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February 16, 1977 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-16

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, February 16, 1977

Palll~nl1111111111111111111 e 111 Eigh THE 1 1 11 MICHIGAN 11 111 1DAIY1Wednesday, February1 16, 1977' 111111111111 1011111 '' + -.- . -..

- --- C

;Study
in Italy
this Summer
BARBIERI CENTER/ROME CAMPUS
JUNE 16-JULY 23
Art- History- Literature
Barbieri Center/Rome Campus
TRINITY COLLEGE
Hartford, Conn. 06106
READ and USE
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

U' studies on gyms questioned

VANCE ARRIVES IN ISRAEL:
Mideast talks

I

(Continued from Page 1)
tion Building and the North
Campus facility," and that, "the
present recreational facilities
are not used to full capacity."
But the Committee to Save
Barbour/Waterman (CSB/W)
and Ralph DiGaetano, an em-
ploye of the University's Statis-
tical Research Laboratory, say
they have done some figuring
on their own and conclude that
there recreational space has on-
ly increased 37 per cent in the
past year.

SOURCES IN THE Recreation
Dept. support the committee's
claim, and add that since there
has been more than a 40 per
cent increase in users in the
past year, there has in fact
been a decrease in recreational
space.
Michael Stevenson, head of
recreational sports, said about
DiGaetano's study, "He's dope
his homework; every figure he's
got is from the Plant Dept. I
think he's got a good case."
Stevenson added, "But I

agree with President Fleming's re-use of the gyms. They claim
statement that there is an in- their findings, when reported to
satiable demand for recreation- the Regents, will help show that
al facilities. There is no ques- the University is incapable, or
tion in my mind' that if we had unwilling, to conduct such a stu-
another 20 racquetball courts or dy on its own.
another swimming pool, we THE NATIONAL TRUST For,
could fill them to capacity at Historic Preservation has also
peak times. But if I went to sent a letter to the Regents re-
the Regents and asked them for questing "a full, feasibility stu-
a new facility, they would laugh dy of the re-use potential of
me right out of the room." the gymnasiums." The National
IN A LETTER to the Regents, Trust is the only national, non-
CSB/W charges that the Uni- profit, private organization char-
versity made at least two large tered by Congress to encourage
errors in its recreational space public participation in the pres-
calculations. The committee ervation of historical sites.
claims that the University omit- The Michigan State Historical
ted the Coliseum from its 1975 Preservation Dept. has also the
figures, even though the Hill St. University be more thorough be-
facility opened for basketball in 'fore tearing the building down.
1974. And they say the Univer- Other groups opposing the
sity included Barbour/Water- demolition of Barbour/Water-
man in its calculations for Fall, man include the University
1976, when, in fact, the gyms Women's Commission, the Ann
were closed. Arbor Historic District Division,
The Committee's letter con- Citizen Association for Area
tinues, "These errors show Planning, the Michigan Student
either an ignorance of the rec- Assembly and prominent wom-
reational issue or - with all en on the faculty and staff of
respect - dishonesty.. ." the University who say that the
Opposition groups hope the gym complex has served as a
Regents will hire an outside firm center for women's activities
to conduct a study of possible ( since the turn of the century.

f
t
t
t
t
F
i
>
.

(Continued from Page 1)
One of the questions Vance
will pursue with Arab leaders
later in the week is whether the
PLO national council at its
meeting next month is liable to
revise the provision in its "cove-
nant" calling for Israel's de-
struction. Such a move, accord-
ing to U.S. officials, could open
new possibilities for a settle-
ment.
VANCE, WHO HAS a low-key,
easy-going-manner, did not in-
dulge in the banter that char-
acterized former Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger's rela-
tions with reporters.
The secretary has said that he
wants to find what visions each
of the leaders he will visit have
for a future Middle East peace
settlement - and to determine
how flexible each is on resolv-
ing questions of procedure. He
has made clear that Palestinian
representation is the chief is-
sue.
IF% YO'fU CANDRIVE
ACAR,
O U COULD' SAVE
YOUR FRIEND'S
LIFE.
For free information write to:
DRUNK DRIVER Box 2:5
Rockville. Maryland 20852

Carter halts'bomb-
sale to sraelis
WASHINGTON (AP) - The avoid embarrassing Vance
Carter administration will can- while in the Jewish state.
cel the sale of a highly con- The CBU-72 is dropped by
troversial bomb to Israel, U.S. parachute from a jet plane. Up-
sources said yesterday. on detonation a highly vplatile
An announcement of the deci- fuel mixes with air causing a
sion will be delayed at least powerful concussive effect.
until after Secretary of State An earlier version, the CBU-
Cyrus Vance leaves Israel to- 55, was used in Vietnam. The
day and perhaps until his re- oly difference was that the ear-
turn from the Middle East next lier bomb was dropped from
week, the sources said. helicooters and other slow-mov-
THE CANCELLATION of the ing aircraft.
CBU-72 sale is in line with The CBU is particularly use-
strong recommendations by f'tl against solid targets and in
Vance and other State Depart- clearing heavily vegetated
ment officials. areas. It also has a highly de-
st'cte eff"ect on people be-
Israeli sources say no official s cseft ruhngpforce and
word has been given them aboutscrushing force and
the aborted sale and they still folTowing fire.
THE ORIGINAL commitment
hope for approval to Israel was arranged by for-
But administration officials mer President Gerald Ford and
say there is little if any chance his secretary of state, Henry
for a reversal. They added that Kissinger, in the closing days of
the only reason the decision has last fall's presidential cam-
been held up publicly was to paigi.

On Thursday, Vance flies to
Cairo for talks with Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat. He has
no plans to meet any Palestin-
ian leaders.
In Damascus, Syria, a PLO
spokesman told a news confer-
ence that unless the United
States changes its attitude to-
ward the Arab case and "Pal-

begmn'
estinian rights," American in-
teres'ts in the Mideast would be
"undermined."
"We caution the world that
the United States continues to
ignore our existence and rights.
We caution Vance that we won't
buy any of his bad goods," said
the spokesman, Abdul Mohsen
Abu Maizer.

_

I

U

I

NEW

ENERGY-SAVING HOURS
at SAM'S
We will be closed 5:30 to 9:30 on Fri-
day nights. Our new hours will be 9 to
5:30, Monday through Saturday.
SAM'S STOR E

Racquetball's a smash hit

207 E. Liberty

663-8611

fr

0 'Nhl.

Robin Zander is the lead singer. He's impeccable and he has a nice
smile. Tom Petersson plays the bass guitar. Wide-eyed and other-
worldly, Tom creates auras wherever he goes. Rick Nielsen is tbe
wild man of Cheap Trick. Rick abandoned his plans to become a
cartoon character in order to join the group. Bunezuela Carlos,
who was named after a country in South America, is the drummer.
Together, they are Cheap Trick. And together, they spent
countless days and nights on the road, slamming rock
and roll in bars, bowling alleys and warehouses, '
preparing for this, their first album. n
Cheap Trick. Only rock and roll
could bring them together. "Cheap
Trick." Their first album. On Epic\
Records and Tapes.
Produced by Jack Douglas for Waterfront Productions Ltd.
SEft MARCAREG ,19/,CBS MO 0 1

'49,

1%1 ,

PT
est
Featurng
February 16-20 GeorgeAxler
Wed.-Sun. at 8:00 p.m. Guest Actor-
Sun. at 2:00 p.m. Power Center in-Residence
Tickets available at PTP Ticket Office
Mendelssohn Theatre Lobby, Mon.-Fri 10-1, 2-5
For Information Call. 764-0450
Tickets also available at all Hudsons

(Continued from Page 1) match.
works out "at the old IM Bldg. A short, lightweight racket
"So we came over and she show- resemblitig a tennis racq'let is
ed me how. I'd never played used in racquetball; paddleball
before. enthusiasts' use a contraption
"It nurtured our relationship," which looks like a large, wood-
he added. L en ping-pong paddle with holes.
The courts on which Lyon Dick Pitcher, University di-
played lay claim to racquetball rector of intramural sports, says
fame by giving birth to its old- racquetball has become popular.
er, sister sport - paddleball. "It's possible to have early
The late Earl Riskey, a fre- success in the game," he ex-
quenter of the old I.M. Bldg., plained. "With a couple of tips,
developed this brand of indoor it's not difficult to play a de-
fun. cent game after~ an hour." i
RISKEY TOOK his cue from JUNIOR KATHY MacKAY,
tennis players hibernating in who is enrolled in one of the
handball courts for the winter, paddleball/racquetball classes
and began playing an early ver- offered by the physical educa-'
sion of paddleball with a ten- tion department, agrees with
Tni nbbleewsPitcher.
The tennis ball, however, was "I'm just starting," she said,
too heavy to stimulate the kind "but I feel I can learn without1
of lively, bouncy game paddle/ feeling like a total incompe-
racqueteers have comne to ex- tent."#
pect today. So Riskey soaked Despite the ease of instruc-
the tennis balls in gasoline, tion, few will deny that racquet-
which eroded the fuzz and left ball offers the kind of constant
a light and vouncy core, sweaty action many people look!
Paddleball hasn't really for in athletic diversion. 'o
caught on outside the Midwest. "YOU DO EXERCISE hard,"
The game is somewhat more said Kevin Lyon.
difficult to play than racquet- adKevijn Lyo R :
ball, and the slower moving ball Added junior Carol Rowe: "I
makes for a more plodding like it because you really get'
ks r mr d to smack if (the ball). It helps
you get your aggressions out
and it's more fun than jogging."
Senior Alan Cassels points out'

that both paddleball and rac-
qlzetball are ideal for "people
who don't want contact sports,
like basketball. They can still
get exercise."
BOTH GAMES, contends sen-
ior Betsy Bacon, "are twos of
the few games women can play
against guys without too much
of a disadvantage."
The reasons for the racquet-
ball boom, however, apparently
go deeper than its ease for be-
ginners.
# "The manufacturers got into
it," noted Pitcher, "There's new
equipment that is good to play
with "And holds up pretty well."
PLAYERS ARE OFTEN per-
turbed by the wait for courts.
Nevertheless, most students
shrug off the long lines and wait
patiently for their cherished,
one-hour time slots in the cav-
erno'us, cubicle-like courts.
"If I belonged to a private
club," said Lyons, "I'd have
to pay an incredible amount of
money.
"The facilities here are really
good," he continued.. "If I want
to put in a time commitment,
then I can get a court. All it
takes is a little bit of planning."
However, Rowe warns, "If
you don't plan ahead it's a drag.
I think a lot more people are
playing now."

J

I

,. a z.
" ''

---r -

MARTY'S... GOES DUTCH TREAT WITH THEIR SECOND ANNUAL ...

0

AP
lam
u Ift

UGTI

NOW
THRU SATURDAY
SPORT COATS

-SUIT

S --

I

REGULAR WEDNESDAY'S
PRICE DUTCH TREAT

$125
$145
165
1135
$225
$275

$107
$127
$140
$150
$205
$250

THURSDAY'S
DUTCH TREAT
190
$110
$120
$130
1180
1225

FRIDAY'S
DUTCH TREAT
172
192
100
$110
$155
1200

SATURDAY'S
DUTCH TREAT
$55
$75
*80
$90
130
$175

REGULAR - WEDNESDAY'S THURSDAY'S FRIDAY'S
PRICE DUTCH. TREAT DUTCH TREAT DUTCH TREAT

$40
$50
$60
$85,
$100
$125

A 30
140
150
170
190
105

125
$35
$40
$60
$80
s90

$15
$25
$30
$50
$65
$75

SATURDAY'S
DUTCH TREAT
10
*15
$20
$30
$45
$55

m
weva telling
oil the,
ulnk ed.siates

I

amp-

r

I

CASUAL SLACKS ' 2
DRESS SLACKS

[r

OFF

LEISURE SUITS

Wednesday's Thursday's Friday's Saturday's
REG. DUTCH DUTCH DUTCH DUTCH
PRiCE TREAT TREAT TREAT TREAT
$45 $38 $31 $24 $17
X50 $42 $34 $26 $18
$75 $64 $53 - $42 $31
$85 $73 $61 $49 $37
$100$85 $70 $55 -40

LEATHER COATS
LEATHER JACKETS OFF
TOPCOATS '
SUBURBAN4COATS

SWEATERS
Arnold Palmer Cardigans
Fancy Wraps
Patterned Crews & V-necks

AFr

1 77 - - I

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I -A

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1 I#%r1 VS r I~#%r 1I lC I t~ UUA~r2 rrr

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