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February 05, 1977 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, -.February 5, 1977

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, February 5, 1977

The Professional Theatre Program
ANNOUNCES
AUDITIONS
for the 1950's Black Musical
TAMBOURINES TO GLORY
Cast: 10 Males & 10 Females
THE AUDITION WILL CONSIST OF:
1) SINGING A PREPARED SONG (accompanist
will be provided)
2) A DANCE AUDITION
3) READING
-'You will not be expected to be proficient in all these
areos**
SATURDAY, FEB. 12 at 1:00 p.m.
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE
(2nd floor Frieze Bldg.)
For further information 763-5213

CARTER'S GOAL:

Hospital lauds 'woman

Limit bureaucracy

(Continued from Page1)
said, "We were looking for a
woman who by the nature of
her job received no great re-
cognition."
"Number of nominations re-
ceived was not the key, to se-
lections, of course," Comstock
added, "but 44 of Mary's co-
workers said she was cheer-
ful, had never - failing pa-
tience and was always effic-
ient."
THE FIRST Hospital Woman
of the Year was selected in
1976 to observe International
Women's Year. The Commis-
sion then decided to make the

award an annual event.
Nomination forms were dis-
tributed throughout the hospital
and returned to the Commission,
which then selected the out-
standing nominees for inter-
views. The Commission made
the final selection and Hoey's
award .was announced January
20.
The Medical Center Women's
Commission originated in 1973
because, Comstock said, "the
Med Center is so big we heed-
ed a local (woman's) organiza-
tion." There is also a Univer-
sity Women's Commission which
centers its activities on cen-
tral campus issues.
INCLUDED IN THE Med Cen-
ter Commission are women from
all areas of hospital organiza-
tion including doctors, nurses,
administrators, housekeeping
workers and medical students.
In the past men have served
on the commission but thererare
no males among the 10 current
members.

"Our primary objective," com-
mission chair Vanessa Beer
said, "is to review the Univer-
sity's affirmative action pro-
gram at the hospital"
In addition to selecting the
Woman of the Year, the Com-
mission has also reviewed the'
status of women at University
Hospital as it compares to oth-
er national'hospitals. "We re-
cently made a report to the
Dean of the-Medical School con-
cerning the status of female stu-
dents at the hospital," Beer
said.
"The hospital and the Medi-
cal School support the Commis-
sion," Beer emphasized.

(Continued from Page 1)
tions Committee. His committee
must review - and could amend.
- Carter's proposal.
Brooks said he would require
that no reorganization plan take
effect without direct approval
by both houses of Congress
within 60 days after it is sub-
mitted.
THE PRESIDENT told report-
ers at the White House that
"this is a commitment that I
made in hundreds of speeches

around the country during the reduced to no more than 200
two-year campaign. It was one with a great savings in tax
of the major reasons I was elect- money and a streamlining of
ed." services to our people."
If Congress grants him the Askedi if Carter still had 200
authority he seeks, Carter said, ,departments and agencies as a
"I will move aggressively, but; reorganization -goal, Whit e
also carefully, work closely with House Press Secretary Jody
Congress and make changes that Powell said. "Nothing has cer-
will be of benefit to all of us in tairly changed since the cam-
administering the affairs of the paign."
people of this country." ,But he emphasized that any
During the campaign, Carter resulting personnel reductions
said he thought "the present would be achieved through at-
1,900 federal departments can be trition and not firings.

it's business as usual in A2

C

611 , E. William
2 minutes from
Angell Hall
Delta Kappa Epsilon

HUNGRY'?
(FOR FRATERNAL L FE)
FREE
PIZZA- BEER
SUNDAY, FEB. 6th
5-8:00 p.m.

Ii

CAMP ECHO LAKE
(N.Y. Adirondacks)
ON CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
FEB. 14 and 15
For exciting and challenging
summer positions in co-ed
environment for Upperclass-
men, G r a d s and Faculty;
Waterfront and Gymnastics
Directors, T e n n i s, Crafts,
and general staff.
Contact: Placement Office
for appointment (763-4117)

if
you
see
news
happen
call
76-DAILY

(Continued from Page 1)
the work during the day," Baker
said. "And we've turned down
the thermostats to 62*. I told my
employes that if they get cold
they'll just have to wear a
sweater."
JACOBSON'S started its re-.
duced hours earlier this week
with a two-hour per week cut-
'back. The store's normal Zhurs-
day and Friday late-night clos-
ing of 9 p.m. has been moved up
to 8 p.m. The managers have
also reduced lighting and low-
ered temperatures in a further
effort to conserve energy.
Although Moe's Sports Shop,

owned by Budd VanDeWege, has
no plans to cut back hours, the
shop will conserve some energy
in other ways.
"We used 'to run our skate
sharpening machine all day," he
pointed out. "Now we only run
it from 2-4 each afternoon. We
figure that saves 'about 20 per
cent of 'the energy it takes to
run the machine.
"WE'VE ALSO. cut our light-
ing and turned down the heat,"
VanDeWege added. "But I real-
ly don't feel President Carter's
(and Milliken's) call is to the
small businessman. It's the big

plants they were talking about
mostly, those places use more
energy in five minutes than vie
do in a day."
ONASSIS Coney Island has
taken no steps to conserve en-
ergy, according to cook Ed
Conklin. while Kresge, Border's
Book Shop, Olga's Kitchen,
Middle Earth and the Wolverine
Den havetreduced lighting and
lowered temperatures.
Dennis Webster, manager of
the University Cellar, said that
the store has done nothing in
response to Milliken's pleas be-
cause its heating is controlled
by the University.

r

'I

Five held in
heroin delivery

(Continued from Page 1)
MORTIMER "Pat" Patterson,
Jr., of 1747 Green, Ann Arbor, is'
being held on $10,000 bond. He
has had four felony convictions,
including possession of heroin
and stolen property'and a switch
blade, according to court rec-
ords.
Connie Luckett, of 533 Long-
shore, is charged with two her-
oin deliveries, and is being held
on $8,000 bond.
Leon Taylor (alias Mike Wil-

son) and Pearlean Taylor (alias
"Angel" Wilson, of 105 E. Sum-
mit, are each being held on
$4,000 bond.
THE MAXIMUM sentence for
delivery of heroin is 20 years
in prison and/or $25 000.
The five will appear in Ann
Arbor Circuit Court on February
9 for an examination which will
determine if there is sufficient
evidence for further court pro-
-eedings.

_. _ :.

JOIN THE DAILY STAFF

AWo-

yen's

I; I

Personal Growth Group
focused on ourselves & our relation-
ships with others:
friendships and lasting
intimate involvements
* 9 two-hour w e e k I y sessions (beginning
Thursday, Feb. 10, 7-9 p.m.) exploring:
* values around interpersonal relationships
* problems & concerns in specific relationships
& relationships in general

-I
,.~
I
i

Drake s:
Link to
the, past
(Continued from Page 3)
ing to Mr. Tibbals, "everyone
else started doing it (deliver-
ing), too."
. "During the war." he recalls,
"you couldn't'get candy. any-
where." So Mr. Tibbals lined his
shelves with stuffed animals of
the Walt Disney era; and after
the war, he introduced the now
familiar candy and teas.
At one time, the shop's upper
level was home for the owners.
Now called the Martian Room,
this area serves as an additin-
al dining room when the need
arises.
WHAT USED to be known as
the Walnut Room (named for its
panelling) is upstairs, too. Now
a storage area crammed with
boxes, the Walnut Room was
once the scene of music and
dancing. Notebooks cataloguing
over 2000 recordings were made
available for customers who'd
then submit their musical re-
quests on slips of paper. "We
stooped this around 1946," re-
calls Mrs. T i b b a I s, "because
people didn't want to dance any-
more."
Another unused portion of the
store is the burger bar. Once
known for such delicacies as the
"peanut burger", the bar wa's a
short.-lived entity because Mr.
Tibbals was unable to find a
full-time employe. Today, he en-
livens the store by trekking to
candy conventions and collect-
ing an assortment of global
goodies.
But the Tibbals' allegiance re-
mnains with the customers and
employes whose unfettering sup-
port has helped make Drake's
a campus I e g e n d. Mr. Tib-
bals recalls some former em-
ployes who left town and found
more lucrative positions as doc-
tors and dentists - "A bunch
of slobs," he grins, "scattered
all over the place."

* various issues involved in

relationships-
fr r & t n

'
II
l'
+ E
'

C
Ii
9

beginnings, endings, rneeds, Cm ort sup~-
port, sexuality, loss & grief, anger, etc.
ome to a BRIEF introductory meeting
t 4 p.m. Tues., Feb. 8th in Ethics & Re-
gion Conference Rm., 3rd floor, MichiI-
on Union.
FOR REGISTRATION & FURTHER INFORMATION-
CALL 764-7442 H
Sponsored by Office of Ethics &_Religionf
- - ______ ___________________________ -__________ 'I

=--Z

=i

N

When you've got only2ticketstothe big game
.ndyounforgot that you asked Cheryl,LonTracy,
elly,Sabi's : and Trim habutey ddn't
.....it's no fimeto get filedup.

i

dciii fore.2
not teneration.

*-N

I

I

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