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February 11, 1977 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, February 1 1, 1971

THE MICHIGAN' Ally

Page Seven

THEM/CIGA~AIY Pge nve

Cornell likes Rhodes

(Continued from Page 1)
release termed him "a dynamn;"
and vigorous individual with an
impressive record on minority
affairs and affirmative action."
Contacted yesterday, Rhodes
said he had some "interesting
discussions" during his visit, but
added,- "There is still no com-
mitment on either side."
Alunmni representatives also
threw their backing to Rhodes,
but the Faculty Advisory Com-

mittee is withholding judgment.
Sources at Cornell indicate facul-
ty members were miffed be-
cause they weren't presented
with several candidates to con-
sider.
FACULTY group chairman
George Hildebrand, however,I
said he "liked . (Rhodes) very
much" and added, "I certainly
would be satisfied about Rhodes
becoming Cornell's ninth presi-
dent."

Populatioy
departmeir
(CQntinued from Page 1)
funds for about ten years and
now that money will have to1
start coming from the school's
General Fund, the school re-
fuses to support PPD as it does
other departments.
Further, the students claim,
the dean has deliberately stall-
ed on the appointment of a new
department chairman since Cor-
sa resigned last November. His
resignationi is effective in June.
Remington explained that
the new chairman would "cost
us money we don't have." He
said he also doubted the depart-
ment could get "a top flight
man to come" after the poor1
marks he feels the Executive
Committee gave it.

Hearing Sciences
program to end?

planning
p1
it in peril ards & Gifts
ing has not been of uniformly
high qulity" in the department
He explained the dissension ci r .
ted referrd to "style of lead-
e r conro ersy that cen-
Remington said the results of G
the committee were bahed on #
student evaluations and the ad-t+
vice of outside consultants fromG
North Carolina University and
though the two population stud-r
ies professors were only ins
Michigan for two days each, he f
places faith in their critical re- r
view.
In the department's defense, ...forte l ve
Corsa claims the use of total in yl
student credit hours as criteria
in judging the quality of teach-
ing is a misinterpretation of da-
ta. He said a more accurate
picture can be seen in the ra-
tio of credit hours to faculty
teaching funds. In this area,,
PPD ranks fourth of the nine'
departments in Public Health. :.
SIMMONS SAID the dissen-I'o
sion was in the form of argu- ore 4
ments which were constructive,2
not disruptive. "Arguing is a 2015 S Unive ry
form of communication," hey
added. "There are departments - 76 1-7177
in LSA where people don't even
speak to each other.
- - - --- - -1- -

(Continued from Page 1)
his action, but will admit that
budget problems in the Medical
School were a major factor.
Some Speech and Hearing#
students feel the Medical School
has never been behind the pro-
gram and this fact has led to
its questionable status.

facilities offer therapy to peo-
ple in the community with
speech and hearing difficulties.

Doily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG
Back on the job
The warm weather brought back this familiar Diag at-
traction yesterday. After being arrested and then released
a few hours later by the Ann Arbor Police for trespass-
ing on University property, Doctor Diag (Richard Robin-
son) mounted his podium and lectured qn , the Greek al-
phabet.

"How much will my degree
be worth?" asks Shirley Walk-
er, a sophomore in the pro-
gram. "The program will de-
teriorate, no matter how they
phase it out. How well am I
going to be educated?" Walker
thinks she would probably trans-
fer to another school if the final
decision went against the pro-
gram.
Incoming students are faced
with a more immediate dilem-
ma - they don't know whether
or not to enroll at all. Although
the master's degree program is
accepting one last class, appli-
cants are naturally wary about
making a commitment to what
may be a dying program.
A negative decision would al-
so close down the Speech Clinic
and Audiology programs. Both

j

ANNE MILLER, a doctoral
Petitions student, said the dean has pre-
1 maturely placed a moratorium
(Continued from Page 3) on admissions for new students.
to recall Gov. William Milliken "Word has gone out to the com-
charging hehas "failed to pro-miunity, too,' she complained.
tect the has "fa toch ro- "It's de facto annihilation."
tet h people of Michigan" Wa ol o oi o
from the toxic chemical. "What would you do if you
Hilda Green, president of the applied to a rograin good
PBB Action Committee, said faith and it fell through?" ask-
plans for the recall drive are ed Remington in responseto
ready, with final approval ex- a question about the moratori-
pected at a meeting of the um. Currently, the department
committee's board of director s notreviewing applications for
this- weekend.PPD;
"Thegovernor has failed to Probably the greatest point of
pratedtthe people of Michigan controversy however, is over
by doing what a governor the section of the review recom-
should," said Green, whose hus- mendation which charges that
band, Alvin, lost his dairy herd academic and research pro-
to PBB contamination, grams are substandard in the
"He hasn't gotten the con-- department - due, in part, to
taminated cattle off the market "internal dissension."
and he hasn't seen to it that the SOLOMON AXELROD, Chair-
farmers got reimbursed for man of the PPD Review Com-
their sick herds," she said. mittee, refused to "go beyond"
"We get a snowstorm and the 'ie statement that "the teach-
governor declares it a disaster
area. That's all well and good.$
But PBB has been around for !
three years and he hasn't de- i I
lared a disaster for the farm-

COMPLY WITH HOUSING RULES:
E. Quad residents
reject co-ed joins
(Continued from Page 1) ' Because of observations in a
KIRK WAS quite.-pleased at recent Daily article noting the
this information. existence of co-ed bathrooms,
"I'm glad that the problem Univer-ty housing officials have
has been resolved and I appre- put pressure on staff memoers
ciate the prompt attention that, of the two dorms concerned to
the residents and staff gave this correct the situation. So far,
matter," he said. East Quad residents have been
the only students to take any
e action.
BoukaONE RESIDENT wished to
hoint out the positive action of
his fellow dorm mates. "I'm
glad that at least 'we tried to
cope and resolve this situation,"
he commented. "We did the best
we could within University pol-
As the students tried to re-
20 -40
s~olv'e the matter, some coin-
Ilained that it seemed "foolish
to have to walk halfway down
' e~ hall jest to use the urinal"
R 1t one stuzdent. rationalized;
y ars"We can't disobey housing
(Continued from Page 1) licyv if we're going to he threat-
to consider his recent marriage 1erred with lease termination."
and unborn child. But some students seemed re-
"I'ni fully aware I must lieved to be finished with co-ed
serve . . . but God will have it bathrooms, anyway. As one fe-
be a short time,"he said.Then, male resident put it:I
he added, "I want my wife to "I don't like it. If I'm in there
know I love her." brushing my teeth and some guy
Wilson also issued a public steps out, I get really p.
apology to Boukai's parents for
"the terrible crime I commit-

ers.

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FEELING ISOLATED?*
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To register for an interview, or for more informa-
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LIMITED REGISTRATION

From Ralph Bakshi,
master of animation, comes an
epic fantasy in wondrous color.
A vision of the world, 10 million years
in the future, where Wizards rule the
earth. And the powers of magic prevail
over the forces of technology in the
final battle for world supremacy.

ted.
HOWEVER, C O N L I N
told Wilson that "Miss Bou-
kai's parents don't accept your
version (of the murder). They
believe you did it to leave the'
state."
Last month, when he pleaded
guilty to second degree mur-
der, Wilson testified that Bou-
kai had pei-sistently asked him
to kill her, and had offered him
the Yamaha motorcycle and $SO
in exchange for the deed.
Wilson . testified that he fre-
quentlv had attempted to dis-
suade Boukai, a 17-year old Na-
tural Resources student, from
wanting to die. B"t Wilson said
he had been saddled with his
own nroblems at the time, and
testified that he hqd finally
yielded to Bonkai's "shoot me!
shoot me!" wish during one of
their walks through the Ar-
boretiim.
BOUKAT'S PARENTS were
unavailable for comment last
night.
Asked whether he felt the
sentence was a fair one, Assist-
ant Defender Carlson stated
simply, "it's a sentence . . . I
always feel bad on sentencing
day."
Carlson said that Wilson
will probably be remanded to'
Jackson State Prison early
next week. He added that Wil- !
son would be eligible for parole
after serving about 12 years of
the sentence.

University of Michigan

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