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February 12, 1977 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1977-02-12

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Saturdcy February 12, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Saturday, February 12, 1977 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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DAILY
International
Syrian forces
withdrawn
TEL AVIV - Israeli state ra-
dio reported yesteiday that
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin
announced an agreement w i t h
Syria for withdrawal of Syrian
forces from a Lebanese town
eight miles from the Israeli ber-
der, but Rabin's office denied
any such del.
The radio said Rabin had an-
nounced the Syrian pullout, but
Rabin's spokesman said lie had
zonferred with the prime min-
ister and there was "no talk of
a concrete agreement."
Rabin spoke at a political
meeting in the Galilee area. Ac-
-ording to his spokesman, t h e
prime minister expressed his
"conviction that political and
:iplomatic efforts in re c e n t
lays would bring about a pull-
out" of Syrian forces.
But spokesman Dan Pat'ir
stressed, "He didn't announce
an agreement>"
The radio said the Syrians
would move back to their prev-
ious positions at the beginning of
next week, coinciding with the
arrival of Secretary of S t a t e
Cyrus Vance on Tuesday.
Foreign Ministry sources in
Jerusalem said Thursday t h a t
Israel's ambassador in Washing-
ton, Simcha Dinitz, who h a d
been expected to return home
in advance of the U.S. Secretary
of State's visit, had been told
to stay in the United States
till the Nabatiyeh question was'
settled.
Spanish officials
rescued

DIGEST*

FEBRUARY 12, 1977

At about the time police were
rescuing the two kidnap victims
in Madrid, gunmen believed to
be leftists shot and killed a
plain-clothes police inspector in
Barcelona and wounded another
policeman.
It raised to 53 the number of
persons slain in political v i o-
lence in Spain since the death of
Gen. Francisco Franco 14 mon-
ths ago.
Because police seemingly
could not crack the case of their
hisappearance, there was wide-
spread speculation that the kid-
nappers really were rightists
aided by police opposed to the
nolitical liberalization program
f the king and Premier Adolfo
Suarez.
But GRAPO repeatedly denied{
such rumors in its ransom notest
and insisted it was a revolution-
ary leftist organization that tookc
its name from the date it killedf
four policemen in Madrid. f
N "1ionait

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F
t

a misdemeanor charge in the ketable phosphorus for use as
shooting death of her lover, fertilizers.
skier Spider Sabich. The panel split 4-1 on t h e
Kiritsis faces charges f kid- decision, with commission mem-
raping, inflicting injury in com- ber E. M. Laitala opposing the
mission of a felony, armed rob- ban. Laitala said phosphate de-
bery, obtaining a signature by tergents have "improved t h e
:hreat, commission of a felony quality of life" and described
while armed, committing a the action as a return to the
:rime of violence while armed days of "Fels-Naptha" and oth-
and disorderly conduct. T h e er bar-style detergents.
armed robbery charge s t a -Is In response, Commission
from Kiritsis' commandeering Chairman Joan Wolfe held up
of a police car when he took'two boxes of the same brand
Hall hostage Tuesday morning. of laundry detergent, one of
them phosphate-free - and
Farmers haul said.
"There's no warning that one
water does a bad job and the other
does a good job."
PEORIA, Ill. - Farm vehicles Commissioner Hilary Snell ab-
carrying big; barrel-shaled steel stained from voting on grounds
water containers are now com- that his law firm represents a
mon in Illinois. Up to 95 per company in the industry, while
cent of the state's farmers are 'Commissioner Charles G.
hauling water for livestock, of- Younglove declined to vote with-
Ficials say, and wells are going out offering an explanation.
dry in small towns that never Earlier, representatives of the
had water shortages. Soap and Detergent Association
Ground moisture throughout accused the DNR of ignoring,
the state is extremely low and the consumer impact of the
less than normal spring rainfall phosnhate ban and said it
:ould spell trouble for farmers would cost the average family,
in Illinois, the nation's top corn $5 a year.
and soybean producing s t a t e That sum, according to the in-
last year. dustry, is far less than thel
"I don't think anyone has any cost of improving wastewater
idea how serious this draught treatment facilities to remove
problem is becoming," Rep. phosphates.
Thomas Railsback, (R-Ill.), said Tanner responded that, whilel
Thursday. the cost of phosphate-precipitat-'
Ira Markwood, head of the En- ing equipment is relatively low.,
vironmental Protection Agency's costs of other chemicals neededi
division of public water supplies, in the treatment process and dis-1
said the driest area extends posal of sludge are very high.E
from East St. Louis north to The industry also contended
heoria and est of Decatur to that the commission had no au-
the Iowa state line. thority to approve the ban and
In western Illinois, the last said it must be left up to the
six months of 1976 were the legislature, which currenrly isI
driest in more than 20 bears,cosdrn tw bil bang
and January 1977 was well be- consider n two bills banning
alw normal the N tii p

had a permit and were told
there was no permit, but that
the governor's office had been
informed of .the protest. The
officer took no action.
Sgt. Richard Perry of the Cap- =<> .: s<
itol detail later said he had
no basis for action unless the
state Department of Man 'ge-
ment and Budget officials com-
plained. Appropriate ufficials in
that office could not be reached
for' comment.
The planting of the tree was...
intended as a symbolic geszure. .
Tanker explodes
DETROIT - A Shell Oil Co.v<
tandem tanker truck tipped over
and exploded on a downtown
area freeway yesterday. spilling
16,000 gallons , of gasoline and
dis'upting traffic for hours in
the second such accident this
week.:>
The truck driver and anothcr
person suffered minor injuries
in the mishap, which o.,urred
during the noon hour on Inter-
state 75 near the exit for the
Ambassador Bridge to Windsor,
Ont.
A two-mile portion of the free-
way from the exit north to the
heart of downtown was closed, a; .
with authorities hoping to clean { 4
up the mess before the evening h
rush hour. Traffic also was
backed up on the Jeffries Free- ,.f
way interchange.
The tanker ha dswerved try-
ing to avoid a car pulling back
onto the freeway from a should- TDX-toit fire fighters hose down
er after he had dropped off a caught fire and spilled 16,000
hitchhiker, police said.-
It spun around, flipped over on Francis Scott Key, a lawyer
its side and exploded. Smoke who authored the "Star-
from the blaze could be seen Spangled Banner" ,in 1814,
from office buildings in the served as U.S. attorney for the
downtown core area, ponce re District of Columbia, 1833-41.

Hostage released
INDIANAPOLIS - Ant h o n y
Kiritsis, who considered himself
a free man after releasing the
hostage he held during a 63-
hotir vendetta, was arraigned
yesterday on a list of charges,
including kidnaping.
The stocky, 44-year-old Kirit-
sis was ordered held under
X850,000 bond, despite the grant
f immunity read to him during
the seige. Some authorities said
yesterday they never intended
to let him go free.
"I would have promised you
title to Hawaii if I could have
.otten that guy out of there."
;aid Marion Co'nty Sheriff Law-
renre Broderick.
"We had to placate him," In-
liananolis Mavor William Hud-
'ut said. "Everybody thought he
had the dynamite. I was scared
to death that one or both of
them were going to lose their
lives."
During the three-day standoff,
Kiritsis said he had rigged dy-
niamite in the apartment where
he was holding Richard Hall,
but none was found after his
s"rrender.
Pr- - iors so'waht a $1.5 mil-
lio- ' ^^ for Kiritsis. but that
tvnq re-ted by Municinal Court
Judgp Frank Harlor after Kirit-
sis' Attorney, Owen Mullin, com-
nlained that "even Claudine
Lonzet didn't have that kind of
bond and that was a death
:ase." Longet was convicted on

I
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r.
a
G
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t
i
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AP Photo
m a tandem tanker on I-75 yesterday. The tanker exploded
gallons of gasoline on the highway.

-110, 11111

FRI.-SAT. $3.00
PHILO RECORD'S
OWEN
McBRIDE

t A
ffe

MADRID - Police yesterday
rescued two top Spanish offic-
als unharmed and arrested four
members of the left-wing group
presumed responsible for kid-
napping the officials.
The government said police
found and freed Lt. Gen. Emilio
Villaecusa, Spain's chief mili-
tary judge, and a few minutes
lated tracked down royal advis-
er Antonio Maria de Oriol on
the outskirts of Madrid.
A radical leftist organization
:alling itself the First of Oc-
-tober Anti-Fascist Resistance
Group - GRAPO - earlier
:laimed responsibility - a n d
was blamed by police - for both
kidnappings.
-- - - - - -

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, w1U11117oeia onaiv ea-
her Service said.
The northwestern corner of
the state in January received
)nlv 0.6-inch of moisture, 1.2
inchesbelow normal, and many
sarmers are making 40-mile
round-trips to towns still willing
to sell them water.
State
Phosphates
banned
LANSING - The state Natural'
Resources Commission, deciding'
environmental benefits out-
weight the consumer consequen-
ces, has approved a ban on
phosphates in household laundry
detergents.
The action still is subject to
review by a legislative commit-
tee and approval by the attorney
general's office, and may be
challenged in court by the deter-
gent industry.
The commission adopted a re-
solution yesterday saying Lake
Erie, portions of the other Great
Lakes and 40 per cent of Mich-
igan's inland lakes are showing
the effects of phosphorus pol-
lutios and that a household ban
"will have positive benefits."
Natural Resources Director
Howard Tanner, who strongly re-
commended the ban, described
the action as a "significant
step" in the state's overall anti-
pollution effort and said it would
free dwindling supplies of mar-

Seafarer protest
LANSING - Wielding pickax-
es and shovels and singing old
protest 3songs. a small groin of
demonstrators tore up some sod,
near the Capitol steps yesterday
and planted a tiny evergreen
tree to a protest the N ay ' s
Seafarer submarine antenna.
The noon demonstration was
soonsored by the Great Lakes
Life Community which opposes
the project on moral grounds,
but others attended as well in-
cluding persons from the Upper
Peninsula area that has been
proposed as the site for Seafar-
er.
An officer from the Stare Po-
lice Capitol security detail ask-
ed the demonstrators if they

r

LEONARD BERNSTEIN'S
MASS
ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY by the
Howard Hangar Performers
Tuesday, Feb. 15-7:30 p.m.
AJNN ARBOR'S
FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
STATE & HURON STS.
Ticket donations for non-students are $3, $2 donation for
students; ($2 non-students and $1.50 students for groups
of 15 or more ordered in advan~ce) from the Wesiey
Foundation, in person or by mail. 602 E. Huron St., Ann
Arbor,'Michigan 48108.
Tickets and more information 9-12 & 12:30-3 week-
days. 668-6881.

He's back again with his
usual mixture of rowdy
Irish songs, soft ballads,
outrageous jokes, rebel
y e I Is and scurrilous
stories.

I

THURS., FEB. 10:
PETER "MADCAT"

I

RUTH and his
$1.50
8:30

magic harp
761-1451

,1421 HILL

jw

U

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
/pw ,'U 'y ! !' .Wy,{{.}s., {" - " es . : -. yC S
V"K::JT.le i {{}"tl:. y:.{": a ":::.}:"r":.""S .{"Yf}.S ilc..u"" ...at: sr~ } i,:"._,1.}:'}:":"::{ .................... :.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
Saturday, February 12, 1977
DAY CALENDAR
WUOM: First National Forum on
Business Gov't. and Public Interest,
Ralph Nader, Center for Study of
Responsive Law, "The Public Inter-
est's Position on Regulatory Policy,"
1:10 p.m.
Music School: Faculty Recital, Mary
Jane Eckerle, pianist, SM Recital
Hall, 8 p.m.
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 SAB - 764-7456
RECRUITING ON-CAMPUS
Feb. 14 - Carnation and Detroit
Plaza Hotel
Feb. 15 - IBM, and Chevrolet/
Information Systems Department
Feb. 16 - Henry Ford Hospital
Feb. 17 - Ohrbach's, Institute of
Paralegal Training and
Prudential Life Insurance
Feb. 18 - Harris Trust and
Savings Bank, and
Inland Steel Company
Phone: 764-7460 for information on
the following:
Psychodrama Internships and Res-
idencies offered at Saint Elizabeth's
Hospital, Washington, D.C. This
hospital is a federal psychiatric in-
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVII, No. 111
Saturday, February 12, 1977
is edited and managed by students'
at the' University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan.48109.
Published d a i l y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at. 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

stitution within the Department of
,Health, Education and Welfare.
Continental Grain Company is
sponsoring graduate fellowships at
selected schools in the U.S.
TRANSITION 77 at Oakland Uni-
versity, Rochester. Transition is the
3rd annual communications career
conference for students and profes-
sionals. The conference provides in-
formation on career direction and
discusses the realities, challenges
and opportunities of working in
media Saturday, February 26 at 8
a.m.
Canadian Library Association schol-
arships at anaaccredited library
school in Canada or the United
States. Must be a Canadian citizen
or have landed immigrant status.
The Hughes Aircraft Company is
offering fellowships in the fields of
Electrical, Aerospace and Mechani-
cal Engineering, Computer Science
Physics and Mathematics for gradu-
ates with a 3.0-.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB - 763-4117
Camp Chi, Wisc. Soc. Wk Oriented
Camp: Will Interview Weds., Feb.
16 from 9 to 5. General counselors
and specialists in tennis, sailing,
music, camp craft. Register in per-
son or by phone.
Camp Tamarack, MI. Coed: Will;
interview Thurs., Feb 17 and Mon.,
Feb. 21. All staff positions open at
this time.
Genesee County Flint Area, MI.:
Opening for Aquatic Supervisor Ex-
cellent salary. Details available.
National Capitol Planning Commis-
sion, Wash., D.C.: A GS-5, 7 sum-
mer job (Community Planner) stu-
dent assistant opening. Details
available.
Greenfield Village/Ford Museum,
Dearborn: Announces their summer
program for Guides and Food Ser-
vice openings. Details available.
Come in at your convenience. March
23 deadline for Guide openings. Food
Services interviews start Feb. 14
Irish Hills. G.S. Council will in-
terview Mon., Feb. 21 from 9 to 5.
Openings include Program Dir., Unit
Leaders and Aides, program special-
ists openings on waterfront (WSI)
tripping, kitchen, etc. Register in
person or by phone
Lakeside Farm (Coed), Watervliet-
(Girls) Camps: Will interview Weds.,
Feb. 23 from 10 to 5. Openings in
the camps tnclude CIT Dir. (23+),
Waterfront (WSI), Ski-Sailing Instr.,
Music, Nature, backpack, canoeing,
campcraft, theater Instr., kitchen
aids. Register in person or by phone.

..
Find What You're
Looking For in
The Classifieds

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TONIGHT At
SECOND CHANCE
RAISlN BAND
For further info:
994-5350

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Look Into Co-ops!I
Fall, or Spring & Summer
WE ARE...

* member-owned
0 member-controlled
* open & democratic
COME TO THE
'CO-OP OPEN MEETING'
SUNDAY, FEB. 13-1:00 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM
Learn about student-owned housing on
campus. 13 houses on Central Campus;
9 houses on North Campus.
& A)e
' M Applications Available at
Inter- Cooperative Council

By the time
we're old enough to
have children, we've
been thoroughly sold
on the idea.
By our paients,
our grandparents,
our friends and
neighbors,,the media,
everyone.
It's hard to
remember we ever
had a choice in the
first place.
But there is a
choice. Having a
child is a tremendous
responsibility and
an important decision.
Probably the most
important decision
we'll ever make.
And once it's
made, it can never
be undone.
Just remember ..
you do have a choice.
So think about it,
and do what's right
for you.
For more information wrter
National
Organization
for
non-Parents
806 Reisterstown Road
Baltimore, Maryland 21208
I'd like to know more about N.O TI.
Please send me your free
"Am I Parent- Material" package.
name

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