losey-directed film remains quite
faithful to the play and Jane Fonda does
a creditable job as Nora.
BARS
Second Chance - Mighty Joe Young
(Chicago blues) $1.50 cover, $1 for stu-
dents.
Win Schuler's - Mustard's Retreat
(folk) no cover.
EVENTS
University of Michigan Concert Band-
Allan McMurray, conductor, Hill Aud.,
8 p.m.
Degree Recital-Robert Grim, trumpet,
Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
Noah's Flood (a play?)-First Presby-
terian Church.
friday
CINEMA
Samurai, Part III - (Cinema Guild,
Arch. Aud., 7 only)-The third install-
ment of director Hiroshi Inagaki's tri-
logy of a Japanese warrior. With Toshiro
Mifune.
The Left-Handed Gun-(Cinema Guild,
Arch. Aud., 9:05 only)-A cerebral study
of Billy the Kid. Arthur Penn's first fea-
ture film illustrates his notion of a civ-
ilization t e e t e r i n g on the edge of
chaos.
The Smallest Show on Earth - (Ann
Arbor Film Co-op, MLB 4, 7 only)-A
very early Peter Sellers film about a
decrepit traveling circus.
Coconuts - (Ann Arbor Film Co-op,
MLB 3, 7 only)-The Marx Brothers' film
debut, and still hilariously intact almost
half a century later. */2
Monkey Business - (Ann Arbor Film
Co-op, MLB 3, 8:45 only)-The Marxes
run wild, first at sea, then on land.
Slightly stagebound, b u t continuously
hysterical. **
Horsefeathers-(Ann Arbor Film Co-
op, MLB 3, 10:30)-The Marx Brothers
utterly destroy the American university.
Probably not their best film, but almost
surely their funniest. **
The Damned-(Cinema 11, Ang. Aud.
A, 7 & 9:30)-Visconti's windy epic about
the moraland spiritual perversions of a
wealthy German industrial family at the
time of the rize. of the Nazi regime.
Lolita--(Ann Arbor Film Co-op, MLB 4,
8:45 only)-This was Stanley Kubrick's
first big success on his own terms. Vladi-
mir Nabokov did his own adaptation of
the screenplay, but unfortunately en-
countered opposition from the censors
for the sex s c e n e s. Nonetheless, the
movie benefits from his literary genius
and the perfect character casting, in-
cluding James Mason, Sue Lyon and
Peter Sellers. ***
Catch-22-(Mediatrics, Nat. Sci. Aud.,
7 & 9:45)-How does one film an unfilm-
able novel? Mike Nichols' 1970 film from
Heller's absurdist work is a valiant but
generally unsatisfying effort, due is much
to the director's casting concept as to
his literary conception. **%
Westworld) - (Couzens Film Co-op,
Couzens Cafeteria, 8 & 10)-Richard Ben-
jamin and James Brolin vacation at the
ultimate Disneyland extention, which is
serviced exclusively by dozens and
dozens of human-like robots. Westworld
contains the usual sci-fi loose ends, but
is, at least, a lot more satisfying than
its recent lamebrained sequel, Future-
,world. **
BARS
Blind Pig-Bill Heid Group, $1 cover.

Casa Nova - John Brown & Georg
Mallory (guitar-bass duo).
Second Chance-Dr. Bop & the Head
liners ('50's rock) $3.50 cover, $3.00 for
students.
Golden Falcon-George Overstreet &
Friends (jazz) $1 cover.
Pretzel Bell-RFD Boys (bluegrass)
$1.50 cover.
Win Schuler's - Mustard's Retreat
(folk) no cover.
EVENTS
PTP-"Raisin": Power Center, 8 p.m.
Musical Society-Jean-Pierre Rampal
flutist: Rackham Aud., 8 p.m.
University Symphony Orchestra-Con
certos-Gustav Meier, conductor; featur
ing winners of the gradaute and under-
graduate competitions: Hill Aud., 8 p.m
Degree Recital-Kathleen Segar, mezzc
soprano: Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
Noah's Flood (a play)-First Presby.
terian Church.
Saturday
CINEMA
Twentieth Century -- (Ann Arbor Film
Co-op, MLB 4, 7 & 10:30) - Howard
Hawks' classic '3$'s comedy about the-
ater people, with John Barrymore,
Carole Lombard and many other biggies
of the era.
Monkey Business - (Ann Arbor Film
Co-op, MLB 4, 8:45)-Nof to be confused
with The Marx Brothers' romp of the
same title, this 1953 Howard Hawks
comedy concerns a mysterious liquid
which makes adults revert to child-
hood. .
The Conversation Piece - (Cinema II,
Ang. Aud. A, 7 & 9)-A cultural clash
between a mild-mannered art historian
(Burt Lancaster) and a wild family
which moves in on him. Luchino Vis-
conti's last film.
Women in Love--(Ann Arbor Film Co-
op, MLB 3, 7 & 9:30) - A film which
seems to get better and better as the
vears pass. Ken Russell's work may not
stick too clhse to the D. H. Lawrence
original, but in some ways transcends
it, taking on a legitimacy all its own as
an erotic, literate work of film art. ****
The Goldfather, Part II) - (Cinema
Guild, Arch. And., 7 & 10)-Coppola com-
pletes his Mafia disection with a film
which probably surpasses Part I, but
like its predecessor, is dragged down by
the normally brilliant Al Pacino, whose
stiff performance as Michael, subverts
this work's shot at greatness. ***
Andy Warhol's Dracula-(Peoples' Bi-
centennial Commission, Nat. Sci. Ad.,
7 & 9)-The second of three runthroughs
for the 1974 Warhol-Morrisey film, first
called Blood for Dracula, and lately
Young Dracula. The name changes don't
improve the film. BOMB
Westworld - (Couzens Film Co-op,
Couzens Cafeteria, 8 & 10)-See Friday
Cinema.
BARS
Blind Pig--Bill Heid Group, $1 cover.
Casa Nova - John Brown & George
Mallory (guitar-bass duo).
Second Chance-Dr. Bop & the Head-
liners( '50's rock) $3.50 cover, $3 for
students.
Golden Falcon - George Overstreet &
Friends (jazz) $1 cover.
Pretzel Bell-RFD Boys (bluegrass)
$1.50.
Win Schuler's - Mu'stard's Retreat
(folk) no cover.
EVENTS
PTP-"Raisin": Power Center, 2 p.m.,
8- p.m.
Degree Recital - R o n a 1 d Frkcler,
piano: Recital Hall, 2 p.m.
Degree Recital-Jutta Putzig, soprano:
Recital Hall, 4 p.m.
Degree Recital - M i c h e 1 e Cooker
piano: Recital Hall, 8 p.m.

The Arb mi
A prisoner c
for reasons
By JAY LEVIN
Photos by ANDY FREIJEJ
( 'RAMPED BY FOUR squat, grime-smudged wall
chatting with a visitor thro"uh a pane of glas
fingerprints. He has to sqnint to see throgh his own
for a 20-year-old sbmereed in a period of wrenching i
murder and he dn sn't know why.
Wilson, hiwever. remembe's the e-tits of Pbmt rim
An autumn evening, he and a female comanion, h
slrilled through a tranquil Arboretlum. Suldenl, five
fur Wilson, a stroll broke into a sprint. I was runnm'
and the next thing I knew Icame to the end of the str
running for . . . and then I had to run even harder
Jeannine Boukai's nagging death wish.
"I don't know why in my own mind I did it,"
granted the Daily last month, some four months after
has rerouted his life. "There's no excuse for it .
the pressure, yet my mind said no," he went on,
"Finally, one part of me took over and committed thi
capable of ever committing."
Two stagnant months in the Washtenaw Conty Ja
did little to catalyze Wilson's mind-probing process. I
Ann Street cell for the Southern Michigan State pris
begin a 20 to 40-year term. More empty hours, more me
'HE WIDE PUBLICITY of his bizarre case had w
among his fellow inmates. But Wilson, sitting in
reflects only despair. He draws on images of the sor
ten-man cell block-"chipped and cracked, brick wall,
coats . . ." More verse leaks from his pen, about
months, Lea, whose weekly visits span the whole c
through that soiled pane of glass.
Though about to embark on at least a decade 1
directs his thoughts towards the future, weaving drea
and their
4 [;e *+r e.\*' someday b
".with the c
years ago
The new
his own di
the Yamal
a Univers
im in ec
were callin
at those m
jON EY?
Wilson.
better mod
too. Dope?
where. At
answers.
Wilson f
? s June, wle
Jose told
town wher
f' living goo
years in B
town just
moved to c
a short sti
Polk, La.
"I was
pressed st
son recalk
at the tim
to occupy
job, all mi
here."
Wilson d
..~>seen pretty
They're c
addicts or
.3 other."
He mad
he says h
streets. Bt
with recoll
here, one b
ship with
Jay Lev

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