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February 04, 1977 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
A rts & Enterta inm ent Friday, February 4, 1977 Page Five

The dance-they're not
just in it for the kicks

.
"t -

Bowie's lat

wst: Extraordinary I
"Be My Wife" comes closer to It has a jazzy feel, and some well. "Keeping Wall" is Bowie's
rock than any of the albums' marvelous sax playing on solo tour-do-force. Sounding
other cuts, but something is out Bowie's part. like water. running, it shows
of place. "Art Decade" is a Bowie/ that Bowie can pull off the
"What in the World" and Eno duet. Peaceful, yet anx- avante-garde music of this al-
"Sound and Vision" are the Ions sounding, is uses cellos bum without Eno's help.

By ELAINE ELSON
BALLET is more than bounding leaps and
lovely ballerinas; underneath the glamor-
ous veneer is a tough business.
Members of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet verified
that truth in interviews following last Sunday
afternoon's performance at the Power Center.
"Your body can blow, out tomorrow," testi-
fied premier danseur Bill Lark. "You can
dislocate your knee and that's the end."
And {ballerina Betsy Carson, whose partially
slipped 'disc trouble is exacerbated by the chill,
said she plans to go into physiotherapy for danc-
ers when her ballet career is over, in sym-
pathy for the well-being of her fellow artists.
That career end is not so late in life for
many ballet dangers, one of the main reasons
being that it is not a lucrative career. Teach-
ing it is much more secure. Dancers often
spin off into choreography, for instance, as Lark
plans to.
"BUT I'LL probably keep dancing util I'm
about 38," he said, adding, "It (the working day)
is a long day. You want to stop (your dancing
career) before there isn't anything left in
you."
The Royal Winnipeg Ballet does indeed keep
long days, both at home and on tour. A
typical daily schedule includes practice, prac-
tice and more practice - 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
five days a week, with an hour off for lunch.
During rehetarsal time, old ballets are re-
viewed, new ones choreographed and learned.
"YOU NEVER stop rehearsing and learning
when you're in the company," Lark said.

This is especially true while the company
is on tour - about 70 per cent of the year..
The hectic schedule is often rough on the
dancers, who must spend many hours a day
sitting on the bus.
"Touring is nine weeks of one night stands
and living out of a suitcase," complained
company manager Peter Garrick.
WITH STIFF muscles and little sleep to bol-
ster their energy, those on tour must practice
for over an hour before curtain. And, injuries
notwithstanding, they have to put on a bold front
along with their make-up.
As Lark put it. "On tour, you make it look
like you're not sick." Even if you are. Baller-
ina Marina Eglevsy, for example, confessed
backstage Sunday that she had nearly sprair:'
an ankle while performing a ballet burlesque
of Mozart's "La Ci Darem la Mano". Her in-
jury, however, did not show through in her
graceful performance.
Members of the company, which with only
25 dancers is on the small side, show a spirit
of camaraderie and fun despite the rigor of
their work. Like other occupations, thougl, the
dance creates mixed feelings.
Ballerina Carson summed up her dancing
career this way: "It's fun in a certain way,
but it's a hell of a lot of work and can get lone-
ly sometimes," she said. "Occasionally, some-
one will say something nice to you or you just
make yourself keep going; but there are many
hours of physical pain.".
"When I'm done, I think I'd like to get a nice
house out in the country - and then get fat."

By MIKE TAYLOR BOWIE DOES most of the
LAST YEAR,* David Bowie singing, but on some tracks he's
announced he had be- aided by Eno,; Iggy Pop (whose
come disgusted with rock'n, new album Bowie just produc-
oro andiwas quitting it for ed), and Mary Visconti (whose
roll andwa qutigifo husband Tony produced Bowie's
good. Needless to say, few be- earliest albums and helped
lieved him; after all, he had him produce this one) A huge
"retired" from the stage in variety of instruments have
1973, only to reappear the next been used to create a seeming-
year. This time, however, it ly endless range of textures,
seems Bowie wasn't kidding. moods, and sensations. Eno
True, he's released a new a- and Bowie both play a hefty
bum, Low (RCA CPL1-2030),I selection of electronic music
but is sure isn't rock'n'roll. ' oerrs
Working closely with Brian producers.t
Eno, England's most inventive Perhaps the strongest spect
avante - garde musician, Bowie of the album is the di ersity
has created a brillian collection of the material. No two songs
of musical episodes. Although are similar. '
he has retained essentially the Two instrumentals frame{
same band he used on lasts five vocal tracks on 1side one.
year's Station to Station, and "Speed ow Life" is bouncy and
employs at times structures melodic; Carlos 9lomar's disco
and mechanisms similar to-influenced guitar licks are the
those used in rock, his new record's sole reminder of
music can best be described as Bowie's recent excursion into
an abstraction of rock. myths and blues music.
Bowie achieves this by break-
ing all the rules; by turning "A NEW CAREER in a New
rock upside down and inside Town" is Side One's most ex-I
out. The end result seems perimental track; the title is t
quite alien at first-but because very apt - this tune epitomizes;
it began as rock, vestiges of Bowie's newest musical ven-
familiarity remain. The melo- ture. Beginning as smooth andI
dies are sometimes peaceful, serene as some of the material1
sometimes energetic, some- on Eno's Another Green World,c
times jarring, but always in- it sounds like music being pro-c
describably unique. The often duced by a machine. BowI's
Dadaesque lyrics are frequent- eerie harmonica quickly enters
ly used as instruments; much the picture, adding a touch of1
of the material is purely instru-. human warmth to the cool, pre-
mental. cision feeling of the surrounding1
instrumentation.
The bluesy "Breaking Glass"
refers to alienation and fear.1

side's most strongly developed
numbers. Featuring Iggy Pop's
vocals and some of the record's
most inspired instrumentation,
"What in the World" is a haunt
ing love song. In. "Sound and
Vision" Bowie plays some ex-
cellent rock influenved saxo-
phone, and the lyrics are quite
bizarre.
"ALWAYS CRASHING in the
Same Car" is a nightmarish
vision. Bowie's vocals remind
one of Lou Reed, and his use
of cello tapes reminds one of
the saxophone. The melody is
dense and plodding, the lyrics
scary.
Low's second side is far more
experimental than the first.
Bowie and Eno provide nearly
all the instrumentation. Al-
though Bowie uses his voice on
three of the numbers, his
sounds for the most part are
not comprehensible as lyrics;
the effect is reminiscent of
Nico. The tunes could best be.
called aural paintings (but-
closer to Jackson Pollock than
Michelangelo).
"Warszawa" was composed
by Eno, who plays all the in-
struments; Bowie lends only
his vocals. It's a slow, lengthy
number, with an intense melo-
dy that develops well. "Sub-
terraneans" is also quite long.

Cinema Weekend
Friday - Lawrence of Arabia (Aud. A, Angell, 6:15, 10);
Take the Money and Run (Aud. 3, MLB, 7, 8:54, 10:30);
Play it Again Sam (Aud. 4, MLB, 7, 8:45, 10:30); The
Conformist (Old Arch. Aud., 7, 9:05 p.m.); Dr. Zhivago
(Nat. Sci. Aud., 8 only); On the Waterfront (Rm. 100, Hut-
chins Hall, 7, 9:10 p.m.).
Saturday - Logan's Run (Couzens cafeteria, 8, 10 p.m.);
Return of the Dragon (Aud. 3, MLB, 7, 10:30 p.m.; The
Chinese Connection (Aud. 3, MLB, 8:45); Family Plot (Aud.
4, MLB, 7, 9 p.m.); A Brief Vacation (Old Arch. Aud., 7,
9:05 p.m.); West Side Story (Nat. Sci. Aud., 7'9:45 p.m.)
O Lucky Man (Aud. A, Angell, 7, 10 p.m.).
Sunday - Darling (Ad. A Angell, 7, 9' p.m.); Arthurj
Rubenstein - Love of Life (And. 4, MLB, 7 p.m.); Painters
Painting (Aud. 4, MLB, 9 p.m.); 11 Posto (Old Arch. Aud.,"
7, 9:05 p.m.).
All Weekend - The Enforcer: State Theatre (662-5296);
Bugsy Malone: Campus (668-6098); Obsession, The Seven
Percent Solution, A Star is Born, The Pink Panther Strikes
Again: The Movies, Briarwood (769-8783); Echoes of the
Summer: Michigan (668-8480); Rocky: Fifth Forum (769-
1300); The Silver Streak: Fox Village (769-1300).

Venezuelans enlv

.MW. .. ,

By MARA BRAZER
WEDNESDAY night's "Danzas Vene-
zuela" was a well integrated display
of regional folk dances throughout Vene-
zuela's history.
The nineteen dances ranged from Car-
nival buffoonery to mime. Most of the
pieces were accompanied by a small string
and percussion band, often with live sing-
ers.
Yolanda Moreno, principal dancer and
sole choreographer of the original works,
was the backbone of the company. With-
out her the show would have been repeti-
tious - -bordering on dull - since the
group dances were more suited to parties
or formal dances where the enjoyment
is in participation rather than sitting stiff-

ly in the Power Center. At times the aud-
ience was compelled to join in with band
clapping although the pervasive mood was
passive.
YOLANDA Moreno was a true perform-
er while the Corps de Ballet seemed con-
tent to merely demonstrate the regional
variations. Most memorable were Mor-
eno's African-inspired pieces, such as
"Sobre el son de los Tambores", where
she dancedl with an alacrity and punc-
tuality ' to the beat of three druis. Her
movements were always technically pre-
cise as well as fluid in her beautiful inter-
pretations of her native dance art forms.
Moreno's face was particularly illumin-

on sage
ating and expressive. Most superb w a s
her mime of the Venezuelan -housewife's
morning drudgrey. She was exactly on
time with the percussive accompaniments
to her scratching, knocking, sweeping,
grinding corn, lighting fires, and interven-
tion in a dog and cat fight.
There were many South Americans in
the audience and Spanish speakers who
could appreciate the spoken and sung hu-
mor, and it was evident that the Venezue-
]an spectators appreciated this fleeting
transport back to familiar sights and
sounds.
Danzas Venezuela was given a standing
ovation, which, perhaps only Yolanda
Moreno - called "the ballerina df the
Venezuelan People" - truly deserved.

MAJOR EVENTS OFFICE
REGRETS TO ANNOUNCE
that
JEFF BECK
Has Cancelled His Tour
JEFF BECK WILL NOT APPEAR AT
CRISLER ARENA ON FEBRUARY 27
Ticket refunds are available at the Michigan
Union Box Office, 11:30-5:30, Monday thru
Friday. Tickets purchased at Hudson's will be
refunded at Hudson's.

.a

I.

" " ! -p

Slusser, show lacks verve

THE ROC'KETS
APPEARING FEB. 2, 4 & 5
AT

I.

RICHARD HARRIS in ROBERT L JOSEPHS ECHOES OFA SUMMER I
A SANDY HOWARD-RICHARD HARRIS Production . Starring LOIS NETTLETTON - GE RAL DINE FITZGERALD
WILLIAM WIND6OM. BRAD SAVAGE and JODIE FOSTER as DIERDRE - Directed by DON TAYLOR
Produced and Written for the screen by ROBERT L JOSEPH - Eecvtive Poducers SANDY HOWARD and
RICHARD HARRIS A Castle Service Company Feature - COLOR
A CINE ARTSTSGAJ'ICTURES RELEASE x ", ,,-~ ,+

By DEBBY WITTBRODT
The winding white maze lead-
ing into this year's undergrad-
uate art show (Feb. 1-17th, Slus-
ser Galery) ends in disappoint-
ment.
The works, ranging from oil
paintings to screen printing, are
restrained at best, lacking the
essential elements of risk typ-
ified in today's contemporary
art. Compared to previous ex-
hibitions, according to Joyce
Lieberman and Scott Minick -
coordinators of this year's show
-quality has declined along
with student interest. The jur-
ists choosing the final works out
of over 240 entries (Mary Jane
Jac6bs, assistant curator of the
Detroit Museum of Art and Joe
DeLuca, professor of Painting
& Drawing at Western Univer-
sity) generally commented on
the carelessness in basic tech-
ik!..

nique and lack of innovation.
THE FEW bright spots in the
collection lie mostly in the areas
of photography and ceramic
sculpture. Joan Ford's p h o t o-
graphs of familiar and unfam-
iliar expanses of skin are a
sensitive view of her own per-
sonality, yet leave room for con-
cluding interpretation.
The several ceramics exhibit-
ed add a reestablishing touch.
A piece by Mary Jo Bole sug-
gests anything from weathered
cacti to abode skyscrapers in
its softened perpendiculars.

Corland Stebbins - a bold sim-
plistic triplet of blue and white
neon light exemplifying the ver-
ve lacking in most of the show's
legitimate paintings.
Fortunately, in the upcoming
two Bachelor of Fine Arts ex-
hibitions this spring there's a
chance the presiding stalepess
of art may'disappear with wint-
er. Painting, judged lowest in
quality in the present show, is
the medium to watch - hope-
fully it will break with present
tradition, as some of the cera-
mics have, and bring to the sur-

THE ROADHOUSE
1/2 FF ON PITCHERS-Wed. nights
Cover only $1 before 10 p.m. on Wed.

N

--P

PIZZA AVAILABLE
TILL 1 A.M.
The Roadhouse is lo-
cated four miles north
of Ann Arbor at U.S.
23 and N. Territorial
Rd. information 665-
3967
Enjoy dining before the
s h a w upstairs at the
Hill Lounge

M, Terr

The
ROADHOUSE

6

U.S. 23

Ann
Arbor

In neither category but worthy face more of the energetic sen-
of mention is a "painting" by, sitivity of the students.
FTALENT>
t-SEARCH '77 U
We'd Like To Discover You!
Q Tech Interviews 1:00, Auditions 2:00
v SOUTH BEND AREA -WED., FEB. 9
SHERATON MOTOR INN
423 N. MICHIGAN ST. - SOUTH BEND
BATTLE CREEK AREA- THURS., FEB. 10 -
HOLIDAY INNZ
u 5050BECKLEY/1.94 --BATTLE CREEK -
r
ANN ARBOR AREA- FRI., FEB. 11 >
BRIARWOODIHILTON M
S. STATE ST /I-94 -ANN ARBOR
z
DETROIT AREA-- SAT.,FEB.12 I
TROY HILTON INN-n
15 MILE ROAD/1.75 - TROY
ALSO AT CEDAR POINTM
SAT., FEB. 5, SUN., FEB. 13
FOR OTHER AUDITION SITES
AND FURTHER 'INFORMATION
CONTACT
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT DEPT. C)
-CEDAR POINT, INC. >
rnSANDUSKY, OHIO 44870 to/

BERTOLUCCI'S 1970
THE CONFORMIST
Pauline Kael calls this f i I m "A sumptuous, emotionally-
charged experience" and d i r e c t o r Bernardo Bertolucci
(LAST TANGO IN PARIS) weaves a visually captivating,
intense narrative of a rising young fascist assassin in the
'30's that is worthy of the praise. Sexual conflict and confu-
sion hinders his mission and the women he meets. Short:
THANATOPIS-- (Ed Emschwiller) .
CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
7:00 & 9:05 Admission $1.25
DAVID LEAN'S 1962
LAWRENCE OF ARABIA
This on-location extravaganza displays the characteristics
n nr~ere~r~n 'e ~ncc~re DinrA T,.,1, cr~r ire+1-a r~a e (

I

I

LYMAN
WOODARD

F /FfirEif 1rflG- ARE r MC) /iE
EV/E~Y DECADE AGJRAI A vO\I /I ~UJCAL

ORGANIZATION
with
RON ENGLISH
SUN. - WED.
FE. .-7-8-9
COVEU 5t2.00
(STUOeNT.o0

STARFIRE
DIsco

I . A~~' "" .

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