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February 02, 1977 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-02-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday; February 2 1977

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN ~AILY Wednesday, February 2, 1977

Bentlej
(Continued from Page21)
Ford papers, perhaps near the
library.
BUT, "WE DON'T just' deal
in the paper's of prominent fig-
ures," points out Richard Dool-
en, assistant director of the
Bentley. "Everyday we receive
old diaries and letters from av-
erage everyday citizens. Some-
times a diary from a farm wife
can be a more valuable histori-
cal paper than a letter signed by
a president."
While the original focus of
the library was Michigan his-
tory, it has amassed an impres-
sive collection on non-Michigan
memorabalia. For instance, be-
cause of the diverse interests
and careers of some doners, the
library maintains one of the
finest collections of Phillipine

Library keeps history alive

Inmate fails in suicide-try

papers in the nation.
The library also has bound
issues of many Michigan news-
papers, posters from the temp-
erance movement, tape record-
ings of all WUOM broadcasts
since 1948 and over 200,000 his-
torical photographs.
DOOLEN IS PROUD of the
library and it's expanding col-
lection. Interest in history is
growing, .he maintains. "It
grows out of the United States'
maturing sense that history
wasn't just the doings of white
Anglo-Saxon Protestant men -
there's an interest in what ev-
eryday ordinary people did and
thought."
The Bentley Library was or-
iginally located in the Rack-
ham Building, but several years
ago library patrons began col-

lecting funds to erect a sepa-
rate building for the collection.
Former Michigan Congressman
Alvin Bentley made the largest
donation and, accordingly the
new library was named after
him.
When construction of the Bent-
ley began, prominent families
as well as interested organiza-
tions were able to "purchase"
various rooms and offices in the
library to decorate. These rooms
are miniature museums, each
depicting events and interests in
a prominent person's life.
A LOUNGE has been decora-
ted by a dental fraternity -
Delta Sigma Delta - which
originated at the University.
Along one wall a glass case
displays old fraternity pins, yel-
lowing souveniers from social
activities, old dental tools and
p~laster casts of teth.Poo

P

graphs
Nicholas Ray Double Feature TONIGHT m er
JOHNNY GUITAR Other
(AT 7) the late
A baroque western about a female saloon denburg
keeper (Joan Crawford) and the hostile recep-
tion a town gives her. Also starring Mercedes
and Sterling Hayden.
BIGGER THAN LIFE
(AT 9:05)
A school teacher takes an overdose of cortizone
and turns into a manic depressive who abuses
his wife and fights with his son. With James
Mason, Barbarra Rush and Walter Matthau!
CINEMA GUILD BOTH FILMS OLD ARCH.
SAME DAY COLOR PRINTS
In by 10:00 a.m., Out by :00 p.m.
THREE DAY ENLARGEMENTS
From your negatives, Rush service available
Quality Photofinishing at
Competitive Prices G
20% OFF ON KODAK PHOTOFINISHING
SUN PHOTO
3180 PACKARD 973-0770
2 B ks. E. of Platt Can
EASY DRIVING AND PARKING -
c4 SAa

of former fraternity
s stare down from their
rn the wall.
library rooms honor
Senator Arthur Van-
and Samuel Charles

Osborne, a prominent Michigan
politician.
Although the library was
constructed with private funds,
the University pays for its op-
eration. Special projects, how-
ever, are funded by grants
from private agencies. The
Friends of the Michigan Histor-
ical Collection, a group com-
posed of alumni and others with
special ties to the University,
also raises money for library
projects.
MOST LIBRARY users are
graduate students but, Doolen
says, not all are studying his-
tory. Students of urban plan-
ning, sociology, journalism and
library science also find valu-
able information among the li-
brary's letters, posters and
photographs.
Users must consult the lib-
rary's extensive card cata-
logue to decide which docu-,
ments they want. Then, since
users are not allowed in the
stacks, library staff members
retrieve the material.
The 25 members of the Bent-
ley Library staff include a ref-
erence librarian, a book binder,
cataloguers and a field repre-
sentative who travels through-
out Michigan searching for
new items to add to the collec-
tion. However, most papers the
library receives are donated.
Items are rarely purchased, ex-
cept for books such as county
histories which are sold by
subscription only.
D O O L E N, originally a!
field representative for the li-
brary, says people will fre-
quently give their personal pa-
pers to the library without be- [
ing asked: "One family will
donate their papers, a friend
will hear about it and write us
he says.
"When we get some of our
donations they've just come out
of garages, barns and attics.
The library has a fmrimating
machine which eliminates
mold, mildew and other foreign
substances from the paners.
One collection had mouse drop-
pings," Doolen recalls, "But I

guess that's part of our natural
history."
Once donations are fumigat-
ed they are placed in acid-free
folders and an index is created
for them. Collections are then
stored in protective boxes.
Many of the smaller collections
are stored in only one small box
but others such as the Romney
papers are in 800 boxes.
THE BENTLEY collection is
priceless. "I couldn't even be-
gin to put a cash value on it,"
Doolen says. "Libraries like this
don't think in those terms and
it's time the public didn't ei-,
ther."
Many precautions are taken
to protect the collection, includ-
ing extensive fire detection and
extinguishing systems. If a fire
were to ignite, a halon gas
would be released and deprive
the blaze of oxygen-extinguish-
ing it in seconds.
"We can't use an ordinary
sprinkling system," Doolen
says. "Water would do as much
damage to the collection as
fire."
BUT, DOOLEN hesitates to
name a prize of the Bentley col-
lection because "different peo-
ple value different things."tHow-
ever, he feels the collection of
civil war diaries is among the
best.
The Bentley has also recently
procured some original manu-
scripts of Ernest Hemingway's
short stories from the estate of
the late editor of Esquire maga-
zine, Arnold Gingrich.
Ben ley Library is now ex-
panding its collection to incpde
film and audio recordings. "A
lot of what used to come :n on1
paper is now on tape or is vis-
ual," Doolen says. "We're aiso
trying to reduce bulk by -re-
serving some things on micro-
film."'
"It's important to preserve
current history now," he adds.
"Many Civil War papers have
been saved but we have no hing
from the Spanish-American
War. We're now receiving pa-
pers from groups involved in
current social issues such as pro
and anti-abortion and the peace
movement of the late 1960's." t

(Continued from Page 1)
Two weeks ago Edward Hugh-4
es, a 27-year-old Ypsilanti man,
hanged, himself in his Washte-
naw County Jail cell. Shortly
before his death, -hethad been
diagnosed as 'potentially suici-
dal" during a routine exam to
see if he was competent to standl
trial. Hughes' suicide is present-,
ly under investigation by Prose-
cuting Attorney --William Del-'
hey.
Officials refused to name the1
newly-arrested man. He is be-
ing charged with using a bad
credit card, Carlson said.
"THIS PERSON obviously
needs help," Fournier said, "We
knew that when he was broughti
in."
Fournier also said that issu-1
ing the man a razor invblvedc
no more risk than giving him
a bar of soap or a plate of foodt

- items with which he could
choke himself.
"If a guy is really going to
do it (commit suicide), unless
you have him completely with
nothing, he's going to do it,"
he said.
THE MAN WAS returned to
his cel late yesterday afternoon!
after medical treatment at Uni-
versity Hospital, Fournier said.
The man also underwent a men-
tal health examination at the
hospital's Neuropsychiatric In-
stitute, but Fournier had not
yet received its evaluation, he
said.
The man was in an "agitated
state" upon arrest and arrival
at the jail on Monday, accord-
ing to Fournier. The jail admin-
istrator placed him in a special
block of four cells which re-
ceive 15-minute-interval checks.
The normal interval check is 30
minutes.f

According to Fournier, the pri-
soner wasissued a razor inthe
morning, broke it off and cut
himself, while an officer stood
25 to 30 feet away.
FOURNIER DREW a distinc-
tion between a person who real-
ly wants to die and a person
who is crying for help, plac-
ing the newly-arraigned prison-
er in the second category. "If
a person makes an attempt and
you had ample time to save
him, then he doesn't really want
to die.
"An awful lot of people say
they want to commit suicide,"
Fournier added. "But this does-
n't mean the minute you turn
your back they're going to do
something."
Fournier said "suicidal" is
a broad, general term under
which 80 per' cent of the popu-
lation could fall.

Regents will decide on
proposed dorm rate hike

I HAD
CANCER
AND
I LIVED.

(Continued from Page 1)
solidation and brought it backc
up to 8.4 per cent." ,
RATES AT BAITS and Ox-i
ford Housing will rise even
more. The committee recom-
mended an average increase of
14 per cent at Baits and 16.2
per cent at Oxford.,.
Unlike the "traditional"
dorms, neither Baits nor Ox-
for maintains its own meal,
serrice, which Di Mattia said

helps produce income for some
dorms. Oxford also has had
trouble filling its rooms.
The committee also recom-
mended closing the snack bar
at Baits, which Di Mattia call-
ed "a real loser."
OFF - CAMPUS HOUSING
prices are also expected to rise
next fall; in some buildings as
much as ten per cent. Still,
what is "a good deal" depends
largely on one's taste.
"It really depends on how

you want to live," confessed
Di Mattia. "Could you jive
cheaper (off campus) with five
other people? Yeah, I guess
you could."
The increases are only re-
commendations and must be
approved by the Regents. Last
year the Board approved an
8.9 per cent increase, the high-
est in ten years. Two years ago
the Regents did not vote for an
increase, because they felt they
had not had enough time to
study the recommendations.

MSA

to ask Regents

for funding due date

erry INiiex
ae a PAP test.
n save your life.
American
rcer Society
IcoNrRIButeosv v*. Pu9 j5Itf

See JACK WHITE
INTERNATIONALLY FAMOUS
POCKET BILLIARDS -
& TRICK SHOT ARTIST
in a FREE Pocket Billiard Exhibition
in the UNION BALLROOM
MONDAY, FEB. 7
at 4:00 p.m. & 8:00 pm.

'I

2
C
C
f
1
5
{

(Continued from Pa
cover the costs of Tom
recent appearance on
The money was alsod
cover the costs of fi
presented free of c
campus.}
-The Native Ameri
eignty Teach-In, to be
in March by the Nati
yers Guild, received
-NEW RULES
campaign reimbursem

age 1) dures for students running for didate who spent $30 running for
Hayden's MSA were approved last night. elec'ed office was only reim-
n campus. The new amendments to bursed half of that amount.
directed to MSA's Compiled Code allow in- CAMPAIGN expense limits for
lms to be dividual candidates to receive individual candidates remain at
harge on back all campaign expenses in- $60. A party or slate of candi-
curred up to $30. - dates is limited to $200 for cam-
can- Sover- Under the new rules, a candi- paign expenses, and may be re-
presented date spending $30 for campaign imbirsed up to $100.
onal Law- expenses and submitting a de- The amendments are designed
$300. tailed account of campaign ex- to aid students interested in
tedaccout ofSAw ignr elected office who are financial-
governing penditures to MSA, will be re- ly limited.
ent proce- imbursed $30. Previously, a can- -Jim Browne, a business
school junior- majoring in ac-
counting, was appointed MSA
treasurer.
e a i -ly -After serving as assistant
nt a yelection director last term, Mon-
te Fowler was named to serve
as ele'ction director for this
eyear's spring elections. Fowler,
a junior in electrical and com-
puter engineering, will coordin-
ste the MSA elections set for
Save and bundle April 4 ,ad6

STUDENTS!
The Peer Counselors in Assertiveness Training
at Counseling Services are offering
FREE ON-GOING GROUPS
IN ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
FEATURING:
-beginning and advanced groups of 4 to 6 people.
-meeting 2 hours weekly for 6 to 8 weeks.
-with a supportive atmosphere.r
-teaching learning skills of use in different life situations.
-and focusing on individual assertion issues.
-men'S, women's and co-ed groups available.
To register for an interview, or for more information, stop
by Counseling Services, 3300 Michigan Union, Mon.-Fri,, 9-5
or call 764-8312. Registration ends Tuesday, February 8th.
PUT
ON YOUR DOORSTEP !

Join i

Jacobsons is Open Thursday & Friday Evenings Until 9:00 p.m.

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{
+i4i111 . t

$

old newspapers
for recycling

Midwest's Largest Selection of
European Charters
Canadian and U.S.
from $289
CALL 769-1776
Great Places - .
-------- TAVEL CONSULTANTS
216 S. 4th Ave, Ann Arbor

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RACKHAM GRADUATE STUDENTS:

I

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t
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IF YOU INTEND TO GRADUATE this term with either a
Masters Degree or an Intermediate Degree awarded by the
Rackham Graduate School, you must submit a Diploma
Application to the Records Office, Room 1014, Rackham
Graduate School, no later than 4:00 p.m., Friday, Feb. 4,
1977, in order to be placed on the May 1977 Degree List.
Diploma applications are available in the Rack-
ham Graduate School, Room 1014, as well as
in your Department or Program Office.

r
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S.:

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lots of good buys on furniture, housewares, clothing, shoes,
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