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February 11, 1977 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-11

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" THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Ent rtnnFriday, February 11, 1977 Page Five
-r sOAKLEY SHINES IN TITLE ROLE:

IAiMI I I u

'Merry
By DAVID MASELLO
MOST PERFORMANCES of
operatic farces tend to be
contrived and amateurish. Not
so in Wednesday's Comic Opera
Guild version of The Merry
Widow at Lydia Mendelssohn.
While the show was not with-
out its faults, the players man-
aged to preserve a joyful ex-I
uberance throughout - and thej
result was memorable.-
The plot of The Merry Widow

Widov
is a complicated one, involving
conflicting love. It deals with
a country named Marsovia,
which is going through troubled
economic times. To reverse this
problem, Baron Mirko Zeta,
played by Thomas Petiet, tries
to win the fortune of Hanna
Glawari, (Bernadine Oakley)
the rich young widow of a court
banker. The Baron's objective is
to marry her to the Marsovian
count-anilo, thus securing her
fortune and the future of Mar-

':Great comic opera

Daily Photo by ANDY FREEBERG
Lorenzo Brown, the Lyman Woodard Organization's multi-percussionist whiz, plays drums
Wednesday night at the Blue Frogge.
L.W.O. plays Blue Frogge

Cinemna Weekend
Friday - The Big Sleep (Arch. Aud., 7 & 9:05); La Sal-
amandre (Ang. Aud. A, 7 & 9); A Fpnny Thing Happened
on the Way to the Forum (MLB 4, 7 only); How I Won the
War (MLB 4, 9 only); Seventh Annual Ann Arbor 8 mm
Film Festival (Schorling Aud., 7 & 9).
Saturday1- Putney Swope (MLB 3, 7, 8:45 & 10); Sher-
lock Holmes' Smarter Brother (Nat. Sci. Aud., 7, 8:45,
10:30); Jack Johnson (MLB 4, 8:45 only); Mingus (MLB 4,
7 & 10:30); The Missouri Breaks (Arch. Aud., 7 & 9:15);
McCabe & Mrs. Miller (Ang. Aud. A., 7 & 9); Seventh An-
nual Ann Arbor 8 mmFilm Festival (Schorling Aud., 7 & 9).
Sunday - Seventh Annual Ann Arbor 8 mm Film Fes-
tival (Schorling Aud., 7 & 9); Medea (MLB 4, 7 only); The
Gospel According to St. Matthew (MLB 4, 9 only); La Chi-
enne (The Bitch) (Arch. Aud., 7 & 9:05); film animations
(Ang. Aud. A, 7 & 9).
All weekend - Twilight's Last Gleaming, The Seven
Per Cent Solution, The Pink Panther Strikes Again, A Star
is Born: The Movies, Briarwood (769-8783); Echoes of a
Summer: Michigan (668-8480); The Enforcer: State (662-
5296); Bugsy Malone: Campus (668-6098); Rocky: Fifth For-
urn (761-9700); The Silver Streak: Fox Village (769-1300).

sovia. The story takes off in all
sorts of zany, wild directions,
each act becoming more and
more complicated until the final
happy resolution.
Generally speaking, the sing-
ing here was splendid, the li-
bretto (by Viktor Leon and Leo
Stein) realistic, and the scenery
striking. Most of the songs were
in the form of love duets. Valen-
cienne Zeta, played by Linda
Mohler, and Vicomte Camille
(Samuel Roelofs) were a fre-
quent contrast to Mohlers' so-
prano, both maintaining timing,
clarity and character through-
out.
HANNA GLAWARI, however,
had the loveliest voice of all.
As the widow, Oakley launched
into her first aria with a vigor
that brought life to the scene
immediately. Oakley's acting
was equally excellent. She was
relaxed and confident through-
AND

out the operetta, and her lines
were delivered with ease and
clarity. Her frequent duets with
the Count furnished the central
musical themes of the operetta
and each was a model of per-
fection. The music was written
by Franz Lehar.
Dancing was an integral part
of the show. In the second act,
,it was Russian-style, enhanced
by the bright, silky costumes.
At times the dancers were rush-
ed and off-step, but usually man-
aged to get themselves under
control later on.
The chorus line scene w'hich
involved several men in a dis-
play of synchronized waist-high
kicking was especially entertain-
ing. During this scene, the audi-
ence became quite involved,
clapping in unison with the beat.
The Can-can in the third act
was equally festive and enjoy-
able. The costumes were for
the most part startling yeIt au-

thentic in the dance numbers.
The main embarrassment of
the evening was caused by the
orchestra, which tended to play
above the singers' voices and
to come up with overly long
measures of sour notes ,which
radically departed from the jn-
tended mood. However, the en-
joyability of the rest of the per-
formance nearly made up for
these difficulties.
Mora a flair for
artistic writing,
if you are Interest-
ed in reeiewing
poetry, and Music
or writing feature
stories a botut the
drama, dance, film
arts: Contact Arts
Editor, c/oaT T
Michigan Dally.

By PETER HILL

"Mr. Rhythm" Brown and key-

keyboard. Other band member s

HE LATEST entry into the board great Lyman Woodard. turned in electrifying perform-
Ann Arbor nmusic scene is L.W.O.'s style of music is a ances as well. Davidson, or in-
at the Blue Frogge, where some smooth mixture of _ sounds, stance 'seemed at times to con-
of Detroit's leading contempor- which can appeal to a wide va- jure up a West Indian or Af-
ary musicians are giving ive" riety of listening audiences. For rican beat on the skins, bringing
shows during February and this reason, it is very diffizult an almost tropical mood
March. ;to label its style. L.W.O. has throughout the bar.
This week's and next wok's synchronized jazz, rhythm and THE GROUP will be play ng
offering is the Lyman Woodard blues, and soul music ;nto an again at the Blue Frogge Fcb-
Organization, a talent quartet e
consisting of Ron English on 1ui- Ienticing and mellow blend. ruary 13-16. If you appreciate
tars, George Davidson on drums, In Tuesday's sets, Woodard's professional and versatile mu-
multi-percussionist Lorenzo hands seem to float over the sic, you shouldn't miss LWO.
Finch, Dunaway among
Academy award nominees

I

I *"

I

LOS ANGELES (MY - P z t e r I nominated for posthumous
Finch, who died Jan. 14 of a awards as best actor.
heart attack, was nominated Faye Dunaway of Network
yesterday for an Oscar as best and Talia Shire of Rocky were
actor for his performance as among the nominees for ' e s t
the messianic TV anchor aan actress of 1976. The o-hers:

in Network.
NETWORK captured 10 nom-
inations in the 49th awards of
the Motion Picture Academy of
Arts and Science, tying witn the
sleeper of 1976, Rocky.
FINCH'S co-star, William Hol-
den, was also a nominee for
best actor, as well as Robert
Do Niro for Taxi Driver; Gian-
carlo Giannini, Seven Beauties
and Sylvester Stallone, Rocky.
In the past, only James Dean
and Spencer Tracy had be-n

Marie-Christine Barrault, Cou-
sin Cousine; Sissy Spacek, Car-
rie, and Liv Ullman, Face to
Face.
All The President's Men plac-
ed third in the number of nom-
inations vith eight, followed by
Bound for Glory with six. Both
were named for best picture,
along with Network, Rocky and
Taxi Driver.
Rocky also drew nominations
for supporting actor for Bur-
gess Meredith and Burt Young.

The category also includes Ned
Beatty of Network, Laurence
Olivier of, Marathon Man and
Jason Robards of All The Presi-
dent's Men.
SUPPORTING aqress nomi-
nees: Jane Alexander, All The
President's Men; Jodie Foster,
Taxi Driver; Lee Grant, Voyage
of the Damned; Piper Laurie,
Carrie; Beatrice Straight, Net-
work.
Sidney ILumet of Network and
John Avildsen of Rocky receiv-
ed nominations for best direc-
tion, along with Alan Pakula for
All The President's Men; Ing-
mar Bergman, Face to Face,
and Lina Wertmuller, S e v e n
Beauties.

ch I an aisave
your lif.
AmericanI
Cancer Society.
Tm'S SPACE Co NTRfSUfW *iY TH PU8US46R

Gene Littler

i

MONO BOOGIE BAN D
APPEARING FEB. 10, 11, 12
AT

Film festival begins tonight

THE ROADHOUSE
72 OFF ON PITCHERS-Wed. nights
Cover only $1 before 10 p.m. on Wed.

H

By DAVID KEEPS day, will be held in the Schor-
ing Auditorium in the School of
OME MOVIES don't'have to ! Education, on the corner of
be boring. They can be- a Monroe and East University.
legitimate means to a creative This year, over 100 contest-
and profitable end, say board ants will vie for a minimum of
members of the Ann Arbor Film $1,000 in cash awards. The prize
Co-op. The Co-op is sponsoring money comes largely from do-
the Ann Arbor Film Festival, nations from supportive film
which begins tonight at 7. co-ops and ticket sales at the
The festival, now in its. sev- door.
enth consecutive year, is loose- BUT GLORY and money,
ly billed as "the National Ama- aren't the most important part
teur Film Festival" and boasts of the festival.
entries from filmmakers in Cal- Jim Frisinger, festival man-
ifornia, New York, Ontario and ager explains, "We provide a
points between. The weekend service to filmmakers who want
events, two night of judged ex- to have their work shown in
hibitions on Friday and Satur- public, but have no outlets.
day, and a program featuring Eight millimeter filmmaking is
this year's prize winners on Sun- really the people's medium, it's

the cheapest and most accessi- "
ble way to get an idea onto
film."
The festival, believed to be
the oldest in the U.S., was
founded in 1970 by filmmaker
members of the Residential Col-
lege.
Though there are fewer en-
tires in this year's program, movie' m ie' STREISAND
Frisinger promises "a really KRLSTOFFERSON
eclectic show, including anima-
tion, experimental films, come-
dies and documentaries. Except 1015 20,10
for raw pornography, we've got 1:36:0
just about everything." -4 9.15
Screenings begin at 7 and 9, 700
9:5 (no
and an additional matinee is
scheduled for 2 p.m. tomorrow. B Re
Admission tickets, $1 per show,
are available at the door.
( -

.r

+ r
, ti

t~
--._.

PIZZA AVAILABLE
TILL I A.M.
The Roadhouse is lo-
cated four miles north
of Ann Arbor at U.S.'
23 and N. Territorial
Rd. Information 665-
3967
Enjoy dining before the
s h o w upsfairs at the
Hill ounge

The
ROAbHOUSE
U.S. 23

N. Tcrir t
Ann
Arbor

'i mi_

...... ..r,.

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___, _.
,
A~
-

WEST SIDE
BOOK SHOP
Used & Rare Books Bought & Sold
" LIBRARIES PURCHASED
" FREE SEARCH SERVICE
113 West Liberty * 995-1891
Open Mon-Sat 1'1 to 6pm
Thurs & Fri Evenings 'til 9pm

HOWARD HAWKS' 19464
THE BIG SLEEP
Humphrey Bogart plays Phil Marlowe in this classic rendition
of Raymond Chandler's novel. Lauren Bacall plays an attrac-
tive young rich,"widow who, along with her sassy sister, pre-
sent Marlowe one of his most confusing cases. The lively
screenplay is by Chandler, Hawks and William Faulker.
Sat.: THE MISSOURI BREAKS
CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
CINEMA7:00 & 9:05 Adrmission $1.25
ALAIN TANNER'S 1972
LA SALAMANDRE
Vaulting its director into the front franks of European film-
makers, this film presents the story of a free spirited work-
na-class woman. who becomes involved with two different

fArt ° T

LLI
L VALrm T,

ri

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